• Autoionization, which results from the interference between direct photoionization and photoexcitation to a discrete state decaying to the continuum by configuration interaction, is a well known example of the important role of electron correlation in light-matter interaction. Information on this process can be obtained by studying the spectral, or equivalently, temporal complex amplitude of the ionized electron wavepacket. Using an energy-resolved interferometric technique, we measure the spectral amplitude and phase of autoionized wavepackets emitted via the sp2+ and sp3+ resonances in helium. These measurements allow us to reconstruct the corresponding temporal profiles by Fourier transform. In addition, applying various time-frequency representations, we observe the build up of the wavepackets in the continuum, monitor the instantaneous frequencies emitted at any time and disentangle the dynamics of the direct and resonant ionization channels.
  • We study theoretically the two-center interferences occurring in high harmonic generation from diatomic molecules. By solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation, either numerically or with the molecular strong-field approximation, we show that the electron dynamics results in a strong spectral smoothing of the interference, depending on the value and sign of the driving laser field at recombination. Strikingly, the associated phase-jumps are in opposite directions for the short and long trajectories. In these conditions, the harmonic emission is not simply proportional to the recombination dipole any more. This has important consequences in high harmonic spectroscopy, e.g., for accessing the molecular-frame recombination dipole in amplitude and phase.
  • We investigate how short and long electron trajectory contributions to high harmonic emission and their interferences give access to intra-molecular dynamics. In the case of unaligned molecules, we show experimental evidences that the long trajectory signature is more dependent upon the molecule than the short one, providing a high sensitivity to cation nuclear dynamics within 100's of as to few fs. Using theoretical approaches based on Strong Field Approximation and Time Dependent Schrodinger Equation, we examine how quantum path interferences encode electronic motion whilst molecules are aligned. We show that the interferences are dependent on channels superposition and upon which ionisation channel is involved. In particular, quantum path interferences encodes electronic migration signature while coupling between channels is allowed by the laser field. Hence, molecular quantum path interferences is a promising method for Attosecond Spectroscopy, allowing the resolution of ultra-fast charge migration in molecules after ionisation in a self-referenced manner.
  • Resonant enhancement of high harmonic generation can be obtained in plasmas containing ions with strong radiative transitions resonant with harmonic orders. The mechanism for this enhancement is still debated. We perform the first temporal characterization of the attosecond emission from a tin plasma under near-resonant conditions for two different resonance detunings. We show that the resonance considerably changes the relative phase of neighbouring harmonics. For very small detunings, their phase locking may even be lost, evidencing strong phase distortions in the emission process and a modified attosecond structure. These features are well reproduced by our simulations, allowing their interpretation in terms of the phase of the recombination dipole moment.
  • In recent publications, it has been shown that high-order harmonic generation can be manipulated by employing a time-delayed attosecond pulse train superposed to a strong, near-infrared laser field. It is an open question, however, which is the most adequate way to approximate the attosecond pulse train in a semi-analytic framework. Employing the Strong-Field Approximation and saddle-point methods, we make a detailed assessment of the spectra obtained by modeling the attosecond pulse train by either a monochromatic wave or a Dirac-Delta comb. These are the two extreme limits of a real train, which is composed by a finite set of harmonics. Specifically, in the monochromatic limit, we find the downhill and uphill sets of orbits reported in the literature, and analyze their influence on the high-harmonic spectra. We show that, in principle, the downhill trajectories lead to stronger harmonics, and pronounced enhancements in the low-plateau region. These features are analyzed in terms of quantum interference effects between pairs of quantum orbits, and compared to those obtained in the Dirac-Delta limit.
  • We perform a detailed analysis of how high-order harmonic generation (HHG) and above-threshold ionization (ATI) can be controlled by a time-delayed attosecond-pulse train superposed to a strong, near-infrared laser field. In particular we show that the high-harmonic and photoelectron intensities, the high-harmonic plateau structure and cutoff energies, and the ATI angular distributions can be manipulated by changing this delay. This is a direct consequence of the fact that the attosecond pulse train can be employed as a tool for constraining the instant an electronic wave packet is ejected in the continuum. A change in such initial conditions strongly affects its subsequent motion in the laser field, and thus HHG and ATI. In our studies, we employ the Strong-Field Approximation and explain the features observed in terms of interference effects between various electron quantum orbits. Our results are in agreement with recent experimental findings and theoretical studies employing purely numerical methods.