• We present the discovery of a diffuse optical emission line halo in the Centaurus cluster seen with the MUSE IFU. The unparalleled sensitivity of MUSE allows us to detect the faint emission from this structure which extends well beyond the bounds of the previously known filaments. This structure is detected in many lines typical of the nebulae in cluster cores ([NII]$_{\lambda 6548\&6583}$ ,[SII]$_{\lambda 6716\&6731}$, [OI]$_{\lambda 6300}$, [OIII]$_{\lambda 4959\&5007}$ etc.) but is more than an order of magnitude fainter than the filaments, so can only be traced to the limits of the data at a radius of ~3.5 kpc with the brightest line in the spectrum ([NII]$_{\lambda 6583}$). The structure is shown to be kinematically distinct from the stars in the central galaxy and potentially the filamentary component of the nebula. Possible origins are discussed and we conclude that the excitation and kinematics of the structure are most consistent with a distinct structure of faint or disrupted filaments dispersed throughout the cluster core, suggesting that the cold gas in these regions is not confined to the bright filamentary structures typically seen.
  • The Virgo Environmental Survey Tracing Ionised Gas Emission (VESTIGE) is a blind narrow-band Halpha+[NII] imaging survey carried out with MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. The survey covers the whole Virgo cluster region from its core to one virial radius (104 deg^2). The sensitivity of the survey is of f(Halpha) ~ 4 x 10^-17 erg sec-1 cm^-2 (5 sigma detection limit) for point sources and Sigma (Halpha) ~ 2 x 10^-18 erg sec^-1 cm^-2 arcsec^-2 (1 sigma detection limit at 3 arcsec resolution) for extended sources, making VESTIGE the deepest and largest blind narrow-band survey of a nearby cluster. This paper presents the survey in all its technical aspects, including the survey design, the observing strategy, the achieved sensitivity in both the narrow-band Halpha+[NII] and in the broad-band r filter used for the stellar continuum subtraction, the data reduction, calibration, and products, as well as its status after the first observing semester. We briefly describe the Halpha properties of galaxies located in a 4x1 deg^2 strip in the core of the cluster north of M87, where several extended tails of ionised gas are detected. This paper also lists the main scientific motivations of VESTIGE, which include the study of the effects of the environment on galaxy evolution, the fate of the stripped gas in cluster objects, the star formation process in nearby galaxies of different type and stellar mass, the determination of the Halpha luminosity function and of the Halpha scaling relations down to ~ 10^6 Mo stellar mass objects, and the reconstruction of the dynamical structure of the Virgo cluster. This unique set of data will also be used to study the HII luminosity function in hundreds of galaxies, the diffuse Halpha+[NII] emission of the Milky Way at high Galactic latitude, and the properties of emission line galaxies at high redshift.
  • This paper provides an update of our previous scaling relations (Genzel et al.2015) between galaxy integrated molecular gas masses, stellar masses and star formation rates, in the framework of the star formation main-sequence (MS), with the main goal to test for possible systematic effects. For this purpose our new study combines three independent methods of determining molecular gas masses from CO line fluxes, far-infrared dust spectral energy distributions, and ~1mm dust photometry, in a large sample of 1444 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 4. The sample covers the stellar mass range log(M*/M_solar)=9.0-11.8, and star formation rates relative to that on the MS, delta_MS=SFR/SFR(MS), from 10^{-1.3} to 10^{2.2}. Our most important finding is that all data sets, despite the different techniques and analysis methods used, follow the same scaling trends, once method-to-method zero point offsets are minimized and uncertainties are properly taken into account. The molecular gas depletion time t_depl, defined as the ratio of molecular gas mass to star formation rate, scales as (1+z)^{-0.6}x(delta_MS)^{-0.44}, and is only weakly dependent on stellar mass. The ratio of molecular-to-stellar mass mu_gas depends on (1+z)^{2.5}x (delta_MS)^{0.52}x(M*)^{-0.36}, which tracks the evolution of the specific star formation rate. The redshift dependence of mu_gas requires a curvature term, as may the mass-dependences of t_depl and mu_gas. We find no or only weak correlations of t_depl and mu_gas with optical size R or surface density once one removes the above scalings, but we caution that optical sizes may not be appropriate for the high gas and dust columns at high-z.
  • We have performed a multi-wavelength analysis of two galaxy cluster systems selected with the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect and composed of cluster pairs and an inter-cluster filament. We have focused on one pair of particular interest: A399-A401 at redshift z~0.073 seperated by 3 Mpc. We have also performed the first analysis of one lower significance newly associated pair: A21-PSZ2 G114.09-34.34 at z~0.094, separated by 4.2 Mpc. We have characterised the intra-cluster gas using the tSZ signal from Planck and, when this was possible, the galaxy optical and infra-red (IR) properties based on two photometric redshift catalogs: 2MPZ and WISExSCOS. From the tSZ data, we measured the gas pressure in the clusters and in the inter-cluster filaments. In the case of A399-A401, the results are in perfect agreement with previous studies and, using the temperature measured from the X-rays, we further estimate the gas density in the filament and find n0=4.3+-0.7x10^-4 cm-3. The optical and IR colour-colour and colour-magnitude analyses of the galaxies selected in the cluster system, together with their Star Formation Rate, show no segregation between galaxy populations, in the clusters and in the filament of A399-A401. Galaxies are all passive, early type, and red and dead. The gas and galaxy properties of this system suggest that the whole system formed at the same time and corresponds to a pre-merger, with a cosmic filament gas heated by the collapse. For the other cluster system, the tSZ analysis was performed and the pressure in the clusters and in the inter-cluster filament was constrained. However, the limited or nonexistent optical and IR data prevent us from concluding on the presence of an actual cosmic filament or from proposing a scenario.
  • We present an analysis of 55 central galaxies in clusters and groups with molecular gas masses and star formation rates lying between $10^{8}-10^{11}\ M_{\odot}$ and $0.5-270$ $M_{\odot}\ yr^{-1}$, respectively. We have used Chandra observations to derive profiles of total mass and various thermodynamic variables. Molecular gas is detected only when the central cooling time or entropy index of the hot atmosphere falls below $\sim$1 Gyr or $\sim$35 keV cm$^2$, respectively, at a (resolved) radius of 10 kpc. This indicates that the molecular gas condensed from hot atmospheres surrounding the central galaxies. The depletion timescale of molecular gas due to star formation approaches 1 Gyr in most systems. Yet ALMA images of roughly a half dozen systems drawn from this sample suggest the molecular gas formed recently. We explore the origins of thermally unstable cooling by evaluating whether molecular gas becomes prevalent when the minimum of the cooling to free-fall time ratio ($t_{\rm cool}/t_{\rm ff}$) falls below $\sim10$. We find: 1) molecular gas-rich systems instead lie between $10 < min(t_{\rm cool}/t_{\rm ff}) < 25$, where $t_{\rm cool}/t_{\rm ff}=25$ corresponds approximately to cooling time and entropy thresholds $t_{\rm cool} \lesssim 1$ Gyr and 35 keV~cm$^2$, respectively, 2) $min(t_{\rm cool}/t_{\rm ff}$) is uncorrelated with molecular gas mass and jet power, and 3) the narrow range $10 < min(t_{\rm cool}/t_{\rm ff}) < 25$ can be explained by an observational selection effect. These results and the absence of isentropic cores in cluster atmospheres are in tension with "precipitation" models, particularly those that assume thermal instability ensues from linear density perturbations in hot atmospheres. Some and possibly all of the molecular gas may instead have condensed from atmospheric gas lifted outward either by buoyantly-rising X-ray bubbles or merger-induced gas motions.
  • We present ALMA Cycle 4 observations of CO(1-0), CO(3-2), and $^{13}$CO(3-2) line emission in the brightest cluster galaxy of RXJ0821+0752. This is one of the first detections of $^{13}$CO line emission in a galaxy cluster. Half of the CO(3-2) line emission originates from two clumps of molecular gas that are spatially offset from the galactic center. These clumps are surrounded by diffuse emission that extends $8~{\rm kpc}$ in length. The detected $^{13}$CO emission is confined entirely to the two bright clumps, with any emission outside of this region lying below our detection threshold. Two distinct velocity components with similar integrated fluxes are detected in the $^{12}$CO spectra. The narrower component ($60~{\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$ FWHM) is consistent in both velocity centroid and linewidth with $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission, while the broader ($130-160~{\rm km}~{\rm s}^{-1}$), slightly blueshifted wing has no associated $^{13}$CO(3-2) emission. A simple local thermodynamic model indicates that the $^{13}$CO emission traces $2.1\times 10^{9}~{\rm M}_\odot$ of molecular gas. Isolating the $^{12}$CO velocity component that accompanies the $^{13}$CO emission yields a CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor of $\alpha_{\rm CO}=2.3~{\rm M}_{\odot}~({\rm K~km~s^{-1}})^{-1}$, which is a factor of two lower than the Galactic value. Adopting the Galactic CO-to-H$_2$ conversion factor in brightest cluster galaxies may therefore overestimate their molecular gas masses by a factor of two. This is within the object-to-object scatter from extragalactic sources, so calibrations in a larger sample of clusters are necessary in order to confirm a sub-Galactic conversion factor.
  • We present new ALMA observations tracing the morphology and velocity structure of the molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster Abell 1795. The molecular gas lies in two filaments that extend 5 - 7 kpc to the N and S from the nucleus and project exclusively around the outer edges of two inner radio bubbles. Radio jets launched by the central AGN have inflated bubbles filled with relativistic plasma into the hot atmosphere surrounding the central galaxy. The N filament has a smoothly increasing velocity gradient along its length from the central galaxy's systemic velocity at the nucleus to -370 km/s, the average velocity of the surrounding galaxies, at the furthest extent. The S filament has a similarly smooth but shallower velocity gradient and appears to have partially collapsed in a burst of star formation. The close spatial association with the radio lobes, together with the ordered velocity gradients and narrow velocity dispersions, show that the molecular filaments are gas flows entrained by the expanding radio bubbles. Assuming a Galactic $X_{\mathrm{CO}}$ factor, the total molecular gas mass is $3.2\pm0.2\times10^{9}$M$_{\odot}$. More than half lies above the N radio bubble. Lifting the molecular clouds appears to require an infeasibly efficient coupling between the molecular gas and the radio bubble. The energy required also exceeds the mechanical power of the N radio bubble by a factor of two. Stimulated feedback, where the radio bubbles lift low entropy X-ray gas that becomes thermally unstable and rapidly cools in situ, provides a plausible model. Multiple generations of radio bubbles are required to lift this substantial gas mass. The close morphological association then indicates that the cold gas either moulds the newly expanding bubbles or is itself pushed aside and shaped as they inflate.
  • Using CO (4-3) and (2-1) Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) data, we prove that the molecular gas in the jet-driven winds of the galaxy IC5063 is more highly excited than the rest of the molecular gas in the disk of the same galaxy. On average, the CO(4-3)/CO(2-1) flux ratio is 1 for the disk and 5 for the jet accelerated or impacted gas. Spatially-resolved maps reveal that in regions associated with winds, the CO(4-3)/CO(2-1) flux ratio significantly exceeds the upper limit of 4 for optically thick gas. It frequently takes values between 5 and 11, and it occasionally further approaches the upper limit of 16 for optically thin gas. Excitation temperatures of 30-100 K are common for the molecules in these regions. If all of the outflowing molecular gas is optically thin, at 30-50 K, then its mass is 2*10^6 M_sun. This lower mass limit is an order of magnitude below the mass derived from the CO(2-1) flux in the case of optically thick gas. Molecular winds can thus be less massive, but more easily detectable at high z than they were previously thought to be.
  • We present ALMA CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the 2A 0335+096 galaxy cluster (z = 0.0346). The total molecular gas mass of (1.13+/-0.15) x 10^9 M_sun is divided into two components: a nuclear region and a 7 kpc long dusty filament. The central molecular gas component accounts for (3.2+/-0.4) x 10^8 M_sun of the total supply of cold gas. Instead of forming a rotationally-supported ring or disk, it is composed of two distinct, blueshifted clumps south of the nucleus and a series of low-significance redshifted clumps extending toward a nearby companion galaxy. The velocity of the redshifted clouds increases with radius to a value consistent with the companion galaxy, suggesting that an interaction between these galaxies <20 Myr ago disrupted a pre-existing molecular gas reservoir within the BCG. Most of the molecular gas, (7.8+/-0.9) x 10^8 M_sun, is located in the filament. The CO emission is co-spatial with a 10^4 K emission-line nebula and soft X-rays from 0.5 keV gas, indicating that the molecular gas has cooled out of the intracluster medium over a period of 25-100 Myr. The filament trails an X-ray cavity, suggesting that the gas has cooled from low entropy gas that has been lifted out of the cluster core and become thermally unstable. We are unable to distinguish between inflow and outflow along the filament with the present data. Cloud velocities along the filament are consistent with gravitational free-fall near the plane of the sky, although their increasing blueshifts with radius are consistent with outflow.
  • Narrow-band HST imaging has resolved the detailed internal structure of the 10 kpc diameter H alpha+[NII] emission line nebulosity in NGC4696, the central galaxy in the nearby Centaurus cluster, showing that the dusty, molecular, filaments have a width of about 60pc. Optical morphology and velocity measurements indicate that the filaments are dragged out by the bubbling action of the radio source as part of the AGN feedback cycle. Using the drag force we find that the magnetic field in the filaments is in approximate pressure equipartition with the hot gas. The filamentary nature of the cold gas continues inward, swirling around and within the Bondi accretion radius of the central black hole, revealing the magnetic nature of the gas flows in massive elliptical galaxies. HST imaging resolves the magnetic, dusty, molecular filaments at the centre of the Centaurus cluster to a swirl around and within the Bondi radius.
  • We report the detection of CO(1-0) emission from NGC 1277, a lenticular galaxy in the Perseus Cluster. NGC 1277 has previously been proposed to host an overmassive black hole (BH) compared to the galaxy bulge luminosity (mass), based on stellar-kinematic measurements. The CO(1-0) emission, observed with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer (PdBI) using both, a more compact (2.9-arcsec resolution) and a more extended (1-arcsec resolution) configuration, is likely to originate from the dust lane encompassing the galaxy nucleus at a distance of 0.9 arcsec (~320 pc). The double-horned CO(1-0) profile found at 2.9-arcsec resolution traces $1.5\times 10^8\ M_\odot$ of molecular gas, likely orbiting in the dust lane at $\sim 550\ \mathrm{km\ s^{-1}}$, which suggests a total enclosed mass of $\sim 2\times 10^{10}\ M_\odot$. At 1-arcsec resolution, the CO(1-0) emission appears spatially resolved along the dust lane in east-west direction, though at a low signal-to-noise ratio. In agreement with the previous stellar-kinematic measurements, the CO(1-0) kinematics is found to be consistent with an $\sim 1.7\times 10^{10}\ M_\odot$ BH for a stellar mass-to-light ratio of $M/L_V=6.3$, while a less massive BH of $\sim 5\times 10^{9}\ M_\odot$ is possible when assuming a larger $M/L_V=10$. While the molecular gas reservoir may be associated with a low level of star formation activity, the extended 2.6-mm continuum emission is likely to originate from a weak AGN, possibly characterized by an inverted radio-to-millimetre spectral energy distribution. Literature radio and X-ray data indicate that the BH in NGC 1277 is also overmassive with respect to the Fundamental Plane of BH activity.
  • We present an Integral Field Unit survey of 73 galaxy clusters and groups with the VIsible Multi Object Spectrograph (VIMOS) on VLT. We exploit the data to determine the H$\alpha$ gas dynamics on kpc-scales to study the feedback processes occurring within the dense cluster cores. We determine the kinematic state of the ionised gas and show that the majority of systems ($\sim$ 2/3) have relatively ordered velocity fields on kpc scales that are similar to the kinematics of rotating discs and are decoupled from the stellar kinematics of the Brightest Cluster Galaxy. The majority of the H$\alpha$ flux ($>$ 50%) is typically associated with these ordered kinematics and most systems show relatively simple morphologies suggesting they have not been disturbed by a recent merger or interaction. Approximately 20% of the sample (13/73) have disturbed morphologies which can typically be attributed to AGN activity disrupting the gas. Only one system shows any evidence of an interaction with another cluster member. A spectral analysis of the gas suggests that the ionisation of the gas within cluster cores is dominated by non stellar processes, possibly originating from the intracluster medium itself.
  • We present ALMA observations of the CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) line emission tracing filaments of cold molecular gas in the central galaxy of the cluster PKS0745-191. The total molecular gas mass of 4.6 +/- 0.3 x 10^9 solar masses, assuming a Galactic X_{CO} factor, is divided roughly equally between three filaments each extending radially 3-5 kpc from the galaxy centre. The emission peak is located in the SE filament roughly 1 arcsec (2 kpc) from the nucleus. The velocities of the molecular clouds in the filaments are low, lying within +/-100 km/s of the galaxy's systemic velocity. Their FWHMs are less than 150 km/s, which is significantly below the stellar velocity dispersion. Although the molecular mass of each filament is comparable to a rich spiral galaxy, such low velocities show that the filaments are transient and the clouds would disperse on <10^7 yr timescales unless supported, likely by the indirect effect of magnetic fields. The velocity structure is inconsistent with a merger origin or gravitational free-fall of cooling gas in this massive central galaxy. If the molecular clouds originated in gas cooling even a few kpc from their current locations their velocities would exceed those observed. Instead, the projection of the N and SE filaments underneath X-ray cavities suggests they formed in the updraft behind bubbles buoyantly rising through the cluster atmosphere. Direct uplift of the dense gas by the radio bubbles appears to require an implausibly high coupling efficiency. The filaments are coincident with low temperature X-ray gas, bright optical line emission and dust lanes indicating that the molecular gas could have formed from lifted warmer gas that cooled in situ.
  • We consider the high radio frequency (15 GHz - 353 GHz) properties and variability of 35 Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs). These are the most core-dominated sources drawn from a parent sample of more than 700 X-ray selected clusters, thus allowing us to relate our results to the general population. We find that >6.0% of our parent sample (>15.1% if only cool-core clusters are considered) contain a radio-source at 150 GHz of at least 3mJy (~1x10^23 W/Hz at our median redshift of z~0.13). Furthermore, >3.4% of the BCGs in our parent sample contain a peaked component (Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum, GPS) in their spectra that peaks above 2 GHz, increasing to >8.5% if only cool-core clusters are considered. We see little evidence for strong variability at 15 GHz on short (week-month) time-scales although we see variations greater than 20% at 150 GHz over 6-month times-frames for 4 of the 23 sources with multi-epoch observations. Much more prevalent is long-term (year-decade time-scale) variability, with average annual amplitude variations greater than 1% at 15 GHz being commonplace. There is a weak trend towards higher variability as the peak of the GPS-like component occurs at higher frequency. We demonstrate the complexity that is seen in the radio spectra of BCGs and discuss the potentially significant implications of these high-peaking components for Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster searches.
  • We combine molecular gas masses inferred from CO emission in 500 star forming galaxies (SFGs) between z=0 and 3, from the IRAM-COLDGASS, PHIBSS1/2 and other surveys, with gas masses derived from Herschel far-IR dust measurements in 512 galaxy stacks over the same stellar mass/redshift range. We constrain the scaling relations of molecular gas depletion time scale (tdepl) and gas to stellar mass ratio (Mmolgas/M*) of SFGs near the star formation main-sequence with redshift, specific star formation rate (sSFR) and stellar mass (M*). The CO- and dust-based scaling relations agree remarkably well. This suggests that the CO-H2 mass conversion factor varies little within 0.6dex of the main sequence (sSFR(ms,z,M*)), and less than 0.3dex throughout this redshift range. This study builds on and strengthens the results of earlier work. We find that tdepl scales as (1+z)^-0.3 *(sSFR/sSFR(ms,z,M*))^-0.5, with little dependence on M*. The resulting steep redshift dependence of Mmolgas/M* ~(1+z)^3 mirrors that of the sSFR and probably reflects the gas supply rate. The decreasing gas fractions at high M* are driven by the flattening of the SFR-M* relation. Throughout the redshift range probed a larger sSFR at constant M* is due to a combination of an increasing gas fraction and a decreasing depletion time scale. As a result galaxy integrated samples of the Mmolgas-SFR rate relation exhibit a super-linear slope, which increases with the range of sSFR. With these new relations it is now possible to determine Mmolgas with an accuracy of 0.1dex in relative terms, and 0.2dex including systematic uncertainties.
  • We present IRAM 30m telescope observations of the CO(1-0) and (2-1) lines in a sample of 11 group-dominant elliptical galaxies selected from the CLoGS nearby groups sample. Our observations confirm the presence of molecular gas in 4 of the 11 galaxies at >4 sigma significance, and combining these with data from the literature we find a detection rate of 43+-14%, comparable to the detection rate for nearby radio galaxies, suggesting that group-dominant ellipticals may be more likely to contain molecular gas than their non-central counterparts. Those group-dominant galaxies which are detected typically contain ~2x10^8 Msol of molecular gas, and although most have low star formation rates (<1 Msol/yr) they have short depletion times, indicating that the gas must be replenished on timescales ~100 Myr. Almost all of the galaxies contain active nuclei, and we note while the data suggest that CO may be more common in the most radio-loud galaxies, the mass of molecular gas required to power the active nuclei through accretion is small compared to the masses observed. We consider possible origin mechanisms for the gas, through cooling of stellar ejecta within the galaxies, group-scale cooling flows, and gas-rich mergers, and find probable examples of each type within our sample, confirming that a variety of processes act to drive the build up of molecular gas in group-dominant ellipticals.
  • How efficiently star formation proceeds in galaxies is still an open question. Recent studies suggest that AGN can regulate the gas accretion and thus slow down star formation (negative feedback). However, evidence of AGN positive feedback has also been observed in a few radio galaxies (eg. Centaurus A). Here we present CO observations of 3C 285 and Minkowski Object (MO), which are examples of jet-induced star formation. A spot (named 09.6) aligned with the 3C 285 radio jet, at a projected distance of ~70 kpc from the galaxy centre, shows star formation, detected in optical emission. MO is located along the jet of NGC 541 and also shows star formation. To know the distribution of molecular gas along the jets is a way to study the physical processes at play in the AGN interaction with the intergalactic medium. We observed CO lines in 3C 285, NGC 541, 09.6 and MO with the IRAM-30m telescope. In the central galaxies, the spectra present a double-horn profile, typical of a rotation pattern, from which we are able to estimate the molecular gas density profile of the galaxy. The molecular gas appears to be in a compact reservoir. In addition, no kinematic signature of a molecular outflow is detected by the 30m-telescope. Interestingly, 09.6 and MO are not detected in CO. The cold gas mass upper limits are consistent with a star formation induced by the compression of dense ambient material by the jet. The depletion time scales are of the order of and even smaller than what is found in 3C 285, NGC 541 and local spiral galaxies (10^9 yr). The molecular gas surface density in 09.6 follows a Schmidt-Kennicutt law if the emitting region is very compact, while MO is found to have a much higher SFE (very short depletion time). Higher sensitivity and spatial resolution are necessary to detect CO in the spots of star formation, and map the emission in these jet-induced star forming regions.
  • We report ALMA Early Science observations of the Abell 1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect $5\times 10^{10}~\rm M_\odot$ of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its ensemble velocity profile width of $\sim 130 ~\rm km~s^{-1}$ FWHM is too narrow for the molecular cloud sto be supported in the galaxy by dynamic pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. Roughly $10^{10}~\rm M_\odot$ of molecular gas is projected $3-10 ~\rm kpc$ to the north-west and to the east of the nucleus with line of sight velocities lying between $-250 ~\rm km~s^{-1}$ to $+480 ~\rm km~s^{-1}$ with respect to the systemic velocity. The high velocity gas may be either inflowing or outflowing. However, the absence of high velocity gas toward the nucleus that would be expected in a steady inflow, and its bipolar distribution on either side of the nucleus, are more naturally explained as outflow. Star formation and radiation from the AGN are both incapable of driving an outflow of this magnitude. If so, the molecular outflow may be associated a hot outflow on larger scales reported by Kirkpatrick and colleagues. The molecular gas flow rate of approximately $200~\rm M_\odot ~yr^{-1}$ is comparable to the star formation rate of $100-180~\rm M_\odot ~yr^{-1}$ in the central disk. How radio bubbles would lift dense molecular gas in their updrafts, how much gas will be lost to the BCG, and how much will return to fuel future star formation and AGN activity are poorly understood. Our results imply that radio-mechanical (radio mode) feedback not only heats hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies and BCGs, it is able to sweep higher density molecular gas away from their centers.
  • We present a comparison of the molecular gas properties in the outflow vs. in the ambient medium of the local prototype radio-loud and ultraluminous-infrared galaxy 4C12.50 (IRAS13451+1232), using new data from the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer and 30m telescope, and the Herschel space telescope. Previous H_2 (0-0) S(1) and S(2) observations with the Spitzer space telescope had indicated that the warm (~400K) molecular gas in 4C12.50 is made up of a 1.4(+-0.2)x10^8 M_sun ambient reservoir and a 5.2(+-1.7)x10^7 M_sun outflow. The new CO(1-0) data cube indicates that the corresponding cold (25K) H_2 gas mass is 1.0(+-0.1)x10^10 M_sun for the ambient medium and <1.3x10^8 M_sun for the outflow, when using a CO-intensity-to-H_2-mass conversion factor alpha of 0.8 M_sun /(K km/s pc^2). The combined mass outflow rate is high, 230-800 M_sun/yr, but the amount of gas that could escape the galaxy is low. A potential inflow of gas from a 3.3(+-0.3)x10^8 M_sun tidal tail could moderate any mass loss. The mass ratio of warm-to-cold molecular gas is >= 30 times higher in the outflow than in the ambient medium, indicating that a non-negligible fraction of the accelerated gas is heated to temperatures at which star formation is inefficient. This conclusion is robust against the use of different alpha factor values, and/or different warm gas tracers (H_2 vs. H_2 plus CO): with the CO-probed gas mass being at least 40 times lower at 400K than at 25K, the total warm-to-cold mass ratio is always lower in the ambient gas than in the entrained gas. Heating of the molecular gas could facilitate the detection of new outflows in distant galaxies by enhancing their emission in intermediate rotational number CO lines.
  • We present multi-frequency observations of the radio galaxy Hydra-A (3C218) located in the core of a massive, X-ray luminous galaxy cluster. IFU spectroscopy is used to trace the kinematics of the ionised and warm molecular hydrogen which are consistent with a ~ 5 kpc rotating disc. Broad, double-peaked lines of CO(2-1), [CII]157 $\mu$m and [OI]63 $\mu$m are detected. We estimate the mass of the cold gas within the disc to be M$_{gas}$ = 2.3 $\pm$ 0.3 x 10$^9$ M$_{\odot}$. These observations demonstrate that the complex line profiles found in the cold atomic and molecular gas are related to the rotating disc or ring of gas. Finally, an HST image of the galaxy shows that this gas disc contains a substantial mass of dust. The large gas mass, SFR and kinematics are consistent with the levels of gas cooling from the ICM. We conclude that the cold gas originates from the continual quiescent accumulation of cooled ICM gas. The rotation is in a plane perpendicular to the projected orientation of the radio jets and ICM cavities hinting at a possible connection between the kpc-scale cooling gas and the accretion of material onto the black hole. We discuss the implications of these observations for models of cold accretion, AGN feedback and cooling flows.
  • We report ALMA Early Science observations of the Abell 1835 brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in the CO (3-2) and CO (1-0) emission lines. We detect 5E10 solar masses of molecular gas within 10 kpc of the BCG. Its velocity width of ~130 km/s FWHM is too narrow to be supported by dynamical pressure. The gas may instead be supported in a rotating, turbulent disk oriented nearly face-on. The disk is forming stars at a rate of 100-180 solar masses per year. Roughly 1E10 solar masses of molecular gas is projected 3-10 kpc to the north-west and to the east of the nucleus with line of sight velocities lying between -250 km/s to +480 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. Although inflow cannot be ruled out, the rising velocity gradient with radius is consistent with a broad, bipolar outflow driven by radio jets or buoyantly rising X-ray cavities. The molecular outflow may be associated with an outflow of hot gas in Abell 1835 seen on larger scales. Molecular gas is flowing out of the BCG at a rate of approximately 200 solar masses per year, which is comparable to its star formation rate. How radio bubbles lift dense molecular gas in their updrafts, how much gas will be lost to the BCG, and how much will return to fuel future star formation and AGN activity are poorly understood. Our results imply that radio-mechanical (radio mode) feedback not only heats hot atmospheres surrounding elliptical galaxies and BCGs, it is able to sweep higher density molecular gas away from their centers.
  • We report ALMA Early Science CO(1-0) and CO(3-2) observations of the brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) in Abell 1664. The BCG contains 1.1x10^{10} solar masses of molecular gas divided roughly equally between two distinct velocity systems: one from -250 to +250 km/s centred on the BCG's systemic velocity and a high velocity system blueshifted by 570 km/s with respect to the systemic velocity. The BCG's systemic component shows a smooth velocity gradient across the BCG center with velocity proportional to radius suggestive of solid body rotation about the nucleus. However, the mass and velocity structure are highly asymmetric and there is little star formation coincident with a putative disk. It may be an inflow of gas that will settle into a disk over several 10^8 yr. The high velocity system consists of two gas clumps, each ~2 kpc across, located to the north and southeast of the nucleus. Each has a line of sight velocity spread of 250-300 km/s. The velocity of the gas in the high velocity system tends to increase towards the BCG center and could signify a massive high velocity flow onto the nucleus. However, the velocity gradient is not smooth and these structures are also coincident with low optical-UV surface brightness regions, which could indicate dust extinction associated with each clump. If so, the high velocity gas would be projected in front of the BCG and moving toward us along the line of sight in a massive outflow most likely driven by the AGN. A merger origin is unlikely but cannot be ruled out.
  • We report the results of a multi-wavelength study of the nearby galaxy group, Abell 3581 (z=0.0218). This system hosts the most luminous cool core of any nearby group and exhibits active radio mode feedback from the super-massive black hole in its brightest group galaxy, IC 4374. The brightest galaxy has suffered multiple active galactic nucleus outbursts, blowing bubbles into the surrounding hot gas, which have resulted in the uplift of cool ionised gas into the surrounding hot intragroup medium. High velocities, indicative of an outflow, are observed close to the nucleus and coincident with the radio jet. Thin dusty filaments accompany the uplifted, ionised gas. No extended star formation is observed, however, a young cluster is detected just north of the nucleus. The direction of rise of the bubbles has changed between outbursts. This directional change is likely due to sloshing motions of the intragroup medium. These sloshing motions also appear to be actively stripping the X-ray cool core, as indicated by a spiraling cold front of high metallicity, low temperature, low entropy gas.
  • We report on high angular resolution observations of the CO(7-6) line and millimeter continuum in the host galaxy of the gravitationally lensed (z~2.8) quasar RXJ0911.4+0551 using the Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Our CO observations resolve the molecular disk of the source. Using a lens model based on HST observations we fit source models to the observed visibilities. We estimate a molecular disk radius of 1$\pm$0.2 kpc and an inclination of 69$\pm$6\deg, the continuum is more compact and is only marginally resolved by our observations. The relatively low molecular gas mass, $Mgas=(2.3\pm 0.5)\times 10^{9}$ Msolar, and far infrared luminosity, $LFIR=(7.2\pm 1.5) \times 10^{11}$ Lsolar, of this quasar could be explained by its relatively low dynamical mass, $Mdyn=(3.9\pm 0.9)\times 10^9$ Msolar. It would be a scaled-down version the QSOs usually found at high-z. The FIR and CO luminosities lie on the correlation found for QSOs from low to high redshifts and the gas-to-dust ratio ($45\pm 17$) is similar to the one measured in the z=6.4 QSO, SDSS J1148+5251. Differential magnification affects the continuum-to-line luminosity ratio, the line profile and possibly the spectral energy distribution.
  • The radio-quiet quasar BR1202-0725 (z=4.695) is a remarkable source with a bright Northwest (NW) companion detected at submm and radio wavelengths but invisible in the optical. In the absence of amplification by gravitational lensing, BR1202-0725 would be the most luminous binary CO and FIR source in the Universe. In this paper, we report observations with the IRAM Plateau de Bure interferometer of BR1202-0725 in the redshifted emission of the CO(5-4) and (7-6) lines, the [C I](3P2-3P1) line, a high angular resolution (0.3 x 0.8 arcsec) 1.3 mm map of the rest-frame, far-IR dust continuum, and a search for the CO(11-10) line. We compare these results with recent ALMA data in the [C II] line. Both the quasar host galaxy and its NW companion are spatially resolved in the molecular line emission and the dust continuum. The CO profile of the NW companion is very broad with a full width at half maximum of 1000 +/- 130 km/s, compared to 360 +/- 40 km/s for the quasar host galaxy to the Southeast (SE). The difference in linewidths and center velocities, and the absence of any lens candidate or arc-like structure in the field, at any wavelength, show that the obscured NW galaxy and the SE quasar host galaxy cannot be lensed images of the same object. Instead, we find morphological and kinematic evidence for sub-structures in both the NW and SE sources. We interpret these results as strong indications that the BR1202-0725 complex is a group of young, interacting, and highly active starburst galaxies.