• An analysis of the Type Ic supernova (SN) 2004aw is performed by means of models of the photospheric and nebular spectra and of the bolometric light curve. SN2004aw is shown not to be ``broad-lined'', contrary to previous claims, but rather a ``fast-lined'' SN Ic. The spectral resemblance to the narrow-lined Type Ic SN1994I, combined with the strong nebular [O I] emission and the broad light curve, point to a moderately energetic explosion of a massive C+O star. The ejected 56Ni mass is ~0.2 Msun. The ejecta mass as constrained by the models is ~3-5 Msun, while the kinetic energy is estimated as KE ~3-6 e51 ergs. The ratio KE/Mej, the specific energy which influences the shape of the spectrum, is therefore ~1. The corresponding zero-age main-sequence mass of the progenitor star may have been ~23-28 Msun. Tests show that a flatter outer density structure may have caused a broad-lined spectrum at epochs before those observed without affecting the later epochs when data are available, implying that our estimate of KE is a lower limit. SN2004aw may have been powered by either a collapsar or a magnetar, both of which have been proposed for gamma-ray burst-supernovae. Evidence for this is seen in the innermost layers, which appear to be highly aspherical as suggested by the nebular line profiles. However, any engine was not extremely powerful, as the outer ejecta are more consistent with a spherical explosion and no gamma-ray burst was detected in coincidence with SN2004aw.
  • We report observations and analysis of the nearby gamma-ray burst GRB\,161219B (redshift $z=0.1475$) and the associated Type Ic supernova (SN) 2016jca. GRB\,161219B had an isotropic gamma-ray energy of $\sim 1.6 \times 10^{50}$\,erg. Its afterglow is likely refreshed at an epoch preceding the first photometric points (0.6\,d), which slows down the decay rates. Combined analysis of the SN light curve and multiwavelength observations of the afterglow suggest that the GRB jet was broad during the afterglow phase (full opening angle $\sim 42^\circ \pm 3^\circ$). Our spectral series shows broad absorption lines typical of GRB supernovae (SNe), which testify to the presence of material with velocities up to $\sim 0.25$c. The spectrum at 3.73\,d allows for the very early identification of a SN associated with a GRB. Reproducing it requires a large photospheric velocity ($35,000 \pm 7000$\,\kms). The kinetic energy of the SN is estimated through models to be \KE $\approx 4 \times 10^{52}$\,erg in spherical symmetry. The ejected mass in the explosion was \Mej $\approx 6.5 \pm 1.5$\,\Msun, much less than that of other GRB-SNe, demonstrating diversity among these events. The total amount of \Nifs\ in the explosion was $0.27 \pm 0.05$\,\Msun. The observed spectra require the presence of freshly synthesised \Nifs\ at the highest velocities, at least 3 times more than a standard GRB-SN. We also find evidence for a decreasing \Nifs\ abundance as a function of decreasing velocity. This suggests that SN\,2016jca was a highly aspherical explosion viewed close to on-axis, powered by a compact remnant. Applying a typical correction for asymmetry, the energy of SN\,2016jca was $\sim$ (1--3) $\times 10^{52}$\,erg, confirming that most of the energy produced by GRB-SNe goes into the kinetic energy of the SN ejecta.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts are a rare subclass of stripped-envelope core-collapse supernovae that launch collimated relativistic outflows (jets). All gamma-ray-burst-associated supernovae are spectroscopically of Type Ic with broad lines, but the fraction of broad-lined Type Ic supernovae harboring low-luminosity gamma-ray-burst remains largely unconstrained. Some supernovae should be accompanied by off-axis $\gamma$-ray burst jets that remain invisible initially, but then emerge as strong radio sources (as the jets decelerate). However, this critical prediction of the jet model for gamma-ray bursts has yet to be verified observationally. Here, we present K. G. Jansky Very Large Array observations of 15 broad-lined supernovae of Type Ic discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory in an untargeted manner. Most of the supernovae in our sample exclude radio emission observationally similar to that of the radio-loud, relativistic SN\,1998bw. We constrain the fraction of 1998bw-like broad-lined Type Ic supernovae to be <~ 41% (99.865% confidence). Most of the events in our sample also exclude off-axis jets similar to GRB 031203 and GRB 030329, but we cannot rule out off-axis gamma-ray-bursts expanding in a low-density wind environment. Three supernovae in our sample are detected in the radio. PTF11qcj and PTF14dby show late-time radio emission with average ejecta speeds of ~(0.3-0.4)c, on the dividing line between relativistic and "ordinary" supernovae. The speed of PTF11cmh radio ejecta is poorly constrained. We estimate that <~ 85% (99.865% confidence) of the broad-lined Type Ic supernovae in our sample may harbor off-axis $\gamma$-ray-bursts expanding in media with densities in the range probed by this study.
  • The first direct detection of gravitational waves was made in late 2015 with the Advanced LIGO detectors. By prior arrangement, a worldwide collaboration of electromagnetic follow-up observers were notified of candidate gravitational wave events during the first science run, and many facilities were engaged in the search for counterparts. No counterparts were identified, which is in line with expectations given that the events were classified as black hole - black hole mergers. However these searches laid the foundation for similar follow-up campaigns in future gravitational wave detector science runs, in which the detection of neutron star merger events with observable electromagnetic counterparts is much more likely. Three alerts were issued to the electromagnetic collaboration over the course of the first science run, which lasted from September 2015 to January 2016. Two of these alerts were associated with the gravitational wave events since named GW150914 and GW151226. In this paper we provide an overview of the Liverpool Telescope contribution to the follow-up campaign over this period. Given the hundreds of square degree uncertainty in the sky position of any gravitational wave event, efficient searching for candidate counterparts required survey telescopes with large (~degrees) fields-of-view. The role of the Liverpool Telescope was to provide follow-up classification spectroscopy of any candidates. We followed candidates associated with all three alerts, observing 1, 9 and 17 candidates respectively. We classify the majority of the transients we observed as supernovae.
  • Na I D absorbing systems toward Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) have been intensively studied over the last decade with the aim of finding circumstellar material (CSM), which is an indirect probe of the progenitor system. However, it is difficult to deconvolve CSM components from non-variable, and often dominant, components created by interstellar material (ISM). We present a series of high-resolution spectra of SN Ia 2014J from before maximum brightness to ~250 days after maximum brightness. The late-time spectrum provides unique information for determining the origin of the Na I D absorption systems. The deep late-time observation allows us to probe the environment around the SN at a large scale, extending to ~40 pc. We find that a spectrum of diffuse light in the vicinity, but not directly in the line-of-sight, of the SN has absorbing systems nearly identical to those obtained for the "pure" SN line-of-sight. Therefore, basically all Na I D systems seen toward SN 2014J must originate from foreground material that extends to at least ~40 pc in projection and none at the CSM scale. A fluctuation in the column densities at a scale of ~20 pc is also identified. After subtracting the diffuse, "background" spectrum, the late-time SN Na I D profile along the SN line-of-sight is consistent with the profile in the near-maximum brightness spectra. The lack of variability on a ~1 year timescale is consistent with the ISM interpretation for the gas.
  • A series of optical and one near-infrared nebular spectra covering the first year of the Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe are presented and modelled. The density profile that proved best for the early optical/ultraviolet spectra, "rho-11fe", was extended to lower velocities to include the regions that emit at nebular epochs. Model rho-11fe is intermediate between the fast deflagration model W7 and a low-energy delayed-detonation. Good fits to the nebular spectra are obtained if the innermost ejecta are dominated by neutron-rich, stable Fe-group species, which contribute to cooling but not to heating. The correct thermal balance can thus be reached for the strongest [FeII] and [FeIII] lines to be reproduced with the observed ratio. The 56Ni mass thus obtained is 0.47 +/- 0.05 Mo. The bulk of 56Ni has an outermost velocity of ~8500 km/s. The mass of stable iron is 0.23 +/- 0.03 Mo. Stable Ni has low abundance, ~10^{-2} Mo. This is sufficient to reproduce an observed emission line near 7400 A. A sub-Chandrasekhar explosion model with mass 1.02 Mo and no central stable Fe does not reproduce the observed line ratios. A mock model where neutron-rich Fe-group species are located above 56Ni following recent suggestions is also shown to yield spectra that are less compatible with the observations. The densities and abundances in the inner layers obtained from the nebular analysis, combined with those of the outer layers previously obtained, are used to compute a synthetic bolometric light curve, which compares favourably with the light curve of SN 2011fe.
  • Long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and broad-line, type Ic supernovae (SNe) are strongly connected. We aim at characterizing SN 2013dx, associated with GRB\,130702A, through sensitive and extensive ground-based observational campaigns in the optical-IR band. We monitored the field of the Swift GRB 130702A (redshift z = 0.145) using the 8.2-m VLT, the 3.6-m TNG and the 0.6-m REM telescopes during the time interval between 4 and 40 days after the burst. Photometric and spectroscopic observations revealed the presence of the associated Type Ic SN 2013dx. Our multi-band photometry allowed the construction of a bolometric light curve.} The bolometric light curve of SN 2013dx resembles that of 2003dh (associated with GRB 030329), but is ~10% faster and ~25% dimmer. From this we infer a synthesized 56Ni mass of ~0.2 solar masses. The multi-epoch optical spectroscopy shows that the SN 2013dx behavior is best matched by SN 1998bw, among the other well-known low-redshift SNe associated with GRBs and XRFs, and by SN 2010ah, an energetic Type Ic SN not associated with any GRB. The photospheric velocity of the ejected material declines from ~2.7X10^4 km/s at 8 rest frame days from the explosion, to ~3.5X10^3 km/s at 40 days. These values are extremely close to those of SN1998bw and 2010ah. We deduce for SN 2013dx a kinetic energy of ~35X10^51 erg, and an ejected mass of ~7 solar masses. This suggests that the progenitor of SN2013dx had a mass of ~25 solar masses, i.e., 15-20% less massive than that of SN 1998bw. Finally, we performed a study of the SN 2013dx environment, through spectroscopy of the closeby galaxies. 9 out of the 14 inspected galaxies lie within 0.03 in redshift from z=0.145, indicating that the host of GRB 130702A/SN 2013dx belongs to a group of galaxies, an unprecedented finding for a GRB-associated SN and, to our knowledge, for long GRBs in general.
  • The Liverpool Telescope is one of the world's premier facilities for time domain astronomy. The time domain landscape is set to radically change in the coming decade, with surveys such as LSST providing huge numbers of transient detections on a nightly basis; transient detections across the electromagnetic spectrum from other facilities such as SVOM, SKA and CTA; and the era of `multi-messenger astronomy', wherein events are detected via non-electromagnetic means, such as gravitational wave emission. We describe here our plans for Liverpool Telescope 2: a new robotic telescope designed to capitalise on this new era of time domain astronomy. LT2 will be a 4-metre class facility co-located with the LT at the Observatorio del Roque de Los Muchachos on the Canary island of La Palma. The telescope will be designed for extremely rapid response: the aim is that the telescope will take data within 30 seconds of the receipt of a trigger from another facility. The motivation for this is twofold: firstly it will make it a world-leading facility for the study of fast fading transients and explosive phenomena discovered at early times. Secondly, it will enable large-scale programmes of low-to-intermediate resolution spectral classification of transients to be performed with great efficiency. In the target-rich environment of the LSST era, minimising acquisition overheads will be key to maximising the science gains from any follow-up programme. The telescope will have a diverse instrument suite which is simultaneously mounted for automatic changes, but it is envisaged that the primary instrument will be an intermediate resolution, optical/infrared spectrograph for scientific exploitation of transients discovered with the next generation of synoptic survey facilities. In this paper we outline the core science drivers for the telescope, and the requirements for the optical and mechanical design.
  • We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SNIc-BL) PTF10qts, which was discovered as part of the Palomar Transient Factory. The supernova was located in a dwarf galaxy of magnitude $r=21.1$ at a redshift $z=0.0907$. We find that the $R$-band light curve is a poor proxy for bolometric data and use photometric and spectroscopic data to construct and constrain the bolometric light curve. The derived bolometric magnitude at maximum light is $M_{\rm bol} = -18.51\pm0.2$ mag, comparable to that of SN 1998bw ($M_{\rm bol} = -18.7$ mag) which was associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). PTF10qts is one of the most luminous SNIc-BL observed without an accompanying GRB. We estimate the physical parameters of the explosion using data from our programme of follow-up observations, finding that it produced a larger mass of radioactive nickel compared to other SNeIc-BL with similar inferred ejecta masses and kinetic energies. The progenitor of the event was likely a $\sim20$M$_{\odot}$ star.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been found to be associated with broad-lined type-Ic supernovae (SNe), but only a handful of cases have been studied in detail. Prompted by the discovery of the exceptionally bright, nearby GRB130427A (redshift z=0.3399), we aim at characterising the properties of its associated SN2013cq. This is the first opportunity to test directly the progenitors of high-luminosity GRBs. We monitored the field of the Swift long duration GRB130427A using the 3.6-m TNG and the 8.2-m VLT during the time interval between 3.6 and 51.6 days after the burst. Photometric and spectroscopic observations revealed the presence of the type Ic SN2013cq. Spectroscopic analysis suggests that SN2013cq resembles two previous GRB-SNe, SN1998bw and SN2010bh associated with GRB980425 and XRF100316D, respectively. The bolometric light curve of SN2013cq, which is significantly affected by the host galaxy contribution, is systematically more luminous than that of SN2010bh ($\sim$ 2 mag at peak), but is consistent with SN1998bw. The comparison with the light curve model of another GRB-connected SN2003dh, indicates that SN2013cq is consistent with the model when brightened by 20%. This suggests a synthesised radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass of $\sim 0.4 M_\odot$. GRB130427A/SN2013cq is the first case of low-z GRB-SN connection where the GRB energetics are extreme ($E_{\rm \gamma, iso} \sim 10^{54}$ erg). We show that the maximum luminosities attained by SNe associated with GRBs span a very narrow range, but those associated with XRFs are significantly less luminous. On the other hand the isotropic energies of the accompanying GRBs span 6 orders of magnitude (10$^{48}$ erg $< E_{\rm \gamma, iso} <$ 10$^{54}$ erg), although this range is reduced when corrected for jet collimation. The GRB total radiated energy is in fact a small fraction of the SN energy budget.
  • We present ground-based and HST optical observations of the optical transients (OTs) of long-duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) 060729 and 090618, both at a redshift of z = 0.54. For GRB 060729, bumps are seen in the optical light curves (LCs), and the late-time broadband spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of the OT resemble those of local type Ic supernovae (SNe). For GRB 090618, the dense sampling of our optical observations has allowed us to detect well-defined bumps in the optical LCs, as well as a change in colour, that are indicative of light coming from a core-collapse SN. The accompanying SNe for both events are individually compared with SN1998bw, a known GRB-supernova, and SN1994I, a typical type Ic supernova without a known GRB counterpart, and in both cases the brightness and temporal evolution more closely resemble SN1998bw. We also exploit our extensive optical and radio data for GRB 090618, as well as the publicly-available SWIFT -XRT data, and discuss the properties of the afterglow at early times. In the context of a simple jet-like model, the afterglow of GRB 090618 is best explained by the presence of a jet-break at t-to > 0.5 days. We then compare the rest-frame, peak V -band absolute magnitudes of all of the GRB and X-Ray Flash (XRF)-associated SNe with a large sample of local type Ibc SNe, concluding that, when host extinction is considered, the peak magnitudes of the GRB/XRF-SNe cannot be distinguished from the peak magnitudes of non-GRB/XRF SNe.
  • We report the Swift discovery of nearby long, soft gamma-ray burst GRB 100316D, and the subsequent unveiling of its low redshift host galaxy and associated supernova. We derive the redshift of the event to be z = 0.0591 +/- 0.0001 and provide accurate astrometry for the GRB-SN. We study the extremely unusual prompt emission with time-resolved gamma-ray to X-ray spectroscopy, and find that the spectrum is best modelled with a thermal component in addition to a synchrotron emission component with a low peak energy. The X-ray light curve has a remarkably shallow decay out to at least 800 s. The host is a bright, blue galaxy with a highly disturbed morphology and we use Gemini South, VLT and HST observations to measure some of the basic host galaxy properties. We compare and contrast the X-ray emission and host galaxy of GRB 100316D to a subsample of GRB-SNe. GRB 100316D is unlike the majority of GRB-SNe in its X-ray evolution, but resembles rather GRB 060218, and we find that these two events have remarkably similar high energy prompt emission properties. Comparison of the host galaxies of GRB-SNe demonstrates, however, that there is a great diversity in the environments in which GRB-SNe can be found. GRB 100316D is an important addition to the currently sparse sample of spectroscopically confirmed GRB-SNe, from which a better understanding of long GRB progenitors and the GRB--SN connection can be gleaned.
  • Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) form an observationally uniform class of stellar explosions, in that more luminous objects have smaller decline-rates. This one-parameter behavior allows SNe Ia to be calibrated as cosmological `standard candles', and led to the discovery of an accelerating Universe. Recent investigations, however, have revealed that the true nature of SNe Ia is more complicated. Theoretically, it has been suggested that the initial thermonuclear sparks are ignited at an offset from the centre of the white-dwarf (WD) progenitor, possibly as a result of convection before the explosion. Observationally, the diversity seen in the spectral evolution of SNe Ia beyond the luminosity decline-rate relation is an unresolved issue. Here we report that the spectral diversity is a consequence of random directions from which an asymmetric explosion is viewed. Our findings suggest that the spectral evolution diversity is no longer a concern in using SNe Ia as cosmological standard candles. Furthermore, this indicates that ignition at an offset from the centre of is a generic feature of SNe Ia.
  • The spectral properties of type Ia supernovae in the ultraviolet (UV) are investigated using the early-time spectra of SN 2001ep and SN 2001eh obtained using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). A series of spectral models is computed with a Monte Carlo spectral synthesis code, and the dependence of the UV flux on the elemental abundances and the density gradient in the outer layers of the ejecta is tested. A large fraction of the UV flux is formed by reverse fluorescence scattering of photons from red to blue wavelengths. This process, combined with ionization shifts due to enhanced line blocking, can lead to a stronger UV flux as the iron-group abundance in the outer layers is increased, contrary to previous claims.
  • The first two months of spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the nearby type Ic SN 2007gr are presented. The very early discovery (less than 5 days after the explosion) and the relatively short distance of the host galaxy motivated an extensive observational campaign. SN 2007gr shows an average peak luminosity but unusually narrow spectral lines and an almost flat photospheric velocity profile. The detection of prominent carbon features in the spectra is shown and suggest a wide range in carbon abundance in stripped-envelope supernovae. SN 2007gr may be an important piece in the puzzle of the observed diversity of CC SNe.
  • The nebular spectra of the broad-lined, SN 1998bw-like Type Ic SN 2002ap are studied by means of synthetic spectra. Two different modelling techniques are employed. In one technique, the SN ejecta are treated as a single zone, while in the other a density and abundance distribution in velocity is used from an explosion model. In both cases, heating caused by gamma-ray and positron deposition is computed (in the latter case using a Monte Carlo technique to describe the propagation of gamma-rays and positrons), as is cooling via forbidden-line emission. The results are compared, and although general agreement is found, the stratified models are shown to reproduce the observed line profiles much more accurately than the single-zone model. The explosion produced ~ 0.1 Msun of 56Ni. The distribution in velocity of the various elements is in agreement with that obtained from the early-time models, which indicated an ejected mass of ~ 2.5 Msun with a kinetic energy of 4 x 10^{51} erg. Nebular spectroscopy confirms that most of the ejected mass (~ 1.2 Msun) was oxygen. The presence of an oxygen-rich inner core, combined with that of 56Ni at high velocities as deduced from early-time models, suggests that the explosion was asymmetric, especially in the inner part.
  • Type Ia supernovae are thought to be thermonuclear explosions of accreting white dwarfs that reach a critical mass limit. Despite their importance as cosmological distance indicators, the nature of their progenitors has remained controversial. Here we report the detection of circumstellar material in a normal Type Ia supernova. The expansion velocities, densities and dimensions of the circumstellar envelope indicate that this material was ejected from the progenitor system. The relatively low expansion velocities appear to favor a progenitor system where a white dwarf accretes material from a companion star which is in the red-giant phase at the time of explosion.
  • Late phase nebular spectra and photometry of Type Ib Supernova (SN) 2005bf taken by the Subaru telescope at ~ 270 and ~ 310 days since the explosion are presented. Emission lines ([OI]6300, 6363, [CaII]7291, 7324, [FeII]7155) show the blueshift of ~ 1,500 - 2,000 km s-1. The [OI] doublet shows a doubly-peaked profile. The line luminosities can be interpreted as coming from a blob or jet containing only ~ 0.1 - 0.4 Msun, in which ~ 0.02 - 0.06 Msun is 56Ni synthesized at the explosion. To explain the blueshift, the blob should either be of unipolar moving at the center-of-mass velocity v ~ 2,000 - 5,000 km s-1, or suffer from self-absorption within the ejecta as seen in SN 1990I. In both interpretations, the low-mass blob component dominates the optical output both at the first peak (~ 20 days) and at the late phase (~ 300 days). The low luminosity at the late phase (the absolute R magnitude M_R ~ -10.2 mag at ~ 270 days) sets the upper limit for the mass of 56Ni < ~ 0.08 Msun, which is in contradiction to the value necessary to explain the second, main peak luminosity (M_R ~ -18.3 mag at ~ 40 days). Encountered by this difficulty in the 56Ni heating model, we suggest an alternative scenario in which the heating source is a newly born, strongly magnetized neutron star (a magnetar) with the surface magnetic field Bmag ~ 10^{14-15} gauss and the initial spin period P0 ~ 10 ms. Then, SN 2005bf could be a link between normal SNe Ib/c and an X-Ray Flash associated SN 2006aj, connected in terms of Bmag and/or P0.
  • The connection between the long Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Type Ic Supernovae (SNe) has revealed interesting diversity. We review the following types of the GRB-SN connection. (1) GRB-SNe: The three SNe all explode with energies much larger than those of typical SNe, thus being called Hypernovae (HNe). They are massive enough for forming black holes. (2) Non-GRB HNe/SNe: Some HNe are not associated with GRBs. (3) XRF-SN: SN 2006aj associated with X-Ray Flash 060218 is dimmer than GRB-SNe and has very weak oxygen lines. Its progenitor mass is estimated to be small enough to form a neutron star rather than a black hole. (4) Non-SN GRB: Two nearby long GRBs were not associated SNe. Such ``dark HNe'' have been predicted in this talk (i.e., just before the discoveries) in order to explain the origin of C-rich (hyper) metal-poor stars. This would be an important confirmation of the Hypernova-First Star connection. We will show our attempt to explain the diversity in a unified manner with the jet-induced explosion model.
  • Although there is strong support for the collapsar engine as the power source of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), we still do not definitively know the progenitor of these explosions. Here we review the current set of progenitor scenarios for long-duration GRBs and the observational constraints on these scenarios. Examining these, we find that single-star models cannot be the only progenitor for long-duration GRBs. Several binary progenitors can match the solid observational constraints and also have the potential to match the trends we are currently seeing in the observations. Type Ib/c supernovae are also likely to be produced primarily in binaries; we discuss the relationship between the progenitors of these explosions and those of the long-duration GRBs.
  • Long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are associated with type Ic supernovae that are more luminous than average and that eject material at very high velocities. Less-luminous supernovae were not hitherto known to be associated with GRBs, and therefore GRB-supernovae were thought to be rare events. Whether X-ray flashes - analogues of GRBs, but with lower luminosities and fewer gamma-rays - can also be associated with supernovae, and whether they are intrinsically 'weak' events or typical GRBs viewed off the axis of the burst, is unclear. Here we report the optical discovery and follow-up observations of the type Ic supernova SN 2006aj associated with X-ray flash XRF 060218. Supernova 2006aj is intrinsically less luminous than the GRB-supernovae, but more luminous than many supernovae not accompanied by a GRB. The ejecta velocities derived from our spectra are intermediate between these two groups, which is consistent with the weakness of both the GRB output and the supernova radio flux. Our data, combined with radio and X-ray observations, suggest that XRF 060218 is an intrinsically weak and soft event, rather than a classical GRB observed off-axis. This extends the GRB-supernova connection to X-ray flashes and fainter supernovae, implying a common origin. Events such as XRF 060218 are probably more numerous than GRB-supernovae.
  • A fully 3D Monte Carlo scheme is applied to compute optical bolometric light curves for aspherical (jet-like) supernova explosion models. Density and abundance distributions are taken from hydrodynamic explosion models, with the energy varied as a parameter to explore the dependence. Our models show initially a very large degree ($\sim 4$ depending on model parameters) of boosting luminosity toward the polar ($z$) direction relative to the equatorial ($r$) plane, which decreases as the time of peak is approached. After the peak, the factor of the luminosity boost remains almost constant ($\sim 1.2$) until the supernova enters the nebular phase. This behavior is due mostly to the aspherical $^{56}$Ni distribution in the earlier phase and to the disk-like inner low-velocity structure in the later phase. Also the aspherical models yield an earlier peak date than the spherical models, especially if viewed from near the z-axis. Aspherical models with ejecta mass $\sim 10\Msun$ are examined, and one with the kinetic energy of the expansion $\sim 2 \pm 0.5 \times 10^{52}$ ergs and a mass of $^{56}$Ni $\sim 0.4\Msun$ yields a light curve in agreement with the observed light curve of SN 1998bw (the prototypical hyper-energetic supernova). The aspherical model is also at least qualitatively consistent with evolution of photospheric velocities, showing large velocities near the z-axis, and with a late-phase nebular spectrum. The viewing angle is close to the z-axis, strengthening the case for the association of SN 1998bw with the gamma ray burst GRB980425.
  • Refined one- and two-dimensional models for the nebular spectra of the hyper-energetic Type Ic supernova (SN) 1998bw, associated with the gamma-ray burst GRB980425, from 125 to 376 days after B-band maximum are presented. One dimensional, spherically symmetric spectrum synthesis calculations show that reproducing features in the observed spectra, i.e., the sharply peaked [OI] 6300\AA doublet and MgI] 4570\AA emission, and the broad [FeII] blend around 5200\AA, requires the existence of a high-density O-rich core expanding at low velocities ($\lsim 8,000$ km s$^{-1}$) and of Fe-rich material moving faster than the O-rich material. Synthetic spectra at late phases from aspherical (bipolar) explosion models are also computed with a two-dimensional spectrum synthesis code. The above features are naturally explained by the aspherical model if the explosion is viewed from a direction close to the axis of symmetry ($\sim 30^{\rm o}$), since the aspherical model yields a high-density O-rich region confined along the equatorial axis. By examining a large parameter space (in energy and mass), our best model gives following physical quantities: the kinetic energy $E_{51} \equiv E_{\rm K}/10^{51}$ ergs $\gsim 8 - 12$ and the main-sequence mass of the progenitor star $M_{\rm ms} \gsim 30 - 35 \Msun$. The temporal spectral evolution of SN 1998bw also indicates mixing among Fe-, O-, and C-rich regions, and highly clumpy structure.
  • Observations and modeling for the light curve (LC) and spectra of supernova (SN) 2005bf are reported. This SN showed unique features: the LC had two maxima, and declined rapidly after the second maximum, while the spectra showed strengthening He lines whose velocity increased with time. The double-peaked LC can be reproduced by a double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution, with most $^{56}$Ni at low velocity and a small amount at high velocity. The rapid post-maximum decline requires a large fraction of the $\gamma$-rays to escape from the $^{56}$Ni-dominated region, possibly because of low-density ``holes''. The presence of Balmer lines in the spectrum suggests that the He layer of the progenitor was substantially intact. Increasing $\gamma$-ray deposition in the He layer due to enhanced $\gamma$-ray escape from the $^{56}$Ni-dominated region may explain both the delayed strengthening and the increasing velocity of the He lines. The SN has massive ejecta ($\sim6-7\Msun$), normal kinetic energy ($\sim 1.0-1.5\times 10^{51}$ ergs), high peak bolometric luminosity ($\sim 5\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$) for an epoch as late as $\sim$ 40 days, and a large $^{56}$Ni mass ($\sim0.32\Msun$). These properties, and the presence of a small amount of H suggest that the progenitor was initially massive (M$\sim 25-30 \Msun$) and had lost most of its H envelope, and was possibly a WN star. The double-peaked $^{56}$Ni distribution suggests that the explosion may have formed jets that did not reach the He layer. The properties of SN 2005bf resemble those of the explosion of Cassiopeia A.
  • Recent studies of core-collapse supernovae have revealed the existence of two distinct classes of massive supernovae (SNe): 1) very energetic SNe (Hypernovae), whose kinetic energy (KE) exceeds $10^{52}$ erg, about 10 times the KE of normal core-collapse SNe, and 2) very faint and low energy SNe (E < 0.5 $\times$ $10^{51}$ erg; Faint supernovae). These two classes of supernovae are likely to be "black-hole-forming" supernovae with rotating or non-rotating black holes. We compare their nucleosynthesis yields with the abundances of extremely metal-poor (EMP) stars to identify the Pop III (or first) supernovae. We show that the EMP stars, especially the C-rich type, are likely to be enriched by black-hole-forming supernovae.