• Faint X-ray emission from hot plasma (T > 1 MK) has been detected extending outward a few arcseconds along the optically-delineated jets of some classical T Tauri stars including RY Tau. The mechanism and location where the jet is heated to X-ray temperatures is unknown. We present high spatial resolution HST far-ultraviolet long-slit observations of RY Tau with the slit aligned along the jet. The primary objective was to search for C IV emission from warm plasma at T(CIV) ~ 10$^{5}$ K within the inner jet (<1 arcsec) that cannot be fully-resolved by X-ray telescopes. Spatially-resolved C IV emission is detected in the blueshifted jet extending outward from the star to 1 arcsec and in the redshifted jet out to 0.5 arcsec. C IV line centroid shifts give a radial velocity in the blueshifted jet of -136 $\pm$ 10 km/s at an offset of 0.29 arcsec (39 au) and deceleration outward is detected. The deprojected jet speed is subject to uncertainties in the jet inclination but values >200 km/s are likely. The mass-loss rate in the blueshifted jet is at least 2.3 $\times$ 10$^{-9}$ M_sun yr$^{-1}$, consistent with optical determinations. We use the HST data along with optically-determined jet morphology to place meaningful constraints on candidate jet-heating models including a hot-launch model in which the jet is heated near the base to X-ray temperatures by an unspecified (but probably magnetic) process, and downstream heating from shocks or a putative jet magnetic field.
  • We present a study of molecular gas in the inner disk $\left(r < 20 \, \text{AU} \right)$ around RY Lupi, with spectra from HST-COS, HST-STIS, and VLT-CRIRES. We model the radial distribution of flux from hot gas in a surface layer between $r = 0.1-10$ AU, as traced by Ly$\alpha$-pumped H$_2$. The result shows H$_2$ emission originating in a ring centered at $\sim$3 AU that declines within $r < 0.1$ AU, which is consistent with the behavior of disks with dust cavities. An analysis of the H$_2$ line shapes shows that a two-component Gaussian profile $\left(\text{FWHM}_{broad, H_2} = 105 \pm 15 \, \text{km s}^{-1}; \, \text{FWHM}_{narrow, H_2} = 43 \pm 13 \, \text{km s}^{-1} \right)$ is statistically preferred to a single-component Gaussian. We interpret this as tentative evidence for gas emitting from radially separated disk regions $\left( \left \langle r_{broad, H_2} \right \rangle \sim 0.4 \pm 0.1 \, \text{AU}; \, \left \langle r_{narrow, H_2} \right \rangle \sim 3 \pm 2 \, \text{AU} \right)$. The 4.7 $\mu$m $^{12}$CO emission lines are also well fit by two-component profiles $\left( \left \langle r_{broad, CO} \right \rangle = 0.4 \pm 0.1 \, \text{AU}; \, \left \langle r_{narrow, CO} \right \rangle = 15 \pm 2 \, \text{AU} \right)$. We combine these results with 10 $\mu$m observations to form a picture of gapped structure within the mm-imaged dust cavity, providing the first such overview of the inner regions of a young disk. The HST SED of RY Lupi is available online for use in modeling efforts.
  • HD 209458 is one of the benchmark objects in the study of hot Jupiter atmospheres and their evaporation through planetary winds. The expansion of the planetary atmosphere is thought to be driven by high-energy EUV and X-ray irradiation. We obtained new Chandra HRC-I data, which unequivocally show that HD 209458 is an X-ray source. Combining these data with archival XMM-Newton observations, we find that the corona of HD 209458 is characterized by a temperature of about 1 MK and an emission measure of 7e49 cm^-3, yielding an X-ray luminosity of 1.6e27 erg/s in the 0.124-2.48 keV band. HD 209458 is an inactive star with a coronal temperature comparable to that of the inactive Sun but a larger emission measure. At this level of activity, the planetary high-energy emission is sufficient to support mass-loss at a rate of a few times 1e10 g/s.
  • One of the best-studied jets from all young stellar objects is the jet of DG Tau, which we imaged in the FUV with HST for the first time. These high spatial resolution images were obtained with long-pass filters and allow us to construct images tracing mainly molecular hydrogen and C IV emission. We find that the H2 emission appears as a limb-brightened cone with additional emission close to the jet axis. The length of the rims is about 0.3 arcsec or 42 AU (proj.) before their brightness strongly drops, and the opening angle is about 90 deg. Comparing our FUV data with near-IR data we find that the fluorescent H2 emission likely traces the outer, cooler part of the disk wind while an origin of the H2 emission in the surface layers (atmosphere) of the (flared) disk is unlikely. Furthermore, the spatial shape of the H2 emission shows little variation over six years which suggests that the outer part of the disk wind is rather stable and probably not associated with the formation of individual knots. The C IV image shows that the emission is concentrated towards the jet axis. We find no indications for additional C IV emission at larger distances, which strengthens the association with the X-ray emission observed to originate within the DG Tau jet.
  • We report on new X-ray observations of the classical T Tauri star DG Tau. DG Tau drives a collimated bi-polar jet known to be a source of X-ray emission perhaps driven by internal shocks. The rather modest extinction permits study of the jet system to distances very close to the star itself. Our initial results presented here show that the spatially resolved X-ray jet has been moving and fading during the past six years. In contrast, a stationary, very soft source much closer (~ 0.15-0.2") to the star but apparently also related to the jet has brightened during the same period. We report accurate temperatures and absorption column densities toward this source, which is probably associated with the jet base or the jet collimation region.
  • The eclipsing brown-dwarf binary system 2MASS J05352184-0546085 is a case sui generis. For the first time, it allows a detailed analysis of the individual properties of young brown dwarfs, in particular, masses, and radii, and the temperature ratio of the system components can be determined accurately. The system shows a "temperature reversal" with the more massive component being the cooler one, and both components are found to be active. We analyze X-ray images obtained by Chandra and XMM-Newton containing 2MASS J05352184-0546085 in their respective field of view. The Chandra observatory data show a clear X-ray source at the position of 2MASS J05352184-0546085, whereas the XMM-Newton data suffer from contamination from other nearby sources, but are consistent with the Chandra detection. No indications of flaring activity are found in either of the observations (together about 70 ks), and we thus attribute the observed flux to quiescent emission. With an X-ray luminosity of 3*10^{28} erg/s we find an L_X/L_{bol}-ratio close to the saturation limit of 10^{-3} and an L_{X}/L_{H\alpha}-ratio consistent with values obtained from low-mass stars. The X-ray detection of 2MASS J05352184-0546085 reported here provides additional support for the interpretation of the temperature reversal in terms of magnetically suppressed convection, and suggests that the activity phenomena of young brown dwarfs resemble those of their more massive counterparts.
  • The classical T Tauri star DG Tau shows all typical signatures of X-ray activity and, in particular, harbors a resolved X-ray jet. We demonstrate that its soft and hard X-ray components are separated spatially by approximately 0.2 arcsec by deriving the spatial offset between both components from the event centroids of the soft and hard photons utilizing the intrinsic energy-resolution of the Chandra ACIS-S detector. We also demonstrate that this offset is physical and cannot be attributed to an instrumental origin or to low counting statistics. Furthermore, the location of the derived soft X-ray emission peak coincides with emission peaks observed for optical emission lines, suggesting that both, soft X-rays and optical emission, have the same physical origin.