• We have used the 2dF instrument on the AAT to obtain redshifts of a sample of z<3, 18.0<g<21.85 quasars selected from SDSS imaging. These data are part of a larger joint programme: the 2dF-SDSS LRG and QSO Survey (2SLAQ). We describe the quasar selection algorithm and present the resulting luminosity function of 5645 quasars in 105.7 deg^2. The bright end number counts and luminosity function agree well with determinations from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) data to g\sim20.2. However, at the faint end the 2SLAQ number counts and luminosity function are steeper than the final 2QZ results from Croom et al. (2004), but are consistent with the preliminary 2QZ results from Boyle et al. (2000). Using the functional form adopted for the 2QZ analysis, we find a faint end slope of beta=-1.78+/-0.03 if we allow all of the parameters to vary and beta=-1.45+/-0.03 if we allow only the faint end slope and normalization to vary. Our maximum likelihood fit to the data yields 32% more quasars than the final 2QZ parameterization, but is not inconsistent with other g>21 deep surveys. The 2SLAQ data exhibit no well defined ``break'' but do clearly flatten with increasing magnitude. The shape of the quasar luminosity function derived from 2SLAQ is in good agreement with that derived from type I quasars found in hard X-ray surveys. [Abridged]
  • We have cross-correlated the WMAP data with several surveys of extragalactic sources and find evidence for temperature decrements associated with galaxy clusters and groups detected in the APM Galaxy Survey survey and the ACO catalogue. We interpret this as evidence for the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect from the clusters. Most interestingly, the signal may extend to ~1 deg around both groups and clusters and we suggest that this may be due to hot `supercluster' gas. We have further cross-correlated the WMAP data with clusters identified in the 2MASS galaxy catalogue and also find evidence for temperature decrements there. From the APM group data we estimate the mean Compton parameter as y(z<0.2)=7x10^(-7). We have further estimated the gas mass associated with the galaxy group and cluster haloes. Assuming temperatures of 5 keV for ACO clusters and 1 keV for APM groups and clusters, we derive average gas masses. Using the space density of APM groups we then estimate Omega_gas. For an SZ extent of theta_max=20', kT=1 keV and h=0.7, this value of Omega_gas=0.04 is consistent with the standard value of Omega_baryon=0.044 but if the indications we have found for a more extended SZ effect out to theta=60' are confirmed, then higher values of Omega_gas will be implied. Finally, the contribution to the WMAP temperature power spectrum from the extended SZ effect around the z<0.2 APM+ACO groups and clusters is 1-2 orders of magnitude lower than the l=220 first acoustic peak. But if a similar SZ effect arises from more distant clusters then this contribution could increase by a factor >10 and then could seriously affect the WMAP cosmological fits.
  • We report on measurements of the cosmological constant, Lambda, and the redshift space distortion parameter beta=Omega_m^0.6/b, based on an analysis of the QSO power spectrum parallel and perpendicular to the observer's line of sight, from the final catalogue of the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey. We derive a joint Lambda - beta constraint from the geometric and redshift-space distortions in the power spectrum. By combining this result with a second constraint based on mass clustering evolution, we break this degeneracy and obtain strong constraints on both parameters. Assuming a flat cosmology and a Lambda cosmology r(z) function to convert from redshift into comoving distance, we find best fit values of Omega_Lambda=0.71^{+0.09}_{-0.17} and beta(z~1.4)=0.45^{+0.09}_{-0.11}. Assuming instead an EdS cosmology r(z) we find that the best fit model obtained, with Omega_Lambda=0.64^{+0.11}_{-0.16} and beta(z~1.4)=0.40^{+0.09}_{-0.09}, is consistent with the Lambda r(z) results, and inconsistent with a Lambda=0 flat cosmology at over 95 per cent confidence.
  • We present a new CCD survey of galaxies within the N and S strips of the 2dFGRS areas. We use the new CCD data to check the photographic photometry scales of the 2dFGRS, APMBGC, APM-Stromlo Redshift Survey, Durham-UKST (DUKST) survey, Millenium Galaxy Catalogue (MGC) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We find evidence for scale and zero-point errors in the 2dFGRS northern field, DUKST and APM data of 0.10, 0.24 and 0.31 mag. respectively; we find excellent agreement with the MGC and SDSS photometry. We find conclusive evidence that the S counts with B<17 mag are down by ~30% relative to both the N counts and to the models of Metcalfe et al. We further compare the n(z) distributions from the B<17 mag. DUKST and B<19.5 2dFGRS redshift surveys using the corrected photometry. While the N n(z) from 2dFGRS appears relatively homogeneous over its whole range, the S n(z) shows a 30% deficiency out to z=0.1; at higher redshifts it agrees much better with the N n(z) and the homogeneous model n(z). The DUKST n(z) shows that the S `hole' extends over a 20 by 75 degree squared area. The troughs with z<0.1 in the DUKST n(z) appear deeper than for the fainter 2dFGRS data. This may be evidence that the local galaxy distribution is biased on >50 h-1 Mpc scales which is unexpected in a Lambda-CDM cosmology. Finally, since the Southern local void persists over the full area of the APM and APMBGC with a ~25% deficiency in the counts below B~17, this means that its extent is ~300 h-1 Mpc by 300 h-1 Mpc on the sky as well as ~300 h-1 Mpc in the redshift direction. Such a 25% deficiency extending over ~10^7 h-3 Mpc^3 may imply that the galaxy correlation function's power-law behaviour extends to \~150 h-1 Mpc with no break and show more excess large-scale power than detected in the 2dFGRS correlation function or expected in the Lambda-CDM cosmology.
  • We have optically identified a sample of 56 featureless continuum objects without significant proper motion from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ). The steep number--magnitude relation of the sample, $n(\bj) \propto 10^{0.7\bj}$, is similar to that derived for QSOs in the 2QZ and inconsistent with any population of Galactic objects. Follow up high resolution, high signal-to-noise, spectroscopy of five randomly selected objects confirms the featureless nature of these sources. Assuming the objects in the sample to be largely featureless AGN, and using the QSO evolution model derived for the 2QZ, we predict the median redshift of the sample to be $z=1.1$. This model also reproduces the observed number-magnitude relation of the sample using a renormalisation of the QSO luminosity function, $\Phi^* = \Phi^*_{\rm \sc qso}/66 \simeq 1.65 \times 10^{-8} $mag$^{-1}$Mpc$^{-3}$. Only $\sim$20 per cent of the objects have a radio flux density of $S_{1.4}>3 $mJy, and further VLA observations at 8.4 GHz place a $5\sigma$ limit of $S_{8.4} < 0.2$mJy on the bulk of the sample. We postulate that these objects could form a population of radio-weak AGN with weak or absent emission lines, whose optical spectra are indistinguishable from those of BL Lac objects.
  • (ABRIDGED) We present a power spectrum analysis of the 10K catalogue from the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey. We compare the redshift-space power spectra of QSOs to those measured for galaxies and Abell clusters at low redshift and find that they show similar shapes in their overlap range, 50-150h^{-1}Mpc, with P_QSO(k)\propto k^{-1.4}. The amplitude of the QSO power spectrum at z~1.4 is almost comparable to that of galaxies at the present day if Omega_m=0.3 and Omega_Lambda=0.7 (the Lambda cosmology), and a factor of ~3 lower if Omega_m=1 (the EdS cosmology) is assumed. The amplitude of the QSO power spectrum is a factor of ~10 lower than that measured for Abell clusters at the present day. At larger scales, the QSO power spectra continue to rise robustly to ~400 h^{-1}Mpc, implying more power at large scales than in the APM galaxy power spectrum measured by Baugh & Efstathiou. We split the QSO sample into two redshift bins and find little evolution in the amplitude of the power spectrum. The QSO power spectrum may show a spike feature at ~90h^{-1}Mpc assuming the Lambda cosmology or ~65 h^{-1}Mpc assuming an EdS cosmology. Although the spike appears to reproduce in both the North and South strips and in two independent redshift ranges, its statistical significance is still marginal and more data is needed to test further its reality. We compare the QSO power spectra to CDM models to obtain a constraint on the shape parameter, Gamma. For two choices of cosmology (Omega_m=1, Omega_Lambda=0 and Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7), we find the best fit model has Gamma~0.1 +-0.1.
  • When the 2dF QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) is complete, a powerful geometric test for the cosmological constant will be available. By comparing the clustering along and across the line of sight and modelling the effects of peculiar velocities and bulk motions in redshift space, geometric distortions, which occur if the wrong cosmology is assumed, can be detected. In this paper we investigate the effect of geometric and redshift-space distortions in the power spectrum parallel and perpendicular to the observer's line of sight. Ballinger et al. developed a model to estimate the cosmological constant, $\Lambda$, and the important parameter $\beta \approx \Omega_m^{0.6}/b$ from these distortions. We apply this model to a detailed simulation of the final 25k 2QZ, produced using the Virgo Consortium's huge {\it Hubble Volume} N-body $\Lambda$-CDM light cone simulation. We confirm the conclusions of Ballinger et al.; the shape of the redshift-space and geometric distortions are very similar. When all the uncertainties are taken into account we find that only a joint $\Lambda - \beta$ constraint is possible. By combining this result with a second constraint based on mass clustering evolution, however, we can make significant progress. We predict that this method should allow us to constrain $\beta$ to approximately $\pm0.1$, and $\Omega_{m}$ to $\pm0.25$ using the final catalogue. We apply the method to the 2QZ catalogue of 10000 QSOs and find that this incomplete catalogue marginally favours a $\Lambda$ cosmology.
  • We examine the highest S/N spectra from the 2QZ 10k release and identify over 100 new low-ionisation heavy element absorbers; DLA candidates suitable for higher resolution follow-up observations. These absorption systems map the spatial distribution of high-z metals in exactly the same volumes that the foreground 2QZ QSOs themselves sample and hence the 2QZ gives us the unique opportunity to directly compare the two tracers of large scale structure. We examine the cross-correlation of the two populations to see how they are relatively clustered, and, by considering the colour of the QSOs, detect a small amount of dust in these metal systems.
  • We describe a method from which cosmology may be constrained from the 2QZ Survey. By comparing clustering properties parallel and perpendicular to the line of sight and by modeling the effects of redshift space distortions, we are able to study geometric distortions in the clustering pattern which occur if a wrong cosmology is assumed when translating redshifts into comoving distances. Using mock 2QZ catalogues, drawn from the Hubble Volume simulation, we find, that there is a degeneracy between the geometric and the redshift-space distortions that makes it difficult to obtain an unambiguous estimate of Omega_{m}(0) from the geometric tests alone. However, we demonstrate a new method to determine the cosmology which works by combining the above geometric test with a test based on the evolution of the QSO clustering amplitude. We find that we are able to break the degeneracy and that independent constraints to +-20% (1 sigma) accuracy on Omega_{m}(0) and +-10% (1 sigma) accuracy on beta_{QSO}(z) should be possible in the full 2QZ survey. Finally we apply the method to the 10k catalogue of 2QZ QSOs. The smaller number of QSOs and the current status of the Survey mean that a strong result on cosmology is not possible but we do constrain beta_{QSO}(z) to 0.35+-0.2. By combining this constraint with the further constraint available from the amplitude of QSO clustering, we find tentative evidence favouring a model with non-zero Omega_{Lambda}(0), although an Omega_{m}(0)=1 model provides only a marginally less good fit. A model with Omega_{Lambda}(0)=1 is ruled out. The results are in agreement with those found by Outram et al. using a similar analysis in Fourier space. (Abridged)