• We have analyzed the new deep {\it XMM-Newton} and {\it Chandra} observations of the energetic radio-quiet pulsar J1813$-$1246. The X-ray spectrum is non-thermal, very hard and absorbed. Based on spectral considerations, we propose that J1813 is located at a distance further than 2.5 kpc. J1813 is highly pulsed in the X-ray domain, with a light curve characterized by two sharp, asymmetrical peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase. We detected no significant X-ray spectral changes during the pulsar phase. We extended the available {\it Fermi} ephemeris to five years. We found two glitches. The $\gamma$-ray lightcurve is characterized by two peaks, separated by 0.5 in phase, with a bridge in between and no off-pulse emission. The spectrum shows clear evolution in phase, being softer at the peaks and hardenning towards the bridge. The X-ray peaks lag the $\gamma$-ray ones by 0.25 in phase. We found a hint of detection in the 30-500 keV band with {\it INTEGRAL} IBIS/ISGRI, that is consistent with the extrapolation of both the soft X-ray and $\gamma$-ray emission of J1813. The peculiar X and $\gamma$-ray phasing suggests a singular emission geometry. We discuss some possibilities within the current pulsar emission models. Finally, we develop an alternative geometrical model where the X-ray emission comes from polar cap pair cascades.
  • In a radio search with the Green Bank Telescope of three unidentified low Galactic latitude Fermi-LAT sources, we have discovered the middle-aged pulsar J2030+3641, associated with 1FGL J2030.0+3641 (2FGL J2030.0+3640). Following the detection of gamma-ray pulsations using a radio ephemeris, we have obtained a phase-coherent timing solution based on gamma-ray and radio pulse arrival times that spans the entire Fermi mission. With a rotation period of 0.2 s, spin-down luminosity of 3e34 erg/s, and characteristic age of 0.5 Myr, PSR J2030+3641 is a middle-aged neutron star with spin parameters similar to those of the exceedingly gamma-ray-bright and radio-undetected Geminga. Its gamma-ray flux is 1% that of Geminga, primarily because of its much larger distance, as suggested by the large integrated column density of free electrons, DM=246 pc/cc. We fit the gamma-ray light curve, along with limited radio polarimetric constraints, to four geometrical models of magnetospheric emission, and while none of the fits have high significance some are encouraging and suggest that further refinements of these models may be worthwhile. We argue that not many more non-millisecond radio pulsars may be detected along the Galactic plane that are responsible for LAT sources, but that modified methods to search for gamma-ray pulsations should be productive -- PSR J2030+3641 would have been found blindly in gamma rays if only >0.8 GeV photons had been considered, owing to its relatively flat spectrum and location in a region of high soft background.
  • The Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite opened a new era for pulsar astronomy, detecting gamma-ray pulsations from more than 60 pulsars, ~40% of which are not seen at radio wavelengths. One of the most interesting sources discovered by LAT is PSR J0357+3205, a radio-quiet, middle-aged (tau_C ~0.5 Myr) pulsar standing out for its very low spin-down luminosity (Erot ~6x10^33 erg/s), indeed the lowest among non-recycled gamma-ray pulsars. A deep X-ray observation with Chandra (0.5-10 keV), coupled with sensitive optical/infrared ground-based images of the field, allowed us to identify PSR J0357+3205 as a faint source with a soft spectrum, consistent with a purely non-thermal emission (photon index Gamma=2.53+/-0.25). The absorbing column (NH=8+/-4x10^20 cm^-2) is consistent with a distance of a few hundred parsecs. Moreover, the Chandra data unveiled a huge (9 arcmin long) extended feature apparently protruding from the pulsar. Its non-thermal X-ray spectrum points to synchrotron emission from energetic particles from the pulsar wind, possibly similar to other elongated X-ray tails associated with rotation-powered pulsars and explained as bow-shock pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe). However, energetic arguments, as well as the peculiar morphology of the diffuse feature associated with PSR J0357+3205 make the bow-shock PWN interpretation rather challenging.
  • We report the discovery of eight gamma-ray pulsars in blind frequency searches using the LAT, onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Five of the eight pulsars are young (tau_c<100 kyr), energetic (Edot>10^36 erg/s), and located within the Galactic plane (|b|<3 deg). The remaining three are older, less energetic, and located off the plane. Five pulsars are associated with sources included in the LAT bright gamma-ray source list, but only one, PSR J1413-6205, is clearly associated with an EGRET source. PSR J1023-5746 has the smallest characteristic age (tau_c=4.6 kyr) and is the most energetic (Edot=1.1E37 erg/s) of all gamma-ray pulsars discovered so far in blind searches. PSRs J1957+5033 and J2055+25 have the largest characteristic ages (tau_c~1 Myr) and are the least energetic (Edot~5E33 erg/s) of the newly-discovered pulsars. We present the timing models, light curves, and detailed spectral parameters of the new pulsars. We used recent XMM observations to identify the counterpart of PSR J2055+25 as XMMU J205549.4+253959. In addition, publicly available archival Chandra X-ray data allowed us to identify the likely counterpart of PSR J1023-5746 as a faint, highly absorbed source, CXOU J102302.8-574606. The large X-ray absorption indicates that this could be among the most distant gamma-ray pulsars detected so far. PSR J1023-5746 is positionally coincident with the TeV source HESS J1023-575, located near the young stellar cluster Westerlund 2, while PSR J1954+2836 is coincident with a 4.3 sigma excess reported by Milagro at a median energy of 35 TeV. Deep radio follow-up observations of the eight pulsars resulted in no detections of pulsations and upper limits comparable to the faintest known radio pulsars, indicating that these can be included among the growing population of radio-quiet pulsars in our Galaxy being uncovered by the LAT, and currently numbering more than 20.
  • The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST), with its improved sensitivity relative to previous generation gamma-ray telescopes, is significantly increasing the number of known gamma-ray sources in the sky, including pulsars. In addition to searching for gamma-ray emission from known radio pulsars, it is now possible to successfully perform blind searches for pulsars on the gamma-ray data alone, with the goal of uncovering a new population of potentially radio-quiet (Geminga-like) pulsars. We describe our methods and some recent results from our searches, performed using the time-differencing technique, which have resulted in the discovery of a large number of new gamma-ray pulsars.
  • Recent rapid localizations of short, hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) by the Swift and HETE satellites have led to the observation of the first afterglows and the measurement of the first redshifts from this type of burst. Detection of >100 GeV counterparts would place powerful constraints on GRB mechanisms. Seventeen short duration (< 5 s) GRBs detected by satellites occurred within the field of view of the Milagro gamma-ray observatory between 2000 January and 2006 December. We have searched the Milagro data for >100 GeV counterparts to these GRBs and find no significant emission correlated with these bursts. Due to the absorption of high-energy gamma rays by the extragalactic background light (EBL), detections are only expected for redshifts less than ~0.5. While most long duration GRBs occur at redshifts higher than 0.5, the opposite is thought to be true of short GRBs. Lack of a detected VHE signal thus allows setting meaningful fluence limits. One GRB in the sample (050509b) has a likely association with a galaxy at a redshift of 0.225, while another (051103) has been tentatively linked to the nearby galaxy M81. Fluence limits are corrected for EBL absorption, either using the known measured redshift, or computing the corresponding absorption for a redshift of 0.1 and 0.5, as well as for the case of z=0.
  • The recently launched Swift satellite is providing an unprecedented number of rapid and accurate Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) localizations, facilitating a flurry of follow-up observations by a large number of telescopes at many different wavelengths. The Very High Energy (VHE, >100 GeV) regime has so far been relatively unexplored. Milagro is a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) ground-based gamma-ray telescope which employs a water Cherenkov detector to monitor the northern sky almost continuously in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. We have searched the Milagro data for emission from the most recent GRBs identified within our field of view. These include three Swift bursts which also display late-time X-ray flares. We have searched for emission coincident with these flares. No significant detection was made. A 99% confidence upper limit is provided for each of the GRBs, as well as the flares.
  • Milagro is a gamma-ray observatory employing a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high-energy particles impacting in the Earth's atmosphere. We discuss the first detection of TeV gamma-rays from the Galactic plane and report the detection of an extended TeV source coincident with the EGRET source 3EG J0520+2556, and the observation of TeV emission from the Cygnus region of our Galaxy. We also summarize the status of our search for Very High Energy (VHE) emission from satellite-triggered Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and discuss plans for the next generation water Cherenkov detector.
  • The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high-energy particles impacting in the Earth's atmosphere. A 4800 m$^{2}$ pond instrumented with 723 8" PMTs detects Cherenkov light produced by secondary air-shower particles. An array of 175 4000 liter water tanks surrounding the central pond detector was recently added, extending the physical area of the Milagro observatory to 40,000 m$^{2}$ and substantially increasing the sensitivity of the detector. Because of its wide field of view and high duty cycle, Milagro is ideal for monitoring the northern sky almost continuously ($>$90% duty cycle) in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. Here we discuss the first detection of TeV gamma-rays from the inner Galactic plane region. We also report the detection of an extended TeV source coincident with the EGRET source 3EG J0520+2556, as well as the observation of extended TeV emission from the Cygnus region of the Galactic plane.
  • We present an analysis of long term X-ray monitoring observations of Circinus X-1 (Cir X-1) made with four different instruments: Vela 5B, Ariel V ASM, Ginga ASM, and RXTE ASM, over the course of more than 30 years. We use Lomb-Scargle periodograms to search for the ~16.5 day orbital period of Cir X-1 in each of these data sets and from this derive a new orbital ephemeris based solely on X-ray measurements, which we compare to the previous ephemerides obtained from radio observations. We also use the Phase Dispersion Minimization (PDM) technique, as well as FFT analysis, to verify the periods obtained from periodograms. we obtain dynamic periodograms (both Lomb-Scargle and PDM) of Cir X-1 during the RXTE era, showing the period evolution of Cir X-1, and also displaying some unexplained discrete jumps in the location of the peak power.