• We present a first instalment of the MUSE-Wide survey, covering an area of 22.2 arcmin$^2$ (corresponding to $\sim$20% of the final survey) in the CANDELS/Deep area of the Chandra Deep Field South. We use the MUSE integral field spectrograph at the ESO VLT to conduct a full-area spectroscopic mapping at a depth of 1h exposure time per 1 arcmin$^2$ pointing. We searched for compact emission line objects using our newly developed LSDCat software based on a 3-D matched filtering approach, followed by interactive classification and redshift measurement of the sources. Our catalogue contains 831 distinct emission line galaxies with redshifts ranging from 0.04 to 6. Roughly one third (237) of the emission line sources are Lyman $\alpha$ emitting galaxies with $3 < z < 6$, only four of which had previously measured spectroscopic redshifts. At lower redshifts 351 galaxies are detected primarily by their [OII] emission line ($0.3 \lesssim z \lesssim 1.5$), 189 by their [OIII] line ($0.21 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.85$), and 46 by their H$\alpha$ line ($0.04 \lesssim z \lesssim 0.42$). Comparing our spectroscopic redshifts to photometric redshift estimates from the literature, we find excellent agreement for $z<1.5$ with a median $\Delta z$ of only $\sim 4 \times 10^{-4}$ and an outlier rate of 6%, however a significant systematic offset of $\Delta z = 0.26$ and an outlier rate of 23% for Ly$\alpha$ emitters at $z>3$. Together with the catalogue we also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and small 3D datacubes centred on each of the 831 sources.
  • We present a clustering analysis of a sample of 238 Ly{$\alpha$}-emitters at redshift 3<z<6 from the MUSE-Wide survey. This survey mosaics extragalactic legacy fields with 1h MUSE pointings to detect statistically relevant samples of emission line galaxies. We analysed the first year observations from MUSE-Wide making use of the clustering signal in the line-of-sight direction. This method relies on comparing pair-counts at close redshifts for a fixed transverse distance and thus exploits the full potential of the redshift range covered by our sample. A clear clustering signal with a correlation length of r0 = 2.9(+1.0/-1.1) Mpc (comoving) is detected. Whilst this result is based on only about a quarter of the full survey size, it already shows the immense potential of MUSE for efficiently observing and studying the clustering of Ly{$\alpha$}-emitters.
  • We present IFU observations with MUSE@VLT and deep imaging with FORS@VLT of a dwarf galaxy recently formed within the giant collisional HI ring surrounding NGC 5291. This TDG-like object has the characteristics of typical z=1-2 gas-rich spiral galaxies: a high gas fraction, a rather turbulent clumpy ISM, the absence of an old stellar population, a moderate metallicity and star formation efficiency. The MUSE spectra allow us to determine the physical conditions within the various complex substructures revealed by the deep optical images, and to scrutinize at unprecedented spatial resolution the ionization processes at play in this specific medium. Starburst age, extinction and metallicity maps of the TDG and surrounding regions were determined using the strong emission lines Hbeta, [OIII], [OI], [NII], Halpha and [SII] combined with empirical diagnostics. Discrimination between different ionization mechanisms was made using BPT--like diagrams and shock plus photoionization models. Globally, the physical conditions within the star--forming regions are homogeneous, with in particular an uniform half-solar oxygen abundance. At small scales, the derived extinction map shows narrow dust lanes. Regions with atypically strong [OI] emission line immediately surround the TDG. The [OI] / Halpha ratio cannot be easily accounted for by photoionization by young stars or shock models. At larger distances from the main star--forming clumps, a faint diffuse blue continuum emission is observed, both with the deep FORS images and MUSE data. It does not have a clear counterpart in the UV regime probed by GALEX. A stacked spectrum towards this region does not exhibit any emission line, excluding faint levels of star formation, nor stellar absorption lines that might have revealed the presence of old stars. Several hypotheses are discussed for the origin of these intriguing features.
  • We present a clustering analysis of Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) using nearly 9 000 objects from the final catalogue of the 2dF-SDSS LRG And QSO (2SLAQ) Survey. We measure the redshift-space two-point correlation function, xi(s), at the mean LRG redshift of z=0.55. A single power-law fits the deprojected correlation function, xi(r), with a correlation length of r_0=7.45+-0.35 Mpc and a power-law slope of gamma=1.72+-0.06 in the 0.4<r<50 Mpc range. But it is in the LRG angular correlation function that the strongest evidence for non-power-law features is found where a slope of gamma=-2.17+-0.07 is seen at 1<r<10 Mpc with a flatter gamma=-1.67+-0.03 slope apparent at r<~1 Mpc scales. We use the simple power-law fit to the galaxy xi(r) to model the redshift space distortions in the 2-D redshift-space correlation function, xi(sigma,pi). We fit for the LRG velocity dispersion, w_z, Omega_m and beta, where beta=Omega_m^0.6/b and b is the linear bias parameter. We find values of w_z=330kms^-1, Omega_m= 0.10+0.35-0.10 and beta=0.40+-0.05. These high redshift results, which incorporate the Alcock-Paczynski effect and the effects of dynamical infall, start to break the degeneracy between Omega_m and beta found in low-redshift galaxy surveys. This degeneracy is further broken by introducing an additional external constraint, the value of beta(z=0.1)=0.45 from 2dFGRS, and then considering the evolution of clustering from z~0 to z_LRG~0.55. With these combined methods we find Omega_m(z=0)=0.30+-0.15 and beta(z=0.55)=0.45+-0.05. Assuming these values, we find a value for b(z=0.55)=1.66+-0.35. We show that this is consistent with a simple ``high peaks'' bias prescription which assumes that LRGs have a constant co-moving density and their clustering evolves purely under gravity. [ABRIDGED]
  • We present H-band infra-red galaxy data to a 3 sigma limit of H=22.9 and optical-infra-red colours of galaxies on the William Herschel Deep Field. These data were taken from a 7'x 7' area observed for 14 hours with the Omega Prime camera on the 3.5-m Calar Alto telescope. We derive H-band number counts, colour-magnitude diagrams and colour histograms. We review our Pure Luminosity Evolution galaxy count models based on the spectral synthesis models of Bruzual & Charlot. These PLE models give an excellent fit to the our H band count data to H<22.5 and HDF count data to H<28. However, PLE models with a Salpeter IMF for early-type galaxies overestimate the average galaxy redshift in K<20 galaxy redshift surveys. Models that assume a steep x=3 IMF give better agreement data, although they do show an unobserved peak in B-H and I-H colour distributions at faint H magnitudes corresponding to z>1 early-type galaxies. This feature may simply reflect a larger scatter in optical-infra-red colours than in the B-R colour of early-type galaxies at this redshift. This scatter is obvious in optical-IR colour-colour diagrams and may be explained by on-going star-formation in an intermediate sub-population of early-type galaxies. The numbers of EROs detected are a factor of 2-3 lower than predicted by the early-type models that assume the Salpeter IMF and in better agreement with those that assume the x=3 IMF. The tight sequence of early-type galaxies also shows a sub-class which is simultaneously redder in infrared bands and bluer in the bluer bands than the classical, passive early-type galaxy; this sub-class appears at relatively low redshifts and may constitute an intermediate age, early-type population.