• Stochastic simulations of cyclic three-species spatial predator-prey models are usually performed in square lattices with nearest neighbor interactions starting from random initial conditions. In this Letter we describe the results of off-lattice Lotka-Volterra stochastic simulations, showing that the emergence of spiral patterns does occur for sufficiently high values of the (conserved) total density of individuals. We also investigate the dynamics in our simulations, finding an empirical relation characterizing the dependence of the characteristic peak frequency and amplitude on the total density. Finally, we study the impact of the total density on the extinction probability, showing how a low population density may jeopardize biodiversity.
  • Deciphering the assembly history of the Milky Way is a formidable task, which becomes possible only if one can produce high-resolution chrono-chemo-kinematical maps of the Galaxy. Data from large-scale astrometric and spectroscopic surveys will soon provide us with a well-defined view of the current chemo-kinematical structure of the Milky Way, but will only enable a blurred view on the temporal sequence that led to the present-day Galaxy. As demonstrated by the (ongoing) exploitation of data from the pioneering photometric missions CoRoT, Kepler, and K2, asteroseismology provides the way forward: solar-like oscillating giants are excellent evolutionary clocks thanks to the availability of seismic constraints on their mass and to the tight age-initial-mass relation they adhere to. In this paper we identify five key outstanding questions relating to the formation and evolution of the Milky Way that will need precise and accurate ages for large samples of stars to be addressed, and we identify the requirements in terms of number of targets and the precision on the stellar properties that are needed to tackle such questions. By quantifying the asteroseismic yields expected from PLATO for red-giant stars, we demonstrate that these requirements are within the capabilities of the current instrument design, provided that observations are sufficiently long to identify the evolutionary state and allow robust and precise determination of acoustic-mode frequencies. This will allow us to harvest data of sufficient quality to reach a 10% precision in age. This is a fundamental pre-requisite to then reach the more ambitious goal of a similar level of accuracy, which will only be possible if we have to hand a careful appraisal of systematic uncertainties on age deriving from our limited understanding of stellar physics, a goal which conveniently falls within the main aims of PLATO's core science.
  • In the letter by Stadnik and Flambaum [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 151301 (2014)] it is claimed that topological defects passing through pulsars could be responsible for the observed pulsar glitches. Here, we show that, independently of the detailed network dynamics and defect dimensionality, such proposal is faced with serious difficulties.
  • With recent advances in asteroseismology it is now possible to peer into the cores of red giants, potentially providing a way to study processes such as nuclear burning and mixing through their imprint as sharp structural variations -- glitches -- in the stellar cores. Here we show how such core glitches can affect the oscillations we observe in red giants. We derive an analytical expression describing the expected frequency pattern in the presence of a glitch. This formulation also accounts for the coupling between acoustic and gravity waves. From an extensive set of canonical stellar models we find glitch-induced variation in the period spacing and inertia of non-radial modes during several phases of red-giant evolution. Significant changes are seen in the appearance of mode amplitude and frequency patterns in asteroseismic diagrams such as the power spectrum and the \'echelle diagram. Interestingly, along the red-giant branch glitch-induced variation occurs only at the luminosity bump, potentially providing a direct seismic indicator of stars in that particular evolution stage. Similarly, we find the variation at only certain post-helium-ignition evolution stages, namely, in the early phases of helium-core burning and at the beginning of helium-shell burning signifying the asymptotic-giant-branch bump. Based on our results, we note that assuming stars to be glitch-free, while they are not, can result in an incorrect estimate of the period spacing. We further note that including diffusion and mixing beyond classical Schwarzschild, could affect the characteristics of the glitches, potentially providing a way to study these physical processes.
  • In this work we investigate the development of stable dynamical structures along interfaces separating domains belonging to enemy partnerships, in the context of cyclic predator-prey models with an even number of species $N \ge 8$. We use both stochastic and field theory simulations in one and two spatial dimensions, as well as analytical arguments, to describe the association at the interfaces of mutually neutral individuals belonging to enemy partnerships and to probe their role in the development of the dynamical structures at the interfaces. We identify an interesting behaviour associated to the symmetric or asymmetric evolution of the interface profiles depending on whether $N/2$ is odd or even, respectively. We also show that the macroscopic evolution of the interface network is not very sensitive internal structure of the interfaces. Although this work focus on cyclic predator prey-models with an even number of species, we argue that the results are expected to be quite generic in the context of spatial stochastic May-Leonard models.
  • We explicitly demonstrate the existence of static global defect solutions of arbitrary dimensionality whose energy does not diverge at spatial infinity, by considering maximally symmetric solutions described by an action with non-standard kinetic terms in a D+1 dimensional Minkowski space-time. We analytically determine the defect profile both at small and large distances from the defect centre. We verify the stability of such solutions and discuss possible implications of our findings, in particular for dark matter and charge fractionalization in graphene.
  • We study the geometry inside the event horizon of perturbed D dimensional Reissner-Nordstrom-(A)dS type black holes showing that, similarly to the four dimensional case, mass inflation also occurs for D>4. First, using the homogeneous approximation, we show that an increase of the number of spatial dimensions contributes to a steeper variation of the metric coefficients with the areal radius and that the phenomenon is insensitive to the cosmological constant in leading order. Then, using the code reported in arXiv:0904.2669 [gr-qc] adapted to D dimensions, we perform fully non-linear numerical simulations. We perturb the black hole with a compact pulse adapting the pulse amplitude such that the relative variation of the black hole mass is the same in all dimensions, and determine how the black hole interior evolves under the perturbation. We qualitatively confirm that the phenomenon is similar to four dimensions as well as the behaviour observed in the homogeneous approximation. We speculate about the formation of black holes inside black holes triggered by mass inflation, and about possible consequences of this scenario.
  • In this work we determine the correspondence between quintessence and tachyon dark energy models with a constant dark energy equation of state parameter, $w_e$. Although the evolution of both the Hubble parameter and the scalar field potential with redshift is the same, we show that the evolution of quintessence/tachyon scalar fields with redshift is, in general, very different. We explicity demonstrate that if $w_e \neq -1$ the potentials need to be very fine-tuned for the relative perturbation on the equation of state parameter, $\Delta w_e/(1+w_e) \ll 1$, to be very small around the present time. We also discuss possible implications of our results for the reconstruction of the evolution of $w_e$ with redshift using varying couplings.
  • In this paper we investigate possible solutions to the coincidence problem in flat phantom dark energy models with a constant dark energy equation of state and quintessence models with a linear scalar field potential. These models are representative of a broader class of cosmological scenarios in which the universe has a finite lifetime. We show that, in the absence of anthropic constraints, including a prior probability for the models inversely proportional to the total lifetime of the universe excludes models very close to the $\Lambda {\rm CDM}$ model. This relates a cosmological solution to the coincidence problem with a dynamical dark energy component having an equation of state parameter not too close to -1 at the present time. We further show, that anthropic constraints, if they are sufficiently stringent, may solve the coincidence problem without the need for dynamical dark energy.
  • We develop a velocity-dependent one-scale model describing p-brane dynamics in flat homogeneous and isotropic backgrounds in a unified framework. We find the corresponding scaling laws in frictionless and friction dominated regimes considering both expanding and collapsing phases.
  • We develop a velocity-dependent one-scale model for the evolution of domain wall networks in flat expanding or collapsing homogeneous and isotropic universes with an arbitrary number of spatial dimensions, finding the corresponding scaling laws in frictionless and friction dominated regimes. We also determine the allowed range of values of the curvature parameter and the expansion exponent for which a linear scaling solution is possible in the frictionless regime.
  • The Press-Ryden-Spergel (PRS) algorithm is a modification to the field theory equations of motion, parametrized by two parameters ($\alpha$ and $\beta$), implemented in numerical simulations of cosmological domain wall networks, in order to ensure a fixed comoving resolution. In this paper we explicitly demonstrate that the PRS algorithm provides the correct domain wall dynamics in $N+1$-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universes if $\alpha+\beta/2=N$, fully validating its use in numerical studies of cosmic domain evolution. We further show that this result is valid for generic thin featureless domain walls, independently of the Lagrangian of the model.
  • In this paper we develop a common theoretical framework for the dynamics of thin featureless interfaces. We explicitly demonstrate that the same phase field and velocity dependent one-scale models characterizing the dynamics of relativistic domain walls, in a cosmological context, can also successfully describe, in a friction dominated regime, the dynamics of nonrelativistic interfaces in a wide variety of material systems. We further show that a statistical version of von Neumann's law applies in the case of scaling relativistic interface networks, implying that, although relativistic and nonrelativistic interfaces have very different dynamics, a single simulation snapshot is not able to clearly distinguish the two regimes. We highlight that crucial information is contained in the probability distribution function for the number of edges of domains bounded by the interface network and explain why laboratory tests with nonrelativistic interfaces can be used to rule out cosmological domain walls as a significant dark energy source.
  • We study the effect of the rotation of an external electric field on the dynamics of half-integer disclination networks in two dimensional nematic liquid crystals with a negative dielectric anisotropy using LICRA, a LIquid CRystal Algorithm developed by the authors. We show that a rotation of $\pi$ of the electric field around an axis of the liquid crystal plane continuously transforms all half-integer disclinations of the network into disclinations of opposite sign via twist disclinations. We also determine the evolution of the characteristic length scale, thus quantifying the impact of the external electric field on the coarsening of the defect network.
  • In this work we investigate the duality linking standard and tachyon scalar field cosmologies. We determine the transformation between standard and tachyon scalar fields and between their associated potentials, corresponding to the same background evolution. We show that, in general, the duality is broken at a perturbative level, when deviations from a homogeneous and isotropic background are taken into account. However, we find that for slow-rolling fields the duality is still preserved at a linear level. We illustrate our results with specific examples of cosmological relevance, where the correspondence between scalar and tachyon scalar field models can be calculated explicitly.
  • In this paper we investigate the dynamics of liquid crystal textures in a two-dimensional nematic under applied electric fields, using numerical simulations performed using a publicly available LIquid CRystal Algorithm (LICRA) developed by the authors. We consider both positive and negative dielectric anisotropies and two different possibilities for the orientation of the electric field (parallel and perpendicular to the two-dimensional lattice). We determine the effect of an applied electric field pulse on the evolution of the characteristic length scale and other properties of the liquid crystal texture network. In particular, we show that different types of defects are produced after the electric field is switched on, depending on the orientation of the electric field and the sign of the dielectric anisotropy.
  • The role of domain wall junctions in Carter's pentahedral model is investigated both analytically and numerically. We perform, for the first time, field theory simulations of such model with various initial conditions. We confirm that there are very specific realizations of Carter's model corresponding to square lattice configurations with X-type junctions which could be stable. However, we show that more realistic realizations, consistent with causality constraints, do lead to a scaling domain wall network with Y-type junctions. We determine the network properties and discuss the corresponding cosmological implications, in particular for dark energy.
  • In this paper we study the impact of the fractional matter density uncertainty in the reconstruction of the equation of state of dark energy. We consider both standard reconstruction methods, based on the dynamical effect that dark energy has on the expansion of the Universe, as well as non-standard methods, in which the evolution of the dark energy equation of state with redshift is inferred through the variation of fundamental couplings such as the fine structure constant, $\alpha$, or the proton-to-electron mass ratio, $\mu$. We show that the negative impact of the matter density uncertainty in the dark energy reconstruction using varying couplings may be very small compared to standard reconstruction methods. We also briefly discuss other fundamental questions which need to be answered before varying couplings can be successfully used to probe the nature of the dark energy.
  • This work deals with bifurcation and pattern changing in models described by two real scalar fields. We consider generic models with quartic potentials and show that the number of independent polynomial coefficients affecting the ratios between the various domain wall tensions can be reduced to 4 if the model has a superpotential. We then study specific one-parameter families of models and compute the wall tensions associated with both BPS and non-BPS sectors. We show how bifurcation can be associated to modification of the patterns of domain wall networks and illustrate this with some examples which may be relevant to describe realistic situations of current interest in high energy physics. In particular, we discuss a simple solution to the cosmological domain wall problem.
  • A detailed non-linear analysis of the internal structure of spherical, charged black holes that are accreting scalar matter is performed in the framework of the Brans-Dicke theory of gravity. We choose the lowest value of the Brans-Dicke parameter that is compatible with observational constraints. First, the homogeneous approximation is used. It indicates that mass inflation occurs and that the variations of the Brans-Dicke scalar inside the black hole, which could in principle be large in the absence of mass inflation, become small when mass inflation does occur. Then, a full non-linear numerical study of the black hole interior perturbed by a self-gravitating massless uncharged scalar-field is performed. We use an algorithm with adaptive mesh refinement capabilities. In this way, the changes in the internal structure of the black hole caused by mass inflation are determined, as well as the induced variations of the Brans-Dicke scalar, confirming, qualitatively, the indications given by the homogeneous approximation.
  • We study the evolution of maximally symmetric $p$-branes with a $S_{p-i}\otimes \mathbbm{R}^i$ topology in flat expanding or collapsing homogeneous and isotropic universes with $N+1$ dimensions (with $N \ge 3$, $p < N$, $0 \le i < p$). We find the corresponding equations of motion and compute new analytical solutions for the trajectories in phase space. For a constant Hubble parameter, $H$, and $i=0$ we show that all initially static solutions with a physical radius below a certain critical value, $r_c^0$, are periodic while those with a larger initial radius become frozen in comoving coordinates at late times. We find a stationary solution with constant velocity and physical radius, $r_c$, and compute the root mean square velocity of the periodic $p$-brane solutions and the corresponding (average) equation of state of the $p$-brane gas. We also investigate the $p$-brane dynamics for $H \neq {\rm constant}$ in models where the evolution of the universe is driven by a perfect fluid with constant equation of state parameter, $w={\cal P}_p/\rho_p$, and show that a critical radius, $r_c$, can still be defined for $ -1 \le w < w_c$ with $w_c=(2-N)/N$. We further show that for $w \sim w_c$ the critical radius is given approximately by $r_c H \propto (w_c-w)^{\gamma_c}$ with $\gamma_c=-1/2$ ($r_c H \to \infty$ when $w \to w_c$). Finally, we discuss the impact that the large scale dynamics of the universe can have on the macroscopic evolution of very small loops.
  • We discuss the possible dynamical role of extended cosmic defects on galactic scales, specifically focusing on the possibility that they may provide the dark matter suggested by the classical problem of galactic rotation curves. We emphasize that the more standard defects (such as Goto-Nambu strings) are unsuitable for this task, but show that more general models (such as transonic wiggly strings) could in principle have a better chance. In any case, we show that observational data severely restricts any such scenarios.
  • We use a combination of analytic tools and an extensive set of the largest and most accurate three-dimensional field theory numerical simulations to study the dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions. We build upon our previous work and consider a class of models which, in the limit of large number $N$ of coupled scalar fields, approaches the so-called `ideal' model (in terms of its potential to lead to network frustration). We consider values of $N$ between N=2 and N=20, and a range of cosmological epochs, and we also compare this class of models with other toy models used in the past. In all cases we find compelling evidence for a gradual approach to scaling, strongly supporting our no-frustration conjecture. We also discuss the various possible types of junctions (including cases where there is a hierarchy of them) and their roles in the dynamics of the network. Finally, we revise the Zel'dovich bound and provide an updated cosmological bound on the energy scale of this type of defect network: it must be lower than $10 {\rm keV}$.
  • In this paper we show that a \emph{one-to-one} correspondence exists between any dark energy model and an equivalent (from a cosmological point of view, in the absence of perturbations) quartessence model in which dark matter and dark energy are described by a single perfect fluid. We further show that if the density fluctuations are small, the evolution of the sound speed squared, $c_s^2$, is fully coupled to the evolution of the scale factor and that the transition from the dark matter to the dark energy dominated epoch is faster (slower) than in a standard $\Lambda$CDM model if $c_s^2 > 0$ ($c_s^2 < 0$). In particular, we show that the mapping of the simplest quintessence scenario with constant $w_Q \equiv p_Q/ \rho_Q$ into a unified dark energy model requires $c_s^2 < 0$ at the present time (if $w_Q > -1$) contrasting to the Chaplygin gas scenario where one has $c_s^2 > 0$. However, we show that non-linear effects severely complicate the analysis, in particular rendering linear results invalid even on large cosmological scales. Although a detailed analysis of non-linear effects requires solving the full Einstein field equations, some general properties can be understood in simple terms. In particular, we find that in the context of Chaplygin gas models the transition from the dark matter to the dark energy dominated era may be anticipated with respect to linear expectations leading to a background evolution similar to that of standard $\Lambda$CDM models. On the other hand, in models with $c_s^2 > 0$ the expected transition from the decelerating to the accelerating phase may never happen.
  • We study the evolution of simple cosmic string loop solutions in an inflationary universe. We show, for the particular case of circular loops, that periodic solutions do exist in a de Sitter universe, below a critical loop radius $R_c H=1/2$. On the other hand, larger loops freeze in comoving coordinates, and we explicitly show that they can survive more $e$-foldings of inflation than point-like objects. We discuss the implications of these findings for the survival of realistic cosmic string loops during inflation, and for the general characteristics of post-inflationary cosmic string networks. We also consider the analogous solutions for domain walls, in which case the critical radius is $R_c H=2/3$.