• The fraction of cluster galaxies that host luminous AGN is an important probe of AGN fueling processes, the cold ISM at the centers of galaxies, and how tightly black holes and galaxies co-evolve. We present a new measurement of the AGN fraction in a sample of 13 clusters of galaxies (M >= 10^{14} Msun) at 1<z<1.5 selected from the Spitzer/IRAC Shallow Cluster Survey, as well as the field fraction in the immediate vicinity of these clusters, and combine these data with measurements from the literature to quantify the relative evolution of cluster and field AGN from the present to z~3. We estimate that the cluster AGN fraction at 1<z<1.5 is f_A = 3.0^{+2.4}_{-1.4}% for AGN with a rest-frame, hard X-ray luminosity greater than L_{X,H} >= 10^{44} erg/s. This fraction is measured relative to all cluster galaxies more luminous than M*_{3.6}(z)+1, where M*_{3.6}(z) is the absolute magnitude of the break in the galaxy luminosity function at the cluster redshift in the IRAC 3.6um bandpass. The cluster AGN fraction is 30 times greater than the 3sigma upper limit on the value for AGN of similar luminosity at z~0.25, as well as more than an order of magnitude greater than the AGN fraction at z~0.75. AGN with L_{X,H} >= 10^{43} erg/s exhibit similarly pronounced evolution with redshift. In contrast with the local universe, where the luminous AGN fraction is higher in the field than in clusters, the X-ray and MIR-selected AGN fractions in the field and clusters are consistent at 1<z<1.5. This is evidence that the cluster AGN population has evolved more rapidly than the field population from z~1.5 to the present. This environment-dependent AGN evolution mimics the more rapid evolution of star-forming galaxies in clusters relative to the field.
  • Venemans et al. (2005) found evidence for an overdensity of Ly-alpha emission line galaxies associated with the radio galaxy MRC 0316-257 at z=3.13 indicating the presence of a massive protocluster. Here, we present the results of a search for additional star-forming galaxies and AGN within the protocluster. Narrow-band infrared imaging was used to select candidate [O III] emitters in a 1.1 x 1.1 Mpc^2 region around the radio galaxy. Thirteen candidates have been detected. Four of these are among the previously confirmed sample of Ly-alpha galaxies, and an additional three have been confirmed through follow-up infrared spectroscopy. The three newly confirmed objects lie within a few hundred km/s of each other, but are blueshifted with respect to the radio galaxy and Ly-alpha emitters by ~2100 km/s. Although the sample is currently small, our results indicate that the radio-selected protocluster is forming at the centre of a larger, ~60 co-moving Mpc super-structure. On the basis of an HST/ACS imaging study we calculate dust-corrected star-formation rates and investigate morphologies and sizes of the [O III] candidate emitters. From a comparison of the star formation rate derived from UV-continuum and [O III] emission, we conclude that at least two of the [O III] galaxies harbour an AGN which ionized the O+ gas.
  • We combine the results of the Spitzer IRAC Shallow Survey and the Chandra XBootes Survey of the 8.5 square degrees Bootes field of the NOAO Deep Wide- Field Survey to produce the largest comparison of mid-IR and X-ray sources to date. The comparison is limited to sources with X-ray fluxes >8x10-15 erg cm-2s-1 in the 0.5-7.0 keV range and mid-IR sources with 3.6 um fluxes brighter than 18.4 mag (12.3 uJy). In this most sensitive IRAC band, 85% of the 3086 X-ray sources have mid-IR counterparts at an 80% confidence level based on a Bayesian matching technique. Only 2.5% of the sample have no IRAC counterpart at all based on visual inspection. Even for a smaller but a significantly deeper Chandra survey in the same field, the IRAC Shallow Survey recovers most of the X-ray sources. A majority (65%) of the Chandra sources detected in all four IRAC bands occupy a well-defined region of IRAC [3.6] - [4.5] vs [5.8] - [8.0] color-color space. These X-ray sources are likely infrared luminous, unobscured type I AGN with little mid-infrared flux contributed by the AGN host galaxy. Of the remaining Chandra sources, most are lower luminosity type I and type II AGN whose mid-IR emission is dominated by the host galaxy, while approximately 5% are either Galactic stars or very local galaxies.
  • The Chandra X-ray Observatory was used to obtain a 190 ks image of three high redshift galaxy clusters in one observation. The results of our analysis of these data are reported for the two z > 1 clusters in this Lynx field, including the most distant known X-ray selected cluster. Spatially-extended X-ray emission was detected from both these clusters, indicating the presence of hot gas in their intracluster media. A fit to the X-ray spectrum of RX J0849+4452, at z=1.26, yields a temperature of kT = 5.8^{+2.8}_{-1.7} keV. Using this temperature and the assumption of an isothermal sphere, the total mass of RX J0849+4452 is found to be 4.0^{+2.4}_{-1.9} X 10^{14} h_{65}^{-1} M_{\sun} within r = 1 h_{65}^{-1} Mpc. The T_x for RX J0849+4452 approximately agrees with the expectation based on its L_{bol} = 3.3^{+0.9}_{-0.5} X 10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1} according to the low redshift L_x - T_x relation. The very different distributions of X-ray emitting gas and of the red member galaxies in the two z > 1 clusters, in contrast to the similarity of the optical/IR colors of those galaxies, suggests that the early-type galaxies mostly formed before their host clusters.