• We propose a new method for simplifying semidefinite programs (SDP) inspired by symmetry reduction. Specifically, we show if an orthogonal projection map satisfies certain invariance conditions, restricting to its range yields an equivalent primal-dual pair over a lower-dimensional symmetric cone---namely, the cone-of-squares of a Jordan subalgebra of symmetric matrices. We present a simple algorithm for minimizing the rank of this projection and hence the dimension of this subalgebra. We also show that minimizing rank optimizes the direct-sum decomposition of the algebra into simple ideals, yielding an optimal "block-diagonalization" of the SDP. Finally, we give combinatorial versions of our algorithm that execute at reduced computational cost and illustrate effectiveness of an implementation on examples. Through the theory of Jordan algebras, the proposed method easily extends to linear and second-order-cone programming and, more generally, symmetric cone optimization.
  • In this paper we consider a parametric family of quadratically constrained quadratic programs (QCQP) and their associated semidefinite programming (SDP) relaxations. Given a value of the parameters at which the SDP relaxation is exact, we study conditions (and quantitative bounds) under which the relaxation will continue to be exact as the parameter moves in a neighborhood around it. More generally, our results can be used to analyze SDP relaxations of polynomial optimization problems. Our framework captures several estimation problems such as low rank approximation, camera triangulation, rotation synchronization and approximate matrix completion. The SDP relaxation correctly solves these problems under noiseless observations, and our results guarantee that the relaxation will continue to solve them in the low noise regime.
  • The matrix logarithm, when applied to Hermitian positive definite matrices, is concave with respect to the positive semidefinite order. This operator concavity property leads to numerous concavity and convexity results for other matrix functions, many of which are of importance in quantum information theory. In this paper we show how to approximate the matrix logarithm with functions that preserve operator concavity and can be described using the feasible regions of semidefinite optimization problems of fairly small size. Such approximations allow us to use off-the-shelf semidefinite optimization solvers for convex optimization problems involving the matrix logarithm and related functions, such as the quantum relative entropy. The basic ingredients of our approach apply, beyond the matrix logarithm, to functions that are operator concave and operator monotone. As such, we introduce strategies for constructing semidefinite approximations that we expect will be useful, more generally, for studying the approximation power of functions with small semidefinite representations.
  • We show that existence of a global polynomial Lyapunov function for a homogeneous polynomial vector field or a planar polynomial vector field (under a mild condition) implies existence of a polynomial Lyapunov function that is a sum of squares (sos) and that the negative of its derivative is also a sum of squares. This result is extended to show that such sos-based certificates of stability are guaranteed to exist for all stable switched linear systems. For this class of systems, we further show that if the derivative inequality of the Lyapunov function has an sos certificate, then the Lyapunov function itself is automatically a sum of squares. These converse results establish cases where semidefinite programming is guaranteed to succeed in finding proofs of Lyapunov inequalities. Finally, we demonstrate some merits of replacing the sos requirement on a polynomial Lyapunov function with an sos requirement on its top homogeneous component. In particular, we show that this is a weaker algebraic requirement in addition to being cheaper to impose computationally.
  • We study sum of squares (SOS) relaxations to optimize polynomial functions over a set $V\cap R^n$, where $V$ is a complex algebraic variety. We propose a new methodology that, rather than relying on some algebraic description, represents $V$ with a generic set of complex samples. This approach depends only on the geometry of $V$, avoiding representation issues such as multiplicity and choice of generators. It also takes advantage of the coordinate ring structure to reduce the size of the corresponding semidefinite program (SDP). In addition, the input can be given as a straight-line program. Our methods are particularly appealing for varieties that are easy to sample from but for which the defining equations are complicated, such as $SO(n)$, Grassmannians or rank $k$ tensors. For arbitrary varieties we can obtain the required samples by using the tools of numerical algebraic geometry. In this way we connect the areas of SOS optimization and numerical algebraic geometry.
  • This is an experimental case study in real algebraic geometry, aimed at computing the image of a semialgebraic subset of 3-space under a polynomial map into the plane. For general instances, the boundary of the image is given by two highly singular curves. We determine these curves and show how they demarcate the "flattened soccer ball". We explore cylindrical algebraic decompositions, by working through concrete examples. Maps onto convex polygons and connections to convex optimization are also discussed.
  • We introduce a novel representation of structured polynomial ideals, which we refer to as chordal networks. The sparsity structure of a polynomial system is often described by a graph that captures the interactions among the variables. Chordal networks provide a computationally convenient decomposition into simpler (triangular) polynomial sets, while preserving the underlying graphical structure. We show that many interesting families of polynomial ideals admit compact chordal network representations (of size linear in the number of variables), even though the number of components is exponentially large. Chordal networks can be computed for arbitrary polynomial systems using a refinement of the chordal elimination algorithm from [Cifuentes-Parrilo-2016]. Furthermore, they can be effectively used to obtain several properties of the variety, such as its dimension, cardinality, and equidimensional components, as well as an efficient probabilistic test for radical ideal membership. We apply our methods to examples from algebraic statistics and vector addition systems; for these instances, algorithms based on chordal networks outperform existing techniques by orders of magnitude.
  • Sequential rate-distortion (SRD) theory provides a framework for studying the fundamental trade-off between data-rate and data-quality in real-time communication systems. In this paper, we consider the SRD problem for multi-dimensional time-varying Gauss-Markov processes under mean-square distortion criteria. We first revisit the sensor-estimator separation principle, which asserts that considered SRD problem is equivalent to a joint sensor and estimator design problem in which data-rate of the sensor output is minimized while the estimator's performance satisfies the distortion criteria. We then show that the optimal joint design can be performed by semidefinite programming. A semidefinite representation of the corresponding SRD function is obtained. Implications of the obtained result in the context of zero-delay source coding theory and applications to networked control theory are also discussed.
  • We present an efficient algorithm to compute permanents, mixed discriminants and hyperdeterminants of structured matrices and multidimensional arrays (tensors). We describe the sparsity structure of an array in terms of a graph, and we assume that its treewidth, denoted as $\omega$, is small. Our algorithm requires $O(n 2^\omega)$ arithmetic operations to compute permanents, and $O(n^2 + n 3^\omega)$ for mixed discriminants and hyperdeterminants. We finally show that mixed volume computation continues to be hard under bounded treewidth assumptions.
  • A central question in optimization is to maximize (or minimize) a linear function over a given polytope P. To solve such a problem in practice one needs a concise description of the polytope P. In this paper we are interested in representations of P using the positive semidefinite cone: a positive semidefinite lift (psd lift) of a polytope P is a representation of P as the projection of an affine slice of the positive semidefinite cone $\mathbf{S}^d_+$. Such a representation allows linear optimization problems over P to be written as semidefinite programs of size d. Such representations can be beneficial in practice when d is much smaller than the number of facets of the polytope P. In this paper we are concerned with so-called equivariant psd lifts (also known as symmetric psd lifts) which respect the symmetries of the polytope P. We present a representation-theoretic framework to study equivariant psd lifts of a certain class of symmetric polytopes known as orbitopes. Our main result is a structure theorem where we show that any equivariant psd lift of size d of an orbitope is of sum-of-squares type where the functions in the sum-of-squares decomposition come from an invariant subspace of dimension smaller than d^3. We use this framework to study two well-known families of polytopes, namely the parity polytope and the cut polytope, and we prove exponential lower bounds for equivariant psd lifts of these polytopes.
  • Let G be a finite abelian group. This paper is concerned with nonnegative functions on G that are sparse with respect to the Fourier basis. We establish combinatorial conditions on subsets S and T of Fourier basis elements under which nonnegative functions with Fourier support S are sums of squares of functions with Fourier support T. Our combinatorial condition involves constructing a chordal cover of a graph related to G and S (the Cayley graph Cay($\hat{G}$,S)) with maximal cliques related to T. Our result relies on two main ingredients: the decomposition of sparse positive semidefinite matrices with a chordal sparsity pattern, as well as a simple but key observation exploiting the structure of the Fourier basis elements of G. We apply our general result to two examples. First, in the case where $G = \mathbb{Z}_2^n$, by constructing a particular chordal cover of the half-cube graph, we prove that any nonnegative quadratic form in n binary variables is a sum of squares of functions of degree at most $\lceil n/2 \rceil$, establishing a conjecture of Laurent. Second, we consider nonnegative functions of degree d on $\mathbb{Z}_N$ (when d divides N). By constructing a particular chordal cover of the d'th power of the N-cycle, we prove that any such function is a sum of squares of functions with at most $3d\log(N/d)$ nonzero Fourier coefficients. Dually this shows that a certain cyclic polytope in $\mathbb{R}^{2d}$ with N vertices can be expressed as a projection of a section of the cone of psd matrices of size $3d\log(N/d)$. Putting $N=d^2$ gives a family of polytopes $P_d \subset \mathbb{R}^{2d}$ with LP extension complexity $\text{xc}_{LP}(P_d) = \Omega(d^2)$ and SDP extension complexity $\text{xc}_{PSD}(P_d) = O(d\log(d))$. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first explicit family of polytopes in increasing dimensions where $\text{xc}_{PSD}(P_d) = o(\text{xc}_{LP}(P_d))$.
  • The nonnegative rank of an entrywise nonnegative matrix A of size mxn is the smallest integer r such that A can be written as A=UV where U is mxr and V is rxn and U and V are both nonnegative. The nonnegative rank arises in different areas such as combinatorial optimization and communication complexity. Computing this quantity is NP-hard in general and it is thus important to find efficient bounding techniques especially in the context of the aforementioned applications. In this paper we propose a new lower bound on the nonnegative rank which, unlike most existing lower bounds, does not explicitly rely on the matrix sparsity pattern and applies to nonnegative matrices with arbitrary support. The idea involves computing a certain nuclear norm with nonnegativity constraints which allows to lower bound the nonnegative rank, in the same way the standard nuclear norm gives lower bounds on the standard rank. Our lower bound is expressed as the solution of a copositive programming problem and can be relaxed to obtain polynomial-time computable lower bounds using semidefinite programming. We compare our lower bound with existing ones, and we show examples of matrices where our lower bound performs better than currently known ones.
  • In this paper we show how to construct inner and outer convex approximations of a polytope from an approximate cone factorization of its slack matrix. This provides a robust generalization of the famous result of Yannakakis that polyhedral lifts of a polytope are controlled by (exact) nonnegative factorizations of its slack matrix. Our approximations behave well under polarity and have efficient representations using second order cones. We establish a direct relationship between the quality of the factorization and the quality of the approximations, and our results extend to generalized slack matrices that arise from a polytope contained in a polyhedron.
  • We consider the problem of jointly estimating the attitude and spin-rate of a spinning spacecraft. Psiaki (J. Astronautical Sci., 57(1-2):73--92, 2009) has formulated a family of optimization problems that generalize the classical least-squares attitude estimation problem, known as Wahba's problem, to the case of a spinning spacecraft. If the rotation axis is fixed and known, but the spin-rate is unknown (such as for nutation-damped spin-stabilized spacecraft) we show that Psiaki's problem can be reformulated exactly as a type of tractable convex optimization problem called a semidefinite optimization problem. This reformulation allows us to globally solve the problem using standard numerical routines for semidefinite optimization. It also provides a natural semidefinite relaxation-based approach to more complicated variations on the problem.
  • Model-based compressed sensing refers to compressed sensing with extra structure about the underlying sparse signal known a priori. Recent work has demonstrated that both for deterministic and probabilistic models imposed on the signal, this extra information can be successfully exploited to enhance recovery performance. In particular, weighted $\ell_1$-minimization with suitable choice of weights has been shown to improve performance in the so called non-uniform sparse model of signals. In this paper, we consider a full generalization of the non-uniform sparse model with very mild assumptions. We prove that when the measurements are obtained using a matrix with i.i.d Gaussian entries, weighted $\ell_1$-minimization successfully recovers the sparse signal from its measurements with overwhelming probability. We also provide a method to choose these weights for any general signal model from the non-uniform sparse class of signal models.
  • Given a polytope P in $\mathbb{R}^n$, we say that P has a positive semidefinite lift (psd lift) of size d if one can express P as the linear projection of an affine slice of the positive semidefinite cone $\mathbf{S}^d_+$. If a polytope P has symmetry, we can consider equivariant psd lifts, i.e. those psd lifts that respect the symmetry of P. One of the simplest families of polytopes with interesting symmetries are regular polygons in the plane, which have played an important role in the study of linear programming lifts (or extended formulations). In this paper we study equivariant psd lifts of regular polygons. We first show that the standard Lasserre/sum-of-squares hierarchy for the regular N-gon requires exactly ceil(N/4) iterations and thus yields an equivariant psd lift of size linear in N. In contrast we show that one can construct an equivariant psd lift of the regular 2^n-gon of size 2n-1, which is exponentially smaller than the psd lift of the sum-of-squares hierarchy. Our construction relies on finding a sparse sum-of-squares certificate for the facet-defining inequalities of the regular 2^n-gon, i.e., one that only uses a small (logarithmic) number of monomials. Since any equivariant LP lift of the regular 2^n-gon must have size 2^n, this gives the first example of a polytope with an exponential gap between sizes of equivariant LP lifts and equivariant psd lifts. Finally we prove that our construction is essentially optimal by showing that any equivariant psd lift of the regular N-gon must have size at least logarithmic in N.
  • We give explicit polynomial-sized (in $n$ and $k$) semidefinite representations of the hyperbolicity cones associated with the elementary symmetric polynomials of degree $k$ in $n$ variables. These convex cones form a family of non-polyhedral outer approximations of the non-negative orthant that preserve low-dimensional faces while successively discarding high-dimensional faces. More generally we construct explicit semidefinite representations (polynomial-sized in $k,m$, and $n$) of the hyperbolicity cones associated with $k$th directional derivatives of polynomials of the form $p(x) = \det(\sum_{i=1}^{n}A_i x_i)$ where the $A_i$ are $m\times m$ symmetric matrices. These convex cones form an analogous family of outer approximations to any spectrahedral cone. Our representations allow us to use semidefinite programming to solve the linear cone programs associated with these convex cones as well as their (less well understood) dual cones.
  • Let M be a p-by-q matrix with nonnegative entries. The positive semidefinite rank (psd rank) of M is the smallest integer k for which there exist positive semidefinite matrices $A_i, B_j$ of size $k \times k$ such that $M_{ij} = \text{trace}(A_i B_j)$. The psd rank has many appealing geometric interpretations, including semidefinite representations of polyhedra and information-theoretic applications. In this paper we develop and survey the main mathematical properties of psd rank, including its geometry, relationships with other rank notions, and computational and algorithmic aspects.
  • The nonnegative rank of a matrix A is the smallest integer r such that A can be written as the sum of r rank-one nonnegative matrices. The nonnegative rank has received a lot of attention recently due to its application in optimization, probability and communication complexity. In this paper we study a class of atomic rank functions defined on a convex cone which generalize several notions of "positive" ranks such as nonnegative rank or cp-rank (for completely positive matrices). The main contribution of the paper is a new method to obtain lower bounds for such ranks which improve on previously known bounds. Additionally the bounds we propose can be computed by semidefinite programming. The idea of the lower bound relies on an atomic norm approach where the atoms are self-scaled according to the vector (or matrix, in the case of nonnegative rank) of interest. This results in a lower bound that is invariant under scaling and that is at least as good as other existing norm-based bounds. We mainly focus our attention on the two important cases of nonnegative rank and cp-rank where our bounds satisfying interesting properties: For the nonnegative rank we show that our lower bound can be interpreted as a non-combinatorial version of the fractional rectangle cover number, while the sum-of-squares relaxation is closely related to the Lov\'asz theta number of the rectangle graph of the matrix. We also prove that the lower bound inherits many of the structural properties satisfied by the nonnegative rank such as invariance under diagonal scaling, subadditivity, etc. We also apply our method to obtain lower bounds on the cp-rank for completely positive matrices. In this case we prove that our lower bound is always greater than or equal the plain rank lower bound, and we show that it has interesting connections with combinatorial lower bounds based on edge-clique cover number.
  • We study the convex hull of $SO(n)$, thought of as the set of $n\times n$ orthogonal matrices with unit determinant, from the point of view of semidefinite programming. We show that the convex hull of $SO(n)$ is doubly spectrahedral, i.e. both it and its polar have a description as the intersection of a cone of positive semidefinite matrices with an affine subspace. Our spectrahedral representations are explicit, and are of minimum size, in the sense that there are no smaller spectrahedral representations of these convex bodies.
  • Distributed control problems under some specific information constraints can be formulated as (possibly infinite dimensional) convex optimization problems. The underlying motivation of this work is to develop an understanding of the optimal decision making architecture for such problems. In this paper, we particularly focus on the N-player triangular LQG problems and show that the optimal output feedback controllers have attractive state space realizations. The optimal controller can be synthesized using a set of stabilizing solutions to 2N linearly coupled algebraic Riccati equations, which turn out to be easily solvable under reasonable assumptions.
  • We introduce the framework of path-complete graph Lyapunov functions for approximation of the joint spectral radius. The approach is based on the analysis of the underlying switched system via inequalities imposed among multiple Lyapunov functions associated to a labeled directed graph. Inspired by concepts in automata theory and symbolic dynamics, we define a class of graphs called path-complete graphs, and show that any such graph gives rise to a method for proving stability of the switched system. This enables us to derive several asymptotically tight hierarchies of semidefinite programming relaxations that unify and generalize many existing techniques such as common quadratic, common sum of squares, and maximum/minimum-of-quadratics Lyapunov functions. We compare the quality of approximation obtained by certain classes of path-complete graphs including a family of dual graphs and all path-complete graphs with two nodes on an alphabet of two matrices. We provide approximation guarantees for several families of path-complete graphs, such as the De Bruijn graphs, establishing as a byproduct a constructive converse Lyapunov theorem for maximum/minimum-of-quadratics Lyapunov functions.
  • We introduce the notion of exchangeable equilibria of a symmetric bimatrix game, defined as those correlated equilibria in which players' strategy choices are conditionally independently and identically distributed given some hidden variable. We give several game-theoretic interpretations and a version of the "revelation principle". Geometrically, the set of exchangeable equilibria is convex and lies between the symmetric Nash equilibria and the symmetric correlated equilibria. Exchangeable equilibria can achieve higher expected utility than symmetric Nash equilibria.
  • There has been a lot of interest recently in proving lower bounds on the size of linear programs needed to represent a given polytope P. In a breakthrough paper Fiorini et al. [Proceedings of 44th ACM Symposium on Theory of Computing 2012, pages 95-106] showed that any linear programming formulation of maximum-cut must have exponential size. A natural question to ask is whether one can prove such strong lower bounds for semidefinite programming formulations. In this paper we take a step towards this goal and we prove strong lower bounds for a certain class of SDP formulations, namely SDPs over the Cartesian product of fixed-size positive semidefinite cones. In practice this corresponds to semidefinite programs with a block-diagonal structure and where blocks have constant size d. We show that any such extended formulation of the cut polytope must have exponential size (when d is fixed). The result of Fiorini et al. for LP formulations is obtained as a special case when d=1. For blocks of size d=2 the result rules out any small formulations using second-order cone programming. Our study of SDP lifts over Cartesian product of fixed-size positive semidefinite cones is motivated mainly from practical considerations where it is well known that such SDPs can be solved more efficiently than general SDPs. The proof of our lower bound relies on new results about the sparsity pattern of certain matrices with small psd rank, combined with an induction argument inspired from the recent paper by Kaibel and Weltge [arXiv:1307.3543] on the LP extension complexity of the correlation polytope.
  • We consider polynomial differential equations and make a number of contributions to the questions of (i) complexity of deciding stability, (ii) existence of polynomial Lyapunov functions, and (iii) existence of sum of squares (sos) Lyapunov functions. (i) We show that deciding local or global asymptotic stability of cubic vector fields is strongly NP-hard. Simple variations of our proof are shown to imply strong NP-hardness of several other decision problems: testing local attractivity of an equilibrium point, stability of an equilibrium point in the sense of Lyapunov, invariance of the unit ball, boundedness of trajectories, convergence of all trajectories in a ball to a given equilibrium point, existence of a quadratic Lyapunov function, local collision avoidance, and existence of a stabilizing control law. (ii) We present a simple, explicit example of a globally asymptotically stable quadratic vector field on the plane which does not admit a polynomial Lyapunov function (joint work with M. Krstic). For the subclass of homogeneous vector fields, we conjecture that asymptotic stability implies existence of a polynomial Lyapunov function, but show that the minimum degree of such a Lyapunov function can be arbitrarily large even for vector fields in fixed dimension and degree. For the same class of vector fields, we further establish that there is no monotonicity in the degree of polynomial Lyapunov functions. (iii) We show via an explicit counterexample that if the degree of the polynomial Lyapunov function is fixed, then sos programming may fail to find a valid Lyapunov function even though one exists. On the other hand, if the degree is allowed to increase, we prove that existence of a polynomial Lyapunov function for a planar or a homogeneous vector field implies existence of a polynomial Lyapunov function that is sos and that the negative of its derivative is also sos.