• We say that a finite set of red and blue points in the plane in general position can be $K_{1,3}$-covered if the set can be partitioned into subsets of size $4$, with $3$ points of one color and $1$ point of the other color, in such a way that, if at each subset the fourth point is connected by straight-line segments to the same-colored points, then the resulting set of all segments has no crossings. We consider the following problem: Given a set $R$ of $r$ red points and a set $B$ of $b$ blue points in the plane in general position, how many points of $R\cup B$ can be $K_{1,3}$-covered? and we prove the following results: (1) If $r=3g+h$ and $b=3h+g$, for some non-negative integers $g$ and $h$, then there are point sets $R\cup B$, like $\{1,3\}$-equitable sets (i.e., $r=3b$ or $b=3r$) and linearly separable sets, that can be $K_{1,3}$-covered. (2) If $r=3g+h$, $b=3h+g$ and the points in $R\cup B$ are in convex position, then at least $r+b-4$ points can be $K_{1,3}$-covered, and this bound is tight. (3) There are arbitrarily large point sets $R\cup B$ in general position, with $r=b+1$, such that at most $r+b-5$ points can be $K_{1,3}$-covered. (4) If $b\le r\le 3b$, then at least $\frac{8}{9}(r+b-8)$ points of $R\cup B$ can be $K_{1,3}$-covered. For $r>3b$, there are too many red points and at least $r-3b$ of them will remain uncovered in any $K_{1,3}$-covering. Furthermore, in all the cases we provide efficient algorithms to compute the corresponding coverings.
  • Let $S$ be a set of $n$ points in general position in the plane, $r$ of which are red and $b$ of which are blue. In this paper we prove that there exist: for every $\alpha \in \left [ 0,\frac{1}{2} \right ]$, a convex set containing exactly $\lceil \alpha r\rceil$ red points and exactly $\lceil \alpha b \rceil$ blue points of $S$; a convex set containing exactly $\left \lceil \frac{r+1}{2}\right \rceil$ red points and exactly $\left \lceil \frac{b+1}{2}\right \rceil$ blue points of $S$. Furthermore, we present polynomial time algorithms to find these convex sets. In the first case we provide an $O(n^4)$ time algorithm and an $O(n^2\log n)$ time algorithm in the second case. Finally, if $\lceil \alpha r\rceil+\lceil \alpha b\rceil$ is small, that is, not much larger than $\frac{1}{3}n$, we improve the running time to $O(n \log n)$.
  • We consider the Minimum Coverage Kernel problem: given a set B of $d$-dimensional boxes, find a subset of B of minimum size covering the same region as B. This problem is $\mathsf{NP}$-hard, but as for many $\mathsf{NP}$-hard problems on graphs, the problem becomes solvable in polynomial time under restrictions on the graph induced by $B$. We consider various classes of graphs, show that Minimum Coverage Kernel remains $\mathsf{NP}$-hard even for severely restricted instances, and provide two polynomial time approximation algorithms for this problem.
  • We consider a natural notion of search trees on graphs, which we show is ubiquitous in various areas of discrete mathematics and computer science. Search trees on graphs can be modified by local operations called rotations, which generalize rotations in binary search trees. The rotation graph of search trees on a graph $G$ is the skeleton of a polytope called the graph associahedron of $G$. We consider the case where the graph $G$ is a tree. We construct a family of trees $G$ on $n$ vertices and pairs of search trees on $G$ such that the minimum number of rotations required to transform one search tree into the other is $\Omega (n\log n)$. This implies that the worst-case diameter of tree associahedra is $\Theta (n\log n)$, which answers a question from Thibault Manneville and Vincent Pilaud. The proof relies on a notion of projection of a search tree which may be of independent interest.
  • We study the cyclic color sequences induced at infinity by colored rays with apices being a given balanced finite bichromatic point set. We first study the case in which the rays are required to be pairwise disjoint. We derive a lower bound on the number of color sequences that can be realized from any such fixed point set and examine color sequences that can be realized regardless of the point set, exhibiting negative examples as well. We also provide a tight upper bound on the number of configurations that can be realized from a point set, and point sets for which there are asymptotically less configurations than that number. In addition, we provide algorithms to decide whether a color sequence is realizable from a given point set in a line or in general position. We address afterwards the variant of the problem where the rays are allowed to intersect. We prove that for some configurations and point sets, the number of ray crossings must be $\Theta(n^2)$ and study then configurations that can be realized by rays that pairwise cross. We show that there are point sets for which the number of configurations that can be realized by pairwise-crossing rays is asymptotically smaller than the number of configurations realizable by pairwise-disjoint rays. We provide also point sets from which any configuration can be realized by pairwise-crossing rays and show that there is no configuration that can be realized by pairwise-crossing rays from every point set.
  • Motivated by the analysis of range queries in databases, we introduce the computation of the Depth Distribution of a set $\mathcal{B}$ of axis aligned boxes, whose computation generalizes that of the Klee's Measure and of the Maximum Depth. In the worst case over instances of fixed input size $n$, we describe an algorithm of complexity within $O({n^\frac{d+1}{2}\log n})$, using space within $O({n\log n})$, mixing two techniques previously used to compute the Klee's Measure. We refine this result and previous results on the Klee's Measure and the Maximum Depth for various measures of difficulty of the input, such as the profile of the input and the degeneracy of the intersection graph formed by the boxes.
  • An edge-ordered graph is a graph with a total ordering of its edges. A path $P=v_1v_2\ldots v_k$ in an edge-ordered graph is called increasing if $(v_iv_{i+1}) > (v_{i+1}v_{i+2})$ for all $i = 1,\ldots,k-2$; it is called decreasing if $(v_iv_{i+1}) < (v_{i+1}v_{i+2})$ for all $i = 1,\ldots,k-2$. We say that $P$ is monotone if it is increasing or decreasing. A rooted tree $T$ in an edge-ordered graph is called monotone if either every path from the root of to a leaf is increasing or every path from the root to a leaf is decreasing. A geometric graph is a graph whose vertices are points in the plane and whose edges are straight line segments. Let $G$ be a graph. Let $\overline{\alpha}(G)$ be the maximum integer such that every edge-ordered geometric graph isomorphic to $G$ %under any edge labeling contains a monotone non-crossing path of length $\overline{\alpha}(G)$. Let $\overline{\tau}(G)$ be the maximum integer such that every edge-ordered geometric graph isomorphic to $G$ %under any edge labeling contains a monotone non-crossing complete binary tree of size $\overline{\tau}(G)$. In this paper we show that $\overline \alpha(K_n) = \Omega(\log\log n)$, $\overline \alpha(K_n) = O(\log n)$, $\overline \tau(K_n) = \Omega(\log\log \log n)$ and $\overline \tau(K_n) = O(\sqrt{n \log n})$.
  • Given a convex polygon of $n$ sides, one can draw $n$ disks (called side disks) where each disk has a different side of the polygon as diameter and the midpoint of the side as its center. The intersection graph of such disks is the undirected graph with vertices the $n$ disks and two disks are adjacent if and only if they have a point in common. We prove that for every convex polygon this graph is planar. Particularly, for $n=5$, this shows that for any convex pentagon there are two disks among the five side disks that do not intersect, which means that $K_5$ is never the intersection graph of such five disks. For $n=6$, we then have that for any convex hexagon the intersection graph of the side disks does not contain $K_{3,3}$ as subgraph.
  • In 2001, K\'arolyi, Pach and T\'oth introduced a family of point sets to solve an Erd\H{o}s-Szekeres type problem; which have been used to solve several other Ed\H{o}s-Szekeres type problems. In this paper we refer to these sets as nested almost convex sets. A nested almost convex set $\mathcal{X}$ has the property that the interior of every triangle determined by three points in the same convex layer of $\mathcal{X}$, contains exactly one point of $\mathcal{X}$. In this paper, we introduce a characterization of nested almost convex sets. Our characterization implies that there exists at most one (up to order type) nested almost convex set of $n$ points. We use our characterization to obtain a linear time algorithm to construct nested almost convex sets of $n$ points, with integer coordinates of absolute values at most $O(n^{\log_2 5})$. Finally, we use our characterization to obtain an $O(n\log n)$-time algorithm to determine whether a set of points is a nested almost convex set.
  • Given two point sets $R$ and $B$ in the plane, with cardinalities $m$ and $n$, respectively, and each set stored in a separate R-tree, we present an algorithm to decide whether $R$ and $B$ are linearly separable. Our algorithm exploits the structure of the R-trees, loading into the main memory only relevant data, and runs in $O(m\log m + n\log n)$ time in the worst case. As experimental results, we implement the proposed algorithm and executed it on several real and synthetic point sets, showing that the percentage of nodes of the R-trees that are accessed and the memory usage are low in these cases. We also present an algorithm to compute the convex hull of $n$ planar points given in an R-tree, running in $O(n\log n)$ time in the worst case.
  • The KLEE'S MESURE of $n$ axis-parallel boxes in $\mathbb{R}^d$ is the volume of their union. It can be computed in time within $O(n^{d/2})$ in the worst case. We describe three techniques to boost its computation: one based on some type of "degeneracy'' of the input, and two ones on the inherent "easiness'' of the structure of the input. The first technique benefits from instances where the MAXIMA of the input is of small size $h$, and yields a solution running in time within $O(n\log^{2d-2}{h}+ h^{d/2}) \subseteq O(n^{d/2}$). The second technique takes advantage of instances where no $d$-dimensional axis-aligned hyperplane intersects more than $k$ boxes in some dimension, and yields a solution running in time within $O(n \log n + n k^{(d-2)/2}) \subseteq O(n^{d/2})$. The third technique takes advantage of instances where the \emph{intersection graph} of the input has small treewidth $\omega$. It yields an algorithm running in time within $O(n^4\omega \log \omega + n (\omega \log \omega)^{d/2})$ in general, and in time within $O(n \log n + n \omega ^{d/2})$ if an optimal tree decomposition of the intersection graph is given. We show how to combine these techniques in an algorithm which takes advantage of all three configurations.
  • Divide-and-conquer is a central paradigm for the design of algorithms, through which some fundamental computational problems, such as sorting arrays and computing convex hulls, are solved in optimal time within $\Theta(n\log{n})$ in the worst case over instances of size $n$. A finer analysis of those problems yields complexities within $O(n(1 + \mathcal{H}(n_1, \dots, n_k))) \subseteq O(n(1{+}\log{k})) \subseteq O(n\log{n})$ in the worst case over all instances of size $n$ composed of $k$ "easy" fragments of respective sizes $n_1, \dots, n_k$ summing to $n$, where the entropy function $\mathcal{H}(n_1, \dots, n_k) = \sum_{i=1}^k{\frac{n_i}{n}}\log{\frac{n}{n_i}}$ measures the "difficulty" of the instance. We consider whether such refined analysis can be applied to other algorithms based on divide-and-conquer, such as polynomial multiplication, input-order adaptive computation of convex hulls in 2D and 3D, and computation of Delaunay triangulations.
  • Given a set $P$ of $n$ points in the plane, we study the computation of the probability distribution function of both the area and perimeter of the convex hull of a random subset $S$ of $P$. The random subset $S$ is formed by drawing each point $p$ of $P$ independently with a given rational probability $\pi_p$. For both measures of the convex hull, we show that it is \#P-hard to compute the probability that the measure is at least a given bound $w$. For $\varepsilon\in(0,1)$, we provide an algorithm that runs in $O(n^{6}/\varepsilon)$ time and returns a value that is between the probability that the area is at least $w$, and the probability that the area is at least $(1-\varepsilon)w$. For the perimeter, we show a similar algorithm running in $O(n^{6}/\varepsilon)$ time. Finally, given $\varepsilon,\delta\in(0,1)$ and for any measure, we show an $O(n\log n+ (n/\varepsilon^2)\log(1/\delta))$-time Monte Carlo algorithm that returns a value that, with probability of success at least $1-\delta$, differs at most $\varepsilon$ from the probability that the measure is at least $w$.
  • The Swap-Insert Correction distance from a string $S$ of length $n$ to another string $L$ of length $m\geq n$ on the alphabet $[1..d]$ is the minimum number of insertions, and swaps of pairs of adjacent symbols, converting $S$ into $L$. Contrarily to other correction distances, computing it is NP-Hard in the size $d$ of the alphabet. We describe an algorithm computing this distance in time within $O(d^2 nm g^{d-1})$, where there are $n_\alpha$ occurrences of $\alpha$ in $S$, $m_\alpha$ occurrences of $\alpha$ in $L$, and where $g=\max_{\alpha\in[1..d]} \min\{n_\alpha,m_\alpha-n_\alpha\}$ measures the difficulty of the instance. The difficulty $g$ is bounded by above by various terms, such as the length of the shortest string $S$, and by the maximum number of occurrences of a single character in $S$. Those results illustrate how, in many cases, the correction distance between two strings can be easier to compute than in the worst case scenario.
  • A set of intervals is independent when the intervals are pairwise disjoint. In the interval selection problem we are given a set $\mathbb{I}$ of intervals and we want to find an independent subset of intervals of largest cardinality. Let $\alpha(\mathbb{I})$ denote the cardinality of an optimal solution. We discuss the estimation of $\alpha(\mathbb{I})$ in the streaming model, where we only have one-time, sequential access to the input intervals, the endpoints of the intervals lie in $\{1,...,n \}$, and the amount of the memory is constrained. For intervals of different sizes, we provide an algorithm in the data stream model that computes an estimate $\hat\alpha$ of $\alpha(\mathbb{I})$ that, with probability at least $2/3$, satisfies $\tfrac 12(1-\varepsilon) \alpha(\mathbb{I}) \le \hat\alpha \le \alpha(\mathbb{I})$. For same-length intervals, we provide another algorithm in the data stream model that computes an estimate $\hat\alpha$ of $\alpha(\mathbb{I})$ that, with probability at least $2/3$, satisfies $\tfrac 23(1-\varepsilon) \alpha(\mathbb{I}) \le \hat\alpha \le \alpha(\mathbb{I})$. The space used by our algorithms is bounded by a polynomial in $\varepsilon^{-1}$ and $\log n$. We also show that no better estimations can be achieved using $o(n)$ bits of storage. We also develop new, approximate solutions to the interval selection problem, where we want to report a feasible solution, that use $O(\alpha(\mathbb{I}))$ space. Our algorithms for the interval selection problem match the optimal results by Emek, Halld{\'o}rsson and Ros{\'e}n [Space-Constrained Interval Selection, ICALP 2012], but are much simpler.
  • We consider a natural variation of the concept of stabbing a segment by a simple polygon: a segment is stabbed by a simple polygon $\mathcal{P}$ if at least one of its two endpoints is contained in $\mathcal{P}$. A segment set $S$ is stabbed by $\mathcal{P}$ if every segment of $S$ is stabbed by $\mathcal{P}$. We show that if $S$ is a set of pairwise disjoint segments, the problem of computing the minimum perimeter polygon stabbing $S$ can be solved in polynomial time. We also prove that for general segments the problem is NP-hard. Further, an adaptation of our polynomial-time algorithm solves an open problem posed by L\"offler and van Kreveld [Algorithmica 56(2), 236--269 (2010)] about finding a maximum perimeter convex hull for a set of imprecise points modeled as line segments.
  • Finding a maximum independent set (MIS) of a given fam- ily of axis-parallel rectangles is a basic problem in computational geom- etry and combinatorics. This problem has attracted significant atten- tion since the sixties, when Wegner conjectured that the corresponding duality gap, i.e., the maximum possible ratio between the maximum independent set and the minimum hitting set (MHS), is bounded by a universal constant. An interesting special case, that may prove use- ful to tackling the general problem, is the diagonal-intersecting case, in which the given family of rectangles is intersected by a diagonal. Indeed, Chepoi and Felsner recently gave a factor 6 approximation algorithm for MHS in this setting, and showed that the duality gap is between 3/2 and 6. In this paper we improve upon these results. First we show that MIS in diagonal-intersecting families is NP-complete, providing one smallest subclass for which MIS is provably hard. Then, we derive an $O(n^2)$-time algorithm for the maximum weight independent set when, in addition the rectangles intersect below the diagonal. This improves and extends a classic result of Lubiw, and amounts to obtain a 2-approximation algo- rithm for the maximum weight independent set of rectangles intersecting a diagonal. Finally, we prove that for diagonal-intersecting families the duality gap is between 2 and 4. The upper bound, which implies an approximation algorithm of the same factor, follows from a simple com- binatorial argument, while the lower bound represents the best known lower bound on the duality gap, even in the general case.
  • In 1926, Jarn\'ik introduced the problem of drawing a convex $n$-gon with vertices having integer coordinates. He constructed such a drawing in the grid $[1,c\cdot n^{3/2}]^2$ for some constant $c>0$, and showed that this grid size is optimal up to a constant factor. We consider the analogous problem for drawing the double circle, and prove that it can be done within the same grid size. Moreover, we give an O(n)-time algorithm to construct such a point set.
  • We study a variation of the 1-center problem in which, in addition to a single supply facility, we are allowed to locate a highway. This highway increases the transportation speed between any demand point and the facility. That is, given a set $S$ of points and $v>1$, we are interested in locating the facility point $f$ and the highway $h$ that minimize the expression $\max_{p\in S}d_{h}(p,f)$, where $d_h$ is the time needed to travel between $p$ and $f$. We consider two types of highways ({\em freeways} and {\em turnpikes}) and study the cases in which the highway's length is fixed by the user (or can be modified to further decrease the transportation time).
  • In this paper we study a facility location problem in the plane in which a single point (facility) and a rapid transit line (highway) are simultaneously located in order to minimize the total travel time from the clients to the facility, using the $L_1$ or Manhattan metric. The rapid transit line is given by a segment with any length and orientation, and is an alternative transportation line that can be used by the clients to reduce their travel time to the facility. We study the variant of the problem in which clients can enter and exit the highway at any point. We provide an $O(n^3)$-time algorithm that solves this variant, where $n$ is the number of clients. We also present a detailed characterization of the solutions, which depends on the speed given in the highway.
  • Given a set $S$ of $n$ points in the plane, a \emph{radial ordering} of $S$ with respect to a point $p$ (not in $S$) is a clockwise circular ordering of the elements in $S$ by angle around $p$. If $S$ is two-colored, a \emph{colored radial ordering} is a radial ordering of $S$ in which only the colors of the points are considered. In this paper, we obtain bounds on the number of distinct non-colored and colored radial orderings of $S$. We assume a strong general position on $S$, not three points are collinear and not three lines---each passing through a pair of points in $S$---intersect in a point of $\R^2\setminus S$. In the colored case, $S$ is a set of $2n$ points partitioned into $n$ red and $n$ blue points, and $n$ is even. We prove that: the number of distinct radial orderings of $S$ is at most $O(n^4)$ and at least $\Omega(n^3)$; the number of colored radial orderings of $S$ is at most $O(n^4)$ and at least $\Omega(n)$; there exist sets of points with $\Theta(n^4)$ colored radial orderings and sets of points with only $O(n^2)$ colored radial orderings.