• We suggest that coarsening dynamics can be described in terms of a generalized random walk, with the dynamics of the growing length $L(t)$ controlled by a drift term, $\mu(L)$, and a diffusive one, ${\cal D}(L)$. We apply this interpretation to the one dimensional Ising model with a ferromagnetic coupling constant decreasing exponentially on the scale $R$. In the case of non conserved (Glauber) dynamics, both terms are present and their balance depend on the interplay between $L(t)$ and $R$. In the case of conserved (Kawasaki) dynamics, drift is negligible, but ${\cal D}(L)$ is strongly dependent on $L$. The main pre-asymptotic regime displays a speeding of coarsening for Glauber dynamics and a slowdown for Kawasaki dynamics. We reason that a similar behaviour can be found in two dimensions.
  • The Discrete NonLinear Schr\"odinger (DNLS) equation displays a parameter region characterized by the presence of localized excitations (breathers). While their formation is well understood and it is expected that the asymptotic configuration comprises a single breather on top of a background, it is not clear why the dynamics of a multi-breather configuration is essentially frozen. In order to investigate this question, we introduce simple stochastic models, characterized by suitable conservation laws. We focus on the role of the coupling strength between localized excitations and background. In the DNLS model, higher breathers interact more weakly, as a result of their faster rotation. In our stochastic models, the strength of the coupling is controlled directly by an amplitude-dependent parameter. In the case of a power-law decrease, the associated coarsening process undergoes a slowing down if the decay rate is larger than a critical value. In the case of an exponential decrease, a freezing effect is observed that is reminiscent of the scenario observed in the DNLS. This last regime arises spontaneously when direct energy diffusion between breathers and background is blocked below a certain threshold.
  • We discuss the nonlinear dynamics and fluctuations of interfaces with bending rigidity under the competing attractions of two walls with arbitrary permeabilities. This system mimics the dynamics of confined membranes. We use a two-dimension hydrodynamic model, where membranes are effectively one-dimensional objects. In a previous work [T. Le Goff et al, Phys. Rev. E 90, 032114 (2014)], we have shown that this model predicts frozen states caused by bending rigidity-induced oscillatory interactions between kinks (or domain walls). We here demonstrate that in the presence of tension, potential asymmetry, or thermal noise, there is a finite threshold above which frozen states disappear, and perpetual coarsening is restored. Depending on the driving force, the transition to coarsening exhibits different scenarios. First, for membranes under tension, small tensions can only lead to transient coarsening or partial disordering, while above a finite threshold, membrane oscillations disappear and perpetual coarsening is found. Second, potential asymmetry is relevant in the non-conserved case only, i.e. for permeable walls, where it induces a drift force on the kinks, leading to a fast coarsening process via kink-antikink annihilation. However, below some threshold, the drift force can be balanced by the oscillatory interactions between kinks, and frozen adhesion patches can still be observed. Finally, at long times, noise restores coarsening with standard exponents depending on the permeability of the walls. However, the typical time for the appearance of coarsening exhibits an Arrhenius form. As a consequence, a finite noise amplitude is needed in order to observe coarsening in observable time.
  • It is well known that the dynamics of a one-dimensional dissipative system driven by the Ginzburg-Landau free energy may be described in terms of interacting kinks: two neighbouring kinks at distance $\ell$ feel an attractive force $F(\ell)\approx\exp(-\ell)$. This result is typical of a bistable system whose inhomogeneities have an energy cost due to surface tension, but for some physical systems bending rigidity rather than surface tension plays a leading role. We show that a kink dynamics is still applicable, but the force $F(\ell)$ is now oscillating, therefore producing configurations which are locally stable. We also propose a new derivation of kink dynamics, which applies to a generalized Ginzburg-Landau free energy with an arbitrary combination of surface tension, bending energy, and higher-order terms. Our derivation is not based on a specific multikink approximation and the resulting kink dynamics reproduces correctly the full dynamics of the original model. This allows to use our derivation with confidence in place of the continuum dynamics, reducing simulation time by orders of magnitude.
  • This is the list of original contributions to the Comptes Rendus Physique Issue on Coarsening Dynamics (Vol. 16, Issue 3, 2015).
  • In this paper we focus on crystal surfaces led out of equilibrium by a growth or erosion process. As a consequence of that the surface may undergo morphological instabilities and develop a distinct structure: ondulations, mounds or pyramids, bunches of steps, ripples. The typical size of the emergent pattern may be fixed or it may increase in time through a coarsening process which in turn may last forever or it may be interrupted at some relevant length scale. We study dynamics in three different cases, stressing the main physical ingredients and the main features of coarsening: a kinetic instability, an energetic instability, and an athermal instability.
  • Phase separation may be driven by the minimization of a suitable free energy ${\cal F}$. This is the case, e.g., for diblock copolimer melts, where ${\cal F}$ is minimized by a steady periodic pattern whose wavelength $\lambda_{GS}$ depends on the segregation strength $\alpha^{-1}$ and it is know since long time that in one spatial dimension $\lambda_{GS} \simeq \alpha^{-1/3}$. Here we study in details the dynamics of the system in 1D for different initial conditions and by varying $\alpha$ by five orders of magnitude. We find that, depending on the initial state, the final configuration may have a wavelength $\lambda_{D}$ with $\lambda_{min}(\alpha)<\lambda_{D}<\lambda_{max}(\alpha)$, where $\lambda_{min} \approx \ln (1/\alpha)$ and $\lambda_{max}\approx \alpha^{-1/2}$. In particular, if the initial state is homogeneous, the system exhibits a logarithmic coarsening process which arrests whenever $\lambda_{D}\approx\lambda_{min}$.
  • The adhesion dynamics of a membrane confined between two permeable walls is studied using a two-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The membrane morphology decomposes into adhesion patches on the upper and the lower walls and obeys a nonlinear evolution equation that resembles that of phase separation dynamics, which is known to lead to coarsening, i.e. to the endless growth of the adhesion patches. However, due to the membrane bending rigidity the system evolves towards a frozen state without coarsening. This frozen state exhibits an order-disorder transition when increasing the permeability of the walls.
  • Antiferromagnetic chains with an odd number of spins are known to undergo a transition from an antiparallel to a spin-flop configuration when subjected to an increasing magnetic field. We show that in the presence of an anisotropy favoring alignment perpendicular to the field, the spin-flop state appears for both weak and strong field, the antiparallel state appearing for intermediate fields. Both transitions are second order, the configuration varying continuously with the field intensity. Such re-entrant transition is robust with respect to quantum fluctuations and it might be observed in different types of nanomagnets.
  • Universality has been a key concept for the classification of equilibrium critical phenomena, allowing associations among different physical processes and models. When dealing with non-equilibrium problems, however, the distinction in universality classes is not as clear and few are the examples, as phase separation and kinetic roughening, for which universality has allowed to classify results in a general spirit. Here we focus on an out-of-equilibrium case, unstable crystal growth, lying in between phase ordering and pattern formation. We consider a well established 2+1 dimensional family of continuum nonlinear equations for the local height $h(\mathbf{x},t)$ of a crystal surface having the general form ${\partial_t h(\mathbf{x},t)} = -\mathbf{\nabla}\cdot {[\mathbf{j}(\nabla h) + \mathbf{\nabla}(\nabla^2 h)]}$: $\mathbf{j}(\nabla h)$ is an arbitrary function, which is linear for small $\nabla h$, and whose structure expresses instabilities which lead to the formation of pyramid-like structures of planar size $L$ and height $H$. Our task is the choice and calculation of the quantities that can operate as critical exponents, together with the discussion of what is relevant or not to the definition of our universality class. These aims are achieved by means of a perturbative, multiscale analysis of our model, leading to phase diffusion equations whose diffusion coefficients encapsulate all relevant informations on dynamics. We identify two critical exponents: i) the coarsening exponent, $n$, controlling the increase in time of the typical size of the pattern, $L\sim t^n$; ii) the exponent $\beta$, controlling the increase in time of the typical slope of the pattern, $M \sim t^{\beta}$ where $M\approx H/L$. Our study reveals that there are only two different universality classes...
  • We investigate the coarsening evolution occurring in a simplified stochastic model of the Discrete NonLinear Schr\"odinger (DNLS) equation in the so-called negative-temperature region. We provide an explanation of the coarsening exponent $n=1/3$, by invoking an analogy with a suitable exclusion process. In spite of the equivalence with the exponent observed in other known universality classes, this model is certainly different, in that it refers to a dynamics with two conservation laws.
  • Many nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) display a coarsening dynamics, i.e., an emerging pattern whose typical length scale $L$ increases with time. The so-called coarsening exponent $n$ characterizes the time dependence of the scale of the pattern, $L(t)\approx t^n$, and coarsening dynamics can be described by a diffusion equation for the phase of the pattern. By means of a multiscale analysis we are able to find the analytical expression of such diffusion equations. Here, we propose a recipe to implement numerically the determination of $D(\lambda)$, the phase diffusion coefficient, as a function of the wavelength $\lambda$ of the base steady state $u_0(x)$. $D$ carries all information about coarsening dynamics and, through the relation $|D(L)| \simeq L^2 /t$, it allows us to determine the coarsening exponent. The main conceptual message is that the coarsening exponent is determined without solving a time-dependent equation, but only by inspecting the periodic steady-state solutions. This provides a much faster strategy than a forward time-dependent calculation. We discuss our method for several different PDEs, both conserved and not conserved.
  • The foundation of continuum elasticity theory is based on two general principles: (i) the force felt by a small volume element from its surrounding acts only through its surface (the Cauchy principle, justified by the fact that interactions are of short range and are therefore localized at the boundary); (ii) the stress tensor must be symmetric in order to prevent spontaneous rotation of the material points. These two requirements are presented to be necessary in classical textbooks on elasticity theory. By using only basic spatial symmetries it is shown that elastodynamics equations can be derived, for high symmetry crystals (the typical case considered in most textbooks), without evoking any of the two above physical principles.
  • Moving crystal surfaces can undergo step-bunching instabilities, when subject to an electric current. We show analytically that an infinitesimal quantity of a dopant may invert the stability, whatever the sign of the current. Our study is relevant for experimental results [S. S. Kosolobov et al., JETP Lett. 81, 117 (2005)] on an evaporating Si(111) surface, which show a singular response to Au doping, whose density distribution is related to inhomogeneous Si diffusion.
  • Crystal surfaces may undergo thermodynamical as well kinetic, out-of-equilibrium instabilities. We consider the case of mound and pyramid formation, a common phenomenon in crystal growth and a long-standing problem in the field of pattern formation and coarsening dynamics. We are finally able to attack the problem analytically and get rigorous results. Three dynamical scenarios are possible: perpetual coarsening, interrupted coarsening, and no coarsening. In the perpetual coarsening scenario, mound size increases in time as L=t^n, where the coasening exponent is n=1/3 when faceting occurs, otherwise n=1/4.
  • Quenched disorder affects how non-equilibrium systems respond to driving. In the context of artificial spin ice, an athermal system comprised of geometrically frustrated classical Ising spins with a two-fold degenerate ground state, we give experimental and numerical evidence of how such disorder washes out edge effects, and provide an estimate of disorder strength in the experimental system. We prove analytically that a sequence of applied fields with fixed amplitude is unable to drive the system to its ground state from a saturated state. These results should be relevant for other systems where disorder does not change the nature of the ground state.
  • We have performed a systematic study of the effects of field strength and quenched disorder on the driven dynamics of square artificial spin ice. We construct a network representation of the configurational phase space, where nodes represent the microscopic configurations and a directed link between node i and node j means that the field may induce a transition between the corresponding configurations. In this way, we are able to quantitatively describe how the field and the disorder affect the connectedness of states and the reversibility of dynamics. In particular, we have shown that for optimal field strengths, a substantial fraction of all states can be accessed using external driving fields, and this fraction is increased by disorder. We discuss how this relates to control and potential information storage applications for artificial spin ices.
  • We report a novel approach to the question of whether and how the ground state can be achieved in square artificial spin ices where frustration is incomplete. We identify two types of disorder: quenched disorder in the island response to fields and disorder in the sequence of driving fields. Numerical simulations show that quenched disorder can lead to final states with lower energy, and disorder in the driving fields always lowers the final energy attained by the system. We use a network picture to understand these two effects: disorder in island responses creates new dynamical pathways, and disorder in driving fields allows more pathways to be followed.
  • The field-induced dynamics of artificial spin ice are determined in part by interactions between magnetic islands, and the switching characteristics of each island. Disorder in either of these affects the response to applied fields. Numerical simulations are used to show that disorder effects are determined primarily by the strength of disorder relative to inter-island interactions, rather than by the type of disorder. Weak and strong disorder regimes exist and can be defined in a quantitative way.
  • The measuring stations of a geophysical network are often spatially distributed in an inhomogeneous manner. The areal inhomogeneity can be well characterized by the fractal dimension D_H of the network, which is usually smaller than the euclidean dimension of the surface, this latter equal to 2. The resulting dimensional deficit, (2-D_H), is a measure of precipitating events which cannot be detected by the network. The aim of the present study is to estimate the fractal dimension of a rain-gauge network in Tuscany (Central Italy) and to relate its dimension to the dimensions of daily rainfall events detected by a mixed satellite/radar methodology. We find that D_H = 1.85, while typical summer precipitations are characterized by a dimension much greater than the dimensional deficit 0.15.
  • In a recent paper published in this journal [J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 42 (2009) 495004] we studied a one-dimensional particles system where nearest particles attract with a force inversely proportional to a power \alpha of their distance and coalesce upon encounter. Numerics yielded a distribution function h(z) for the gap between neighbouring particles, with h(z)=z^{\beta(\alpha)} for small z and \beta(\alpha)>\alpha. We can now prove analytically that in the strict limit of z\to 0, \beta=\alpha for \alpha>0, corresponding to the mean-field result, and we compute the length scale where mean-field breaks down. More generally, in that same limit correlations are negligible for any similar reaction model where attractive forces diverge with vanishing distance. The actual meaning of the measured exponent \beta(\alpha) remains an open question.
  • Local magnetic ordering in artificial spin ices is discussed from the point of view of how geometrical frustration controls dynamics and the approach to steady state. We discuss the possibility of using a particle picture based on vertex configurations to interpret time evolution of magnetic configurations. Analysis of possible vertex processes allows us to anticipate different behaviors for open and closed edges and the existence of different field regimes. Numerical simulations confirm these results and also demonstrate the importance of correlations and long range interactions in understanding particle population evolution. We also show that a mean field model of vertex dynamics gives important insights into finite size effects.
  • We study a one-dimensional particles system, in the overdamped limit, where nearest particles attract with a force inversely proportional to a power of their distance and coalesce upon encounter. The detailed shape of the distribution function for the gap between neighbouring particles serves to discriminate between different laws of attraction. We develop an exact Fokker-Planck approach for the infinite hierarchy of distribution functions for multiple adjacent gaps and solve it exactly, at the mean-field level, where correlations are ignored. The crucial role of correlations and their effect on the gap distribution function is explored both numerically and analytically. Finally, we analyse a random input of particles, which results in a stationary state where the effect of correlations is largely diminished.
  • Instabilities and pattern formation is the rule in nonequilibrium systems. Selection of a persistent lengthscale, or coarsening (increase of the lengthscale with time) are the two major alternatives. When and under which conditions one dynamics prevails over the other is a longstanding problem, particularly beyond one dimension. It is shown that the challenge can be defied in two dimensions, using the concept of phase diffusion equation. We find that coarsening is related to the \lambda-dependence of a suitable phase diffusion coefficient, D_{11}(\lambda), depending on lattice symmetry and conservation laws. These results are exemplified analytically on prototypical nonlinear equations.
  • Magnetic superlattices and nanowires may be described as Heisenberg spin chains of finite length N, where N is the number of magnetic units (films or atoms, respectively). We study antiferromagnetically coupled spins which are also coupled to an external field H (superlattices) or to a ferromagnetic substrate (nanowires). The model is analyzed through a two-dimensional map which allows fast and reliable numerical calculations. Both open and closed chains have different properties for even and odd N (parity effect). Open chains with odd N are known [S.Lounis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 107204 (2008)] to have a ferrimagnetic state for small N and a noncollinear state for large N. In the present paper, the transition length N_c is found analytically. Finally, we show that closed chains arrange themselves in the uniform bulk spin-flop state for even N and in nonuniform states for odd N.