• The physical, observable spectrum in gauge theories is made up from gauge-invariant states. The Fr\"ohlich-Morchio-Strocchi mechanism allows in the standard model to map these states to the gauge-dependent elementary $W$, $Z$ and Higgs states. This is no longer necessarily the case in theories with a more general gauge group and Higgs sector. We classify and predict the physical spectrum for a wide range of such theories, with special emphasis on GUT-like cases, and show that discrepancies between the spectrum of elementary fields and physical particles frequently arise.
  • In gauge theories, the physical, experimentally observable spectrum consists only of gauge-invariant states. This spectrum can be different from the elementary spectrum even at weak coupling and in the presence of the Brout-Englert-Higgs effect. We demonstrate this for an SU(3) gauge theory with a single fundamental Higgs, a toy theory for grand-unified theories. The manifestly gauge-invariant approach of lattice gauge theory is used to determine the spectrum in four different channels. It is found to be qualitatively different from the elementary one, and especially from the one predicted by standard perturbation theory. The result can be understood in terms of the Froehlich-Morchio-Strocchi mechanism. In fact, we find that analytic methods based on this mechanism, a gauge-invariant extension of perturbation theory, correctly determines the spectrum, and gives already at leading order a reasonably good quantitative description. Together with previous results this supports that this approach is the analytic method of choice for theories with a Brout-Englert-Higgs effect.
  • In gauge theories, the physical, experimentally observable spectrum consists only of gauge-invariant states. In the standard model the Fr\"ohlich-Morchio-Strocchi mechanism shows that these states can be adequately mapped to the gauge-dependent elementary W, Z, Higgs, and fermions. In theories with a more general gauge group and Higgs sector, appearing in various extensions of the standard model, this has not to be the case. In this work we determine analytically the physical spectrum of $\mathrm{SU}(N>2)$ gauge theories with a Higgs field in the fundamental representation. We show that discrepancies between the spectrum predicted by perturbation theory and the observable physical spectrum arise. We confirm these analytic findings with lattice simulations for $N=3$.
  • Gauge-invariant perturbation theory for theories with a Brout-Englert-Higgs effect, as developed by Fr\"ohlich, Morchio and Strocchi, starts out from physical, exactly gauge-invariant quantities as initial and final states. These are composite operators, and can thus be considered as bound states. In case of the standard model, this reduces almost entirely to conventional perturbation theory. This explains the success of conventional perturbation theory for the standard model. However, this is due to the special structure of the standard model, and it is not guaranteed to be the case for other theories. Here, we review gauge-invariant perturbation theory. Especially, we show how it can be applied and that it is little more complicated than conventional perturbation theory, and that it is often possible to utilize existing results of conventional perturbation theory. Finally, we present tests of the predictions of gauge-invariant perturbation theory, using lattice gauge theory, in three different settings. In one case, the results coincide with conventional perturbation theory and with the lattice results. In a second case, it appears that the results of gauge-invariant perturbation theory agree with the lattice, but differ from conventional perturbation theory. In the third case both approaches fail due to quantum fluctuations.
  • The Density of States Functional Fit Approach (DoS FFA) is a recently proposed modern density of states technique suitable for calculations in lattice field theories with a complex action problem. In this article we present an exploratory implementation of DoS FFA for the SU(3) spin system at finite chemical potential $\mu$ - an effective theory for the Polyakov loop. This model has a complex action problem similar to the one of QCD but also allows for a dual simulation in terms of worldlines where the complex action problem is solved. Thus we can compare the DoS FFA results to the reference data from the dual simulation and assess the performance of the new approach. We find that the method reproduces the observables from the dual simulation for a large range of $\mu$ values, including also phase transitions, illustrating that DoS FFA is an interesting approach for exploring phase diagrams of lattice field theories with a complex action problem.
  • The description of electroweak physics using perturbation theory is highly successful. Though not obvious, this is due to a subtle field-theoretical effect, the Fr\"ohlich-Morchio-Strocchi mechanism, which links the physical spectrum to that of the elementary particles. This works because of the special structure of the standard model, and it is not a priori clear whether it works for structurally different theories. Candidates for conflicts are, e.g., grand unified theories. We study this situation in a toy model, a $SU(3)$ gauge theory with two Higgs fields and a breaking pattern $SU(3) \rightarrow SU(2) \rightarrow 1$. This mimics the weak-Higgs sector of the standard model. We determine the leading order predictions for the gauge invariant spectrum in this theory, and discuss a setup to test them using lattice gauge theory.
  • We discuss a variant of density of states (DoS) techniques for lattice field theories, the so-called "functional fit approach" (FFA). The DoS FFA is based on a density of states rho(x) which is parameterized on small intervals of the argument x of rho(x). On these intervals restricted Monte Carlo simulations with an additional Boltzmann factor exp(lambda x) allow to determine rho(x) very precisely by obtaining its parameters from fitting the Monte Carlo data to a known function of lambda. We describe the method in detail and show its applicability in four different systems, three of which have a complex action problem: The SU(3) spin model with a chemical potential, U(1) lattice gauge theory, the Z(3) spin model with chemical potential, and 2-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory with a topological term. In all cases we compare to reference calculations, which partly were done in a dual formulation where the complex action problem is absent. In all four cases we find a very encouraging performance of the DoS FFA.
  • We apply the density of states approach to the Z(3) spin model with a chemical potential mu. For determining the density of states we use restricted Monte Carlo simulations on small intervals of the variable for the density. In each interval we probe the response of the system to the variation of a free parameter in the Boltzmann factor. This response is a known function which we fit to the Monte Carlo data and the parameters of the density are obtained from that fit (functional fit approch; FFA). We evaluate observables related to the particle number and the particle number susceptibility, as well as the free energy. We find that for a surprisingly large range of mu the results from the FFA agree very well with the results from a reference simulation in the dual formulation of the Z(3) spin model which is free of the complex action problem.
  • In this contribution we apply a new variant of the density of states method to the Z3 spin model at finite density. We use restricted expectation values evaluated with Monte Carlo simulations and study their dependence on a control parameter lambda. We show that a sequence of one-parameter fits to the Monte-Carlo data as a function of lambda is sufficient to completely determine the density of states. We expect that this method has smaller statistical errors than other approaches since all generated Monte Carlo data are used in the determination of the density. We compare results for magnetization and susceptibility to a reference simulation in the dual representation of the Z3 spin model and find good agreement for a wide range of parameters.