• We study the 2-ary constraint satisfaction problems (2-CSPs), which can be stated as follows: given a constraint graph $G=(V,E)$, an alphabet set $\Sigma$ and, for each $\{u, v\}\in E$, a constraint $C_{uv} \subseteq \Sigma\times\Sigma$, the goal is to find an assignment $\sigma: V \to \Sigma$ that satisfies as many constraints as possible, where a constraint $C_{uv}$ is satisfied if $(\sigma(u),\sigma(v))\in C_{uv}$. While the approximability of 2-CSPs is quite well understood when $|\Sigma|$ is constant, many problems are still open when $|\Sigma|$ becomes super constant. One such problem is whether it is hard to approximate 2-CSPs to within a polynomial factor of $|\Sigma| |V|$. Bellare et al. (1993) suggested that the answer to this question might be positive. Alas, despite efforts to resolve this conjecture, it remains open to this day. In this work, we separate $|V|$ and $|\Sigma|$ and ask a related but weaker question: is it hard to approximate 2-CSPs to within a polynomial factor of $|V|$ (while $|\Sigma|$ may be super-polynomial in $|V|$)? Assuming the exponential time hypothesis (ETH), we answer this question positively by showing that no polynomial time algorithm can approximate 2-CSPs to within a factor of $|V|^{1 - o(1)}$. Note that our ratio is almost linear, which is almost optimal as a trivial algorithm gives a $|V|$-approximation for 2-CSPs. Thanks to a known reduction, our result implies an ETH-hardness of approximating Directed Steiner Network with ratio $k^{1/4 - o(1)}$ where $k$ is the number of demand pairs. The ratio is roughly the square root of the best known ratio achieved by polynomial time algorithms (Chekuri et al., 2011; Feldman et al., 2012). Additionally, under Gap-ETH, our reduction for 2-CSPs not only rules out polynomial time algorithms, but also FPT algorithms parameterized by $|V|$. Similar statement applies for DSN parameterized by $k$.
  • The log-density method is a powerful algorithmic framework which in recent years has given rise to the best-known approximations for a variety of problems, including Densest-$k$-Subgraph and Bipartite Small Set Vertex Expansion. These approximations have been conjectured to be optimal based on various instantiations of a general conjecture: that it is hard to distinguish a fully random combinatorial structure from one which contains a similar planted sub-structure with the same "log-density". We bolster this conjecture by showing that in a random hypergraph with edge probability $n^{-\alpha}$, $\tilde\Omega(\log n)$ rounds of Sherali-Adams with cannot rule out the existence of a $k$-subhypergraph with edge density $k^{-\alpha-o(1)}$, for any $k$ and $\alpha$. This holds even when the bound on the objective function is lifted. This gives strong integrality gaps which exactly match the gap in the above distinguishing problems, as well as the best-known approximations, for Densest $k$-Subgraph, Smallest $p$-Edge Subgraph, their hypergraph extensions, and Small Set Bipartite Vertex Expansion (or equivalently, Minimum $p$-Union). Previously, such integrality gaps were known only for Densest $k$-Subgraph for one specific parameter setting.
  • We study the parameterized complexity of approximating the $k$-Dominating Set (DomSet) problem where an integer $k$ and a graph $G$ on $n$ vertices are given as input, and the goal is to find a dominating set of size at most $F(k) \cdot k$ whenever the graph $G$ has a dominating set of size $k$. When such an algorithm runs in time $T(k) \cdot poly(n)$ (i.e., FPT-time) for some computable function $T$, it is said to be an $F(k)$-FPT-approximation algorithm for $k$-DomSet. We prove the following for every computable functions $T, F$ and every constant $\varepsilon > 0$: $\bullet$ Assuming $W[1]\neq FPT$, there is no $F(k)$-FPT-approximation algorithm for $k$-DomSet. $\bullet$ Assuming the Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH), there is no $F(k)$-approximation algorithm for $k$-DomSet that runs in $T(k) \cdot n^{o(k)}$ time. $\bullet$ Assuming the Strong Exponential Time Hypothesis (SETH), for every integer $k \geq 2$, there is no $F(k)$-approximation algorithm for $k$-DomSet that runs in $T(k) \cdot n^{k - \varepsilon}$ time. $\bullet$ Assuming the $k$-Sum Hypothesis, for every integer $k \geq 3$, there is no $F(k)$-approximation algorithm for $k$-DomSet that runs in $T(k) \cdot n^{\lceil k/2 \rceil - \varepsilon}$ time. Our results are obtained by establishing a connection between communication complexity and hardness of approximation, generalizing the ideas from a recent breakthrough work of Abboud et al. [FOCS 2017]. Specifically, we show that to prove hardness of approximation of a certain parameterized variant of the label cover problem, it suffices to devise a specific protocol for a communication problem that depends on which hypothesis we rely on. Each of these communication problems turns out to be either a well studied problem or a variant of one; this allows us to easily apply known techniques to solve them.
  • We study the problem of deleting the smallest set $S$ of vertices (resp.\ edges) from a given graph $G$ such that the induced subgraph (resp.\ subgraph) $G \setminus S$ belongs to some class $\mathcal{H}$. We consider the case where graphs in $\mathcal{H}$ have treewidth bounded by $t$, and give a general framework to obtain approximation algorithms for both vertex and edge-deletion settings from approximation algorithms for certain natural graph partitioning problems called $k$-Subset Vertex Separator and $k$-Subset Edge Separator, respectively. For the vertex deletion setting, our framework combined with the current best result for $k$-Subset Vertex Separator, yields a significant improvement in the approximation ratios for basic problems such as $k$-Treewidth Vertex Deletion and Planar-$F$ Vertex Deletion. Our algorithms are simpler than previous works and give the first uniform approximation algorithms under the natural parameterization. For the edge deletion setting, we give improved approximation algorithms for $k$-Subset Edge Separator combining ideas from LP relaxations and important separators. We present their applications in bounded-degree graphs, and also give an APX-hardness result for the edge deletion problems.
  • The $k$-Even Set problem is a parameterized variant of the Minimum Distance Problem of linear codes over $\mathbb F_2$, which can be stated as follows: given a generator matrix $\mathbf A$ and an integer $k$, determine whether the code generated by $\mathbf A$ has distance at most $k$. Here, $k$ is the parameter of the problem. The question of whether $k$-Even Set is fixed parameter tractable (FPT) has been repeatedly raised in literature and has earned its place in Downey and Fellows' book (2013) as one of the "most infamous" open problems in the field of Parameterized Complexity. In this work, we show that $k$-Even Set does not admit FPT algorithms under the (randomized) Gap Exponential Time Hypothesis (Gap-ETH) [Dinur'16, Manurangsi-Raghavendra'16]. In fact, our result rules out not only exact FPT algorithms, but also any constant factor FPT approximation algorithms for the problem. Furthermore, our result holds even under the following weaker assumption, which is also known as the Parameterized Inapproximability Hypothesis (PIH) [Lokshtanov et al.'17]: no (randomized) FPT algorithm can distinguish a satisfiable 2CSP instance from one which is only $0.99$-satisfiable (where the parameter is the number of variables). We also consider the parameterized $k$-Shortest Vector Problem (SVP), in which we are given a lattice whose basis vectors are integral and an integer $k$, and the goal is to determine whether the norm of the shortest vector (in the $\ell_p$ norm for some fixed $p$) is at most $k$. Similar to $k$-Even Set, this problem is also a long-standing open problem in the field of Parameterized Complexity. We show that, for any $p > 1$, $k$-SVP is hard to approximate (in FPT time) to some constant factor, assuming PIH. Furthermore, for the case of $p = 2$, the inapproximability factor can be amplified to any constant.
  • The Directed Steiner Network (DSN) problem takes as input a directed edge-weighted graph $G=(V,E)$ and a set $\mathcal{D}\subseteq V\times V$ of $k$ demand pairs. The aim is to compute the cheapest network $N\subseteq G$ for which there is an $s\to t$ path for each $(s,t)\in\mathcal{D}$. It is known that this problem is notoriously hard as there is no $k^{1/4-o(1)}$-approximation algorithm under Gap-ETH, even when parametrizing the runtime by $k$ [Dinur & Manurangsi, ITCS 2018]. In light of this, we systematically study several special cases of DSN and determine their parameterized approximability for the parameter $k$. For the bi-DSN$_\text{Planar}$ problem, the aim is to compute a planar optimum solution $N\subseteq G$ in a bidirected graph $G$, i.e., for every edge $uv$ of $G$ the reverse edge $vu$ exists and has the same weight. This problem is a generalization of several well-studied special cases. Our main result is that this problem admits a parameterized approximation scheme (PAS) for $k$. We also prove that our result is tight in the sense that (a) the runtime of our PAS cannot be significantly improved, and (b) it is unlikely that a PAS exists for any generalization of bi-DSN$_\text{Planar}$, unless FPT=W[1]. One important special case of DSN is the Strongly Connected Steiner Subgraph (SCSS) problem, for which the solution network $N\subseteq G$ needs to strongly connect a given set of $k$ terminals. It has been observed before that for SCSS a parameterized $2$-approximation exists when parameterized by $k$ [Chitnis et al., IPEC 2013]. We give a tight inapproximability result by showing that for $k$ no parameterized $(2-\varepsilon)$-approximation algorithm exists under Gap-ETH. Additionally we show that when restricting the input of SCSS to bidirected graphs, the problem remains NP-hard but becomes FPT for $k$.
  • Consider the following asynchronous, opportunistic communication model over a graph $G$: in each round, one edge is activated uniformly and independently at random and (only) its two endpoints can exchange messages and perform local computations. Under this model, we study the following random process: The first time a vertex is an endpoint of an active edge, it chooses a random number, say $\pm 1$ with probability $1/2$; then, in each round, the two endpoints of the currently active edge update their values to their average. We show that, if $G$ exhibits a two-community structure (for example, two expanders connected by a sparse cut), the values held by the nodes will collectively reflect the underlying community structure over a suitable phase of the above process, allowing efficient and effective recovery in important cases. In more detail, we first provide a first-moment analysis showing that, for a large class of almost-regular clustered graphs that includes the stochastic block model, the expected values held by all but a negligible fraction of the nodes eventually reflect the underlying cut signal. We prove this property emerges after a mixing period of length $\mathcal O(n\log n)$. We further provide a second-moment analysis for a more restricted class of regular clustered graphs that includes the regular stochastic block model. For this case, we are able to show that most nodes can efficiently and locally identify their community of reference over a suitable time window. This results in the first opportunistic protocols that approximately recover community structure using only polylogarithmic work per node. Even for the above class of regular graphs, our second moment analysis requires new concentration bounds on the product of certain random matrices that are technically challenging and possibly of independent interest.
  • We study the problem of finding a small subset of items that is \emph{agreeable} to all agents, meaning that all agents value the subset at least as much as its complement. Previous work has shown worst-case bounds, over all instances with a given number of agents and items, on the number of items that may need to be included in such a subset. Our goal in this paper is to efficiently compute an agreeable subset whose size approximates the size of the smallest agreeable subset for a given instance. We consider three well-known models for representing the preferences of the agents: ordinal preferences on single items, the value oracle model, and additive utilities. In each of these models, we establish virtually tight bounds on the approximation ratio that can be obtained by algorithms running in polynomial time.
  • We consider questions that arise from the intersection between the areas of polynomial-time approximation algorithms, subexponential-time algorithms, and fixed-parameter tractable algorithms. The questions, which have been asked several times (e.g., [Marx08, FGMS12, DF13]), are whether there is a non-trivial FPT-approximation algorithm for the Maximum Clique (Clique) and Minimum Dominating Set (DomSet) problems parameterized by the size of the optimal solution. In particular, letting $\text{OPT}$ be the optimum and $N$ be the size of the input, is there an algorithm that runs in $t(\text{OPT})\text{poly}(N)$ time and outputs a solution of size $f(\text{OPT})$, for any functions $t$ and $f$ that are independent of $N$ (for Clique, we want $f(\text{OPT})=\omega(1)$)? In this paper, we show that both Clique and DomSet admit no non-trivial FPT-approximation algorithm, i.e., there is no $o(\text{OPT})$-FPT-approximation algorithm for Clique and no $f(\text{OPT})$-FPT-approximation algorithm for DomSet, for any function $f$ (e.g., this holds even if $f$ is the Ackermann function). In fact, our results imply something even stronger: The best way to solve Clique and DomSet, even approximately, is to essentially enumerate all possibilities. Our results hold under the Gap Exponential Time Hypothesis (Gap-ETH) [Dinur16, MR16], which states that no $2^{o(n)}$-time algorithm can distinguish between a satisfiable 3SAT formula and one which is not even $(1 - \epsilon)$-satisfiable for some constant $\epsilon > 0$. Besides Clique and DomSet, we also rule out non-trivial FPT-approximation for Maximum Balanced Biclique, Maximum Subgraphs with Hereditary Properties, and Maximum Induced Matching in bipartite graphs. Additionally, we rule out $k^{o(1)}$-FPT-approximation algorithm for Densest $k$-Subgraph although this ratio does not yet match the trivial $O(k)$-approximation algorithm.
  • The problem of dividing resources fairly occurs in many practical situations and is therefore an important topic of study in economics. In this paper, we investigate envy-free divisions in the setting where there are multiple players in each interested party. While all players in a party share the same set of resources, each player has her own preferences. Under additive valuations drawn randomly from probability distributions, we show that when all groups contain an equal number of players, a welfare-maximizing allocation is likely to be envy-free if the number of items exceeds the total number of players by a logarithmic factor. On the other hand, an envy-free allocation is unlikely to exist if the number of items is less than the total number of players. In addition, we show that a simple truthful mechanism, namely the random assignment mechanism, yields an allocation that satisfies the weaker notion of approximate envy-freeness with high probability.
  • We study the complexity of computing the VC Dimension and Littlestone's Dimension. Given an explicit description of a finite universe and a concept class (a binary matrix whose $(x,C)$-th entry is $1$ iff element $x$ belongs to concept $C$), both can be computed exactly in quasi-polynomial time ($n^{O(\log n)}$). Assuming the randomized Exponential Time Hypothesis (ETH), we prove nearly matching lower bounds on the running time, that hold even for approximation algorithms.
  • The Small Set Expansion Hypothesis (SSEH) is a conjecture which roughly states that it is NP-hard to distinguish between a graph with a small subset of vertices whose edge expansion is almost zero and one in which all small subsets of vertices have expansion almost one. In this work, we prove inapproximability results for the following graph problems based on this hypothesis: - Maximum Edge Biclique (MEB): given a bipartite graph $G$, find a complete bipartite subgraph of $G$ with maximum number of edges. - Maximum Balanced Biclique (MBB): given a bipartite graph $G$, find a balanced complete bipartite subgraph of $G$ with maximum number of vertices. - Minimum $k$-Cut: given a weighted graph $G$, find a set of edges with minimum total weight whose removal partitions $G$ into $k$ connected components. - Densest At-Least-$k$-Subgraph (DAL$k$S): given a weighted graph $G$, find a set $S$ of at least $k$ vertices such that the induced subgraph on $S$ has maximum density (the ratio between the total weight of edges and the number of vertices). We show that, assuming SSEH and NP $\nsubseteq$ BPP, no polynomial time algorithm gives $n^{1 - \varepsilon}$-approximation for MEB or MBB for every constant $\varepsilon > 0$. Moreover, assuming SSEH, we show that it is NP-hard to approximate Minimum $k$-Cut and DAL$k$S to within $(2 - \varepsilon)$ factor of the optimum for every constant $\varepsilon > 0$. The ratios in our results are essentially tight since trivial algorithms give $n$-approximation to both MEB and MBB and efficient $2$-approximation algorithms are known for Minimum $k$-Cut [SV95] and DAL$k$S [And07, KS09]. Our first result is proved by combining a technique developed by Raghavendra et al. [RST12] to avoid locality of gadget reductions with a generalization of Bansal and Khot's long code test [BK09] whereas our second result is shown via elementary reductions.
  • In the Densest $k$-Subgraph problem, given an undirected graph $G$ and an integer $k$, the goal is to find a subgraph of $G$ on $k$ vertices that contains maximum number of edges. Even though the state-of-the-art algorithm for the problem achieves only $O(n^{1/4 + \varepsilon})$ approximation ratio (Bhaskara et al., 2010), previous attempts at proving hardness of approximation, including those under average case assumptions, fail to achieve a polynomial ratio; the best ratios ruled out under any worst case assumption and any average case assumption are only any constant (Raghavendra and Steurer, 2010) and $2^{\Omega(\log^{2/3} n)}$ (Alon et al., 2011) respectively. In this work, we show, assuming the exponential time hypothesis (ETH), that there is no polynomial-time algorithm that approximates Densest $k$-Subgraph to within $n^{1/(\log \log n)^c}$ factor of the optimum, where $c > 0$ is a universal constant independent of $n$. In addition, our result has "perfect completeness", meaning that we prove that it is ETH-hard to even distinguish between the case in which $G$ contains a $k$-clique and the case in which every induced $k$-subgraph of $G$ has density at most $1/n^{-1/(\log \log n)^c}$ in polynomial time. Moreover, if we make a stronger assumption that there is some constant $\varepsilon > 0$ such that no subexponential-time algorithm can distinguish between a satisfiable 3SAT formula and one which is only $(1 - \varepsilon)$-satisfiable (also known as Gap-ETH), then the ratio above can be improved to $n^{f(n)}$ for any function $f$ whose limit is zero as $n$ goes to infinity (i.e. $f \in o(1)$).
  • We prove the computational intractability of rotating and placing $n$ square tiles into a $1 \times n$ array such that adjacent tiles are compatible--either equal edge colors, as in edge-matching puzzles, or matching tab/pocket shapes, as in jigsaw puzzles. Beyond basic NP-hardness, we prove that it is NP-hard even to approximately maximize the number of placed tiles (allowing blanks), while satisfying the compatibility constraint between nonblank tiles, within a factor of 0.9999999851. (On the other hand, there is an easy $1 \over 2$-approximation.) This is the first (correct) proof of inapproximability for edge-matching and jigsaw puzzles. Along the way, we prove NP-hardness of distinguishing, for a directed graph on $n$ nodes, between having a Hamiltonian path (length $n-1$) and having at most $0.999999284 (n-1)$ edges that form a vertex-disjoint union of paths. We use this gap hardness and gap-preserving reductions to establish similar gap hardness for $1 \times n$ jigsaw and edge-matching puzzles.
  • We construct an improved integrality gap instance for the Calinescu-Karloff-Rabani LP relaxation of the Multiway Cut problem. In particular, for $k \geqslant 3$ terminals, our instance has an integrality ratio of $6 / (5 + \frac{1}{k - 1}) - \varepsilon$, for every constant $\varepsilon > 0$. For every $k \geqslant 4$, our result improves upon a long-standing lower bound of $8 / (7 + \frac{1}{k - 1})$ by Freund and Karloff (2000). Due to Manokaran et al.'s result (2008), our integrality gap also implies Unique Games hardness of approximating Multiway Cut of the same ratio.
  • A $(k \times l)$-birthday repetition $\mathcal{G}^{k \times l}$ of a two-prover game $\mathcal{G}$ is a game in which the two provers are sent random sets of questions from $\mathcal{G}$ of sizes $k$ and $l$ respectively. These two sets are sampled independently uniformly among all sets of questions of those particular sizes. We prove the following birthday repetition theorem: when $\mathcal{G}$ satisfies some mild conditions, $val(\mathcal{G}^{k \times l})$ decreases exponentially in $\Omega(kl/n)$ where $n$ is the total number of questions. Our result positively resolves an open question posted by Aaronson, Impagliazzo and Moshkovitz (CCC 2014). As an application of our birthday repetition theorem, we obtain new fine-grained hardness of approximation results for dense CSPs. Specifically, we establish a tight trade-off between running time and approximation ratio for dense CSPs by showing conditional lower bounds, integrality gaps and approximation algorithms. In particular, for any sufficiently large $i$ and for every $k \geq 2$, we show the following results: - We exhibit an $O(q^{1/i})$-approximation algorithm for dense Max $k$-CSPs with alphabet size $q$ via $O_k(i)$-level of Sherali-Adams relaxation. - Through our birthday repetition theorem, we obtain an integrality gap of $q^{1/i}$ for $\tilde\Omega_k(i)$-level Lasserre relaxation for fully-dense Max $k$-CSP. - Assuming that there is a constant $\epsilon > 0$ such that Max 3SAT cannot be approximated to within $(1-\epsilon)$ of the optimal in sub-exponential time, our birthday repetition theorem implies that any algorithm that approximates fully-dense Max $k$-CSP to within a $q^{1/i}$ factor takes $(nq)^{\tilde \Omega_k(i)}$ time, almost tightly matching the algorithmic result based on Sherali-Adams relaxation.
  • We prove that it is NP-hard to dissect one simple orthogonal polygon into another using a given number of pieces, as is approximating the fewest pieces to within a factor of $1+1/1080-\varepsilon$.
  • In this paper, we prove an almost-optimal hardness for Max $k$-CSP$_R$ based on Khot's Unique Games Conjecture (UGC). In Max $k$-CSP$_R$, we are given a set of predicates each of which depends on exactly $k$ variables. Each variable can take any value from $1, 2, \dots, R$. The goal is to find an assignment to variables that maximizes the number of satisfied predicates. Assuming the Unique Games Conjecture, we show that it is NP-hard to approximate Max $k$-CSP$_R$ to within factor $2^{O(k \log k)}(\log R)^{k/2}/R^{k - 1}$ for any $k, R$. To the best of our knowledge, this result improves on all the known hardness of approximation results when $3 \leq k = o(\log R/\log \log R)$. In this case, the previous best hardness result was NP-hardness of approximating within a factor $O(k/R^{k-2})$ by Chan. When $k = 2$, our result matches the best known UGC-hardness result of Khot, Kindler, Mossel and O'Donnell. In addition, by extending an algorithm for Max 2-CSP$_R$ by Kindler, Kolla and Trevisan, we provide an $\Omega(\log R/R^{k - 1})$-approximation algorithm for Max $k$-CSP$_R$. This algorithm implies that our inapproximability result is tight up to a factor of $2^{O(k \log k)}(\log R)^{k/2 - 1}$. In comparison, when $3 \leq k$ is a constant, the previously known gap was $O(R)$, which is significantly larger than our gap of $O(\text{polylog } R)$. Finally, we show that we can replace the Unique Games Conjecture assumption with Khot's $d$-to-1 Conjecture and still get asymptotically the same hardness of approximation.
  • The projection games (aka Label-Cover) problem is of great importance to the field of approximation algorithms, since most of the NP-hardness of approximation results we know today are reductions from Label-Cover. In this paper we design several approximation algorithms for projection games: 1. A polynomial-time approximation algorithm that improves on the previous best approximation by Charikar, Hajiaghayi and Karloff. 2. A sub-exponential time algorithm with much tighter approximation for the case of smooth projection games. 3. A polynomial-time approximation scheme (PTAS) for projection games on planar graphs and a tight running time lower bound for such approximation schemes.
  • In this paper, we present a polynomial-time algorithm that approximates sufficiently high-value Max 2-CSPs on sufficiently dense graphs to within $O(N^{\varepsilon})$ approximation ratio for any constant $\varepsilon > 0$. Using this algorithm, we also achieve similar results for free games, projection games on sufficiently dense random graphs, and the Densest $k$-Subgraph problem with sufficiently dense optimal solution. Note, however, that algorithms with similar guarantees to the last algorithm were in fact discovered prior to our work by Feige et al. and Suzuki and Tokuyama. In addition, our idea for the above algorithms yields the following by-product: a quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme (QPTAS) for satisfiable dense Max 2-CSPs with better running time than the known algorithms.