• We have searched for continuous gravitational wave (CGW) signals produced by individually resolvable, circular supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) in the latest EPTA dataset, which consists of ultra-precise timing data on 41 millisecond pulsars. We develop frequentist and Bayesian detection algorithms to search both for monochromatic and frequency-evolving systems. None of the adopted algorithms show evidence for the presence of such a CGW signal, indicating that the data are best described by pulsar and radiometer noise only. Depending on the adopted detection algorithm, the 95\% upper limit on the sky-averaged strain amplitude lies in the range $6\times 10^{-15}<A<1.5\times10^{-14}$ at $5{\rm nHz}<f<7{\rm nHz}$. This limit varies by a factor of five, depending on the assumed source position, and the most constraining limit is achieved towards the positions of the most sensitive pulsars in the timing array. The most robust upper limit -- obtained via a full Bayesian analysis searching simultaneously over the signal and pulsar noise on the subset of ours six best pulsars -- is $A\approx10^{-14}$. These limits, the most stringent to date at $f<10{\rm nHz}$, exclude the presence of sub-centiparsec binaries with chirp mass $\cal{M}_c>10^9$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 25Mpc, and with $\cal{M}_c>10^{10}$M$_\odot$ out to a distance of about 1Gpc ($z\approx0.2$). We show that state-of-the-art SMBHB population models predict $<1\%$ probability of detecting a CGW with the current EPTA dataset, consistent with the reported non-detection. We stress, however, that PTA limits on individual CGW have improved by almost an order of magnitude in the last five years. The continuing advances in pulsar timing data acquisition and analysis techniques will allow for strong astrophysical constraints on the population of nearby SMBHBs in the coming years.
  • We present new limits on an isotropic stochastic gravitational-wave background (GWB) using a six pulsar dataset spanning 18 yr of observations from the 2015 European Pulsar Timing Array data release. Performing a Bayesian analysis, we fit simultaneously for the intrinsic noise parameters for each pulsar, along with common correlated signals including clock, and Solar System ephemeris errors, obtaining a robust 95$\%$ upper limit on the dimensionless strain amplitude $A$ of the background of $A<3.0\times 10^{-15}$ at a reference frequency of $1\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ and a spectral index of $13/3$, corresponding to a background from inspiralling super-massive black hole binaries, constraining the GW energy density to $\Omega_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2 < 1.1\times10^{-9}$ at 2.8 nHz. We also present limits on the correlated power spectrum at a series of discrete frequencies, and show that our sensitivity to a fiducial isotropic GWB is highest at a frequency of $\sim 5\times10^{-9}$~Hz. Finally we discuss the implications of our analysis for the astrophysics of supermassive black hole binaries, and present 95$\%$ upper limits on the string tension, $G\mu/c^2$, characterising a background produced by a cosmic string network for a set of possible scenarios, and for a stochastic relic GWB. For a Nambu-Goto field theory cosmic string network, we set a limit $G\mu/c^2<1.3\times10^{-7}$, identical to that set by the {\it Planck} Collaboration, when combining {\it Planck} and high-$\ell$ Cosmic Microwave Background data from other experiments. For a stochastic relic background we set a limit of $\Omega^\mathrm{relic}_\mathrm{gw}(f)h^2<1.2 \times10^{-9}$, a factor of 9 improvement over the most stringent limits previously set by a pulsar timing array.
  • Supermassive Binary Black Holes (SMBBHs) with sub-pc separations form in the course of galaxy mergers, if both galaxies harbour massive black holes. Clear observational evidence for them however still eludes us. We propose a novel method of identifying these systems by means of reverberation mapping their circumbinary disk after a tidal disruption event has ionized it. The tidal disruption of a star at the secondary leads to strong asymmetries in the disk response. We model the shape of the velocity--delay maps for various toy disk models and more realistic gas distributions obtained by SPH simulations. The emissivity of the ionized disk is calculated with {\em Cloudy}. We find peculiar asymmetries in the maps for off center ionizing sources that may help us constrain geometrical parameters of a circumbinary disk such as semi-major axis and orbital phase of the secondary, as well as help strengthen the observational evidence for sub-parsec SMBBHs as such.
  • Dense stellar systems such as globular clusters and dense nuclear clusters are the breeding ground of sources of gravitational waves for the advanced detectors LIGO and Virgo. These systems deserve a close study to estimate rates and parameter distribution. This is not an easy task, since the evolution of a dense stellar cluster involves the integration of $N$ bodies with high resolution in time and space and including hard binaries and their encounters and, in the case of gravitational waves (GWs), one needs to take into account important relativistic corrections. In this work we present the first implementation of the effect of spin in mergers in a direct-summation code, NBODY6. We employ non-spinning post-Newtonian corrections to the Newtonian accelerations up to 3.5 post-Newtonian (PN) order as well as the spin-orbit coupling up to next-to-lowest order and the lowest order spin-spin coupling. We integrate spin precession and add a consistent treatment of mergers. We analyse the implementation by running a set of two-body experiments and then we run a set of 500 simulations of a relativistic stellar cluster. In spite of the large number of mergers in our tests, the application of the algorithm is robust. We find in particular the formation of a runaway star whose spin decays with the mass it wins, independently of the initial value of the spins of the stars. More remarkably, the subset of compact objects that do not undergo many mergers, and hence represent a more realistic system, has a correlation between the final absolute spin and the initial choice for the initial distribution, which could provide us with information about the evolution of spins in dense clusters once the first detections have started.
  • Hubble Space Telescope observations of globular clusters (GCs) in the Antennae galaxy show clusters of clusters, or regions in the galaxy that span hundreds of parsecs, where many of the GCs are doomed to collide, and eventually merge. Several such objects appear likely to present a significant range in ages, hence possibly metallicities, and their merger could plausibly lead to multi-metallic GCs. Here we explore this process with direct-summation N-body simulations with GPU hardware. Our results reveal that colliding GCs with different metallicities and ages can produce a GC with multiplicity and occupation fractions not unlike those observed in multi-metallic clusters. In our simulations, the merged clusters have a phase with a larger amount of flattening than average, as a consequence of rapid rotation- thus suggesting that relatively recent mergers may play a role in producing highly flattened, multi-metallic clusters. We additionally explore the role of the King parameter of the cluster in the occupation fractions with a set of 160 direct-summation simulations and find that for equal size clusters the King parameter of the progenitor clusters determines the occupation fractions in the merger product, while in unequal size mergers the size of the clusters dominates the distribution of stars in the new GC. In particular, we find that the observed distribution of populations in Omega Cen can be described to some extent with our dynamical models.
  • In our current interpretation of the hierarchical structure of the universe it is well established that galaxies collide and merge with each other during their lifetime. If massive black holes (MBHs) reside in galactic centres, we expect them to form binaries in galactic nuclei surrounded by a circumbinary disc. If cooling is efficient enough, the gas in the disc will clump and trigger stellar formation in situ. In this first paper we address the evolution of the binary under the influence of the newly formed stars, which form individually and also clustered. We use SPH techniques to evolve the gas in the circumbinary disc and to study the phase of star formation. When the amount of gas in the disc is negligible, we further evolve the system with a high-accurate direct-summation $N-$body code to follow the evolution of the stars, the innermost binary and tidal disruption events (TDEs). For this, we modify the direct N-body code to (i) include treatment of TDEs and to (ii) include "gas cloud particles" that mimic the gas, so that the stellar clusters do not disolve when we follow their infall on to the MBHs. We find that the amount of stars disrupted by either infalling stellar clusters or individual stars is as large as 10^{-4}/yr per binary, higher than expected for typical galaxies.
  • The capture of a compact object in a galactic nucleus by a massive black hole (MBH), an extreme-mass ratio inspiral (EMRI), is the best way to map space and time around it. Recent work on stellar dynamics has demonstrated that there seems to be a complot in phase space acting on low-eccentricity captures, since their rates decrease significantly by the presence of a blockade in the rate at which orbital angular momenta change takes place. This so-called "Schwarzschild barrier" is a result of the impact of relativistic precession on to the stellar potential torques, and thus it affects the enhancement on lower-eccentricity EMRIs that one would expect from resonant relaxation. We confirm and quantify the existence of this barrier using a statistical sample of 2,500 direct-summation N-body simulations using both a post-Newtonian and also for the first time in a direct-summation code a geodesic approximation for the relativistic orbits. The existence of the barrier prevents low-eccentricity EMRIs from approaching the central MBH, but high-eccentricity EMRIs, which have been wrongly classified as "direct plunges" until recently, ignore the presence of the barrier, because they are driven by two-body relaxation. Hence, since the rates are significantly affected in the case of low-eccentricity EMRIs, we predict that a LISA-like observatory such as eLISA will predominantly detect high-eccentricity EMRIs.
  • The capture of a compact object in a galactic nucleus by a massive black hole (MBH) is the best way to map space and time around it. Compact objects such as stellar black holes on a capture orbit with a very high eccentricity have been wrongly assumed to be lost for the system after an intense burst of radiation, which has been described as a "direct plunge". We prove that these very eccentric capture orbits spend actually a similar number of cycles in a LISA-like detector as those with lower eccentricities if the central MBH is spinning. Although the rates are higher for high-eccentricity EMRIs, the spin also enhances the rates of lower-eccentricity EMRIs. This last kind have received more attention because of the fact that high-eccentricity EMRIs were thought to be direct plunges and thus negligible. On the other hand, recent work on stellar dynamics has demonstrated that there seems to be a complot in phase space acting on these lower-eccentricity captures, since their rates decrease significantly by the presence of a blockade in the rate at which orbital angular momenta change takes place. This so-called "Schwarzschild barrier" is a result of the impact of relativistic precession on to the stellar potential torques, and thus it affects the enhancement on lower-eccentricity EMRIs that one would expect from resonant relaxation. We confirm and quantify the existence of this barrier using a statitical sample of 2,500 direct-summation N-body simulations using both a post-Newtonian but also, and for the first time, a geodesic approximation for the relativistic orbits. The existence of the barrier prevents "traditional EMRIs" from approaching the central MBH, but if the central MBH is spinning the rate will be anyway dominated by highly-eccentric extreme-mass ratio inspirals, which insolently ignore the presence of the barrier, because they are driven by two-body relaxation.
  • Measurements of gravitational waves from the inspiral of a stellar-mass compact object into a massive black hole are unique probes to test General Relativity (GR) and MBH properties, as well as the stellar distribution about these holes in galactic nuclei. Current data analysis techniques can provide us with parameter estimation with very narrow errors. However, an EMRI is not a two-body problem, since other stellar bodies orbiting nearby will influence the capture orbit. Any deviation from the isolated inspiral will induce a small, though observable deviation from the idealised waveform which could be misinterpreted as a failure of GR. Based on conservative analysis of mass segregation in a Milky Way like nucleus, we estimate that the possibility that another star has a semi-major axis comparable to that of the EMRI is non-negligible, although probably very small. This star introduces an observable perturbation in the orbit in the case in which we consider only loss of energy via gravitational radiation. When considering the two first-order non-dissipative post-Newtonian contributions (the periapsis shift of the orbit), the evolution of the orbital elements of the EMRI turns out to be chaotic in nature. The implications of this study are twofold. From the one side, the application to testing GR and measuring MBHs parameters with the detection of EMRIs in galactic nuclei with a millihertz mission will be even more challenging than believed. From the other side, this behaviour could in principle be used as a signature of mass segregation in galactic nuclei.