• We present the results of a systematic search for Lyman-alpha emitters (LAEs) at $6 \lesssim z \lesssim 7.6$ using the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallel (WISP) Survey. Our total volume over this redshift range is $\sim 8 \times10^5$ Mpc$^3$, comparable to many of the narrowband surveys despite their larger area coverage. We find two LAEs at $z=6.38$ and $6.44$ with line luminosities of L$_{\mathrm{Ly}\alpha} \sim 4.7 \times 10^{43}$ erg s$^{-1}$, putting them among the brightest LAEs discovered at these redshifts. Taking advantage of the broad spectral coverage of WISP, we are able to rule out almost all lower-redshift contaminants. The WISP LAEs have a high number density of $7.7\times10^{-6}$ Mpc$^{-3}$. We argue that the LAEs reside in Mpc-scale ionized bubbles that allow the Lyman-alpha photons to redshift out of resonance before encountering the neutral IGM. We discuss possible ionizing sources and conclude that the observed LAEs alone are not sufficient to ionize the bubbles.
  • We present a compilation of UBV RIz light curves of 51 type II supernovae discovered during the course of four different surveys during 1986 to 2003: the Cerro Tololo Supernova Survey, the Calan/Tololo Supernova Program (C&T), the Supernova Optical and Infrared Survey (SOIRS), and the Carnegie Type II Supernova Survey (CATS). The photometry is based on template-subtracted images to eliminate any potential host galaxy light contamination, and calibrated from foreground stars. This work presents these photometric data, studies the color evolution using different bands, and explores the relation between the magnitude at maximum brightness and the brightness decline parameter (s) from maximum light through the end of the recombination phase. This parameter is found to be shallower for redder bands and appears to have the best correlation in the B band. In addition, it also correlates with the plateau duration, being thus shorter (longer) for larger (smaller) s values.
  • We report the first direct and robust measurement of the faint-end slope of the Lyman-alpha emitter (LAE) luminosity function at z = 5.7. Candidate LAEs from a low-spectral-resolution blind search with IMACS on Magellan-Baade were targeted at higher resolution to distinguish high redshift LAEs from foreground galaxies. All but 2 of our 42 single-emission-line systems have flux F $< 2.0 \times 10^{-17}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, making these the faintest emission-lines observed for a z = 5.7 sample with known completeness, an essential property for determining the faint end slope of the LAE luminosity function. We find 13 LAEs as compared to 29 foreground galaxies, in very good agreement with the modeled foreground counts predicted in Dressler et al. (2011a) that had been used to estimate a faint-end slope of $\alpha$ = -2.0 for the LAE luminosity function. A 32% LAE fraction, LAE/(LAE+foreground), within the flux interval F = $2-20 \times 10^{-18}$ ergs s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, constrains the faint end slope of the luminosity function to -2.35 < $\alpha$ < -1.95 (1-$\sigma$). We show how this steep LF should provide, to the limit of our observations, more than 20% of the flux necessary to maintain ionization at z=5.7, with a factor-of-ten extrapolation in flux reaching more than 55%. This is in addition to a comparable contribution from Lyman Break Galaxies M$_{UV} \le$ -18. We suggest that this bodes well for a sufficient supply of Lyman continuum photons by similar, low-mass star forming galaxies within the reionization epoch at z $\approx$ 7, only 250 Myr earlier.
  • Near infrared slitless spectroscopy with the Wide Field Camera 3, onboard the Hubble Space Telescope, offers a unique opportunity to study low-mass galaxy populations at high-redshift ($z\sim$1-2). While most high$-z$ surveys are biased towards massive galaxies, we are able to select sources via their emission lines that have very-faint continua. We investigate the star formation rate (SFR)-stellar mass ($M_{\star}$) relation for about 1000 emission-line galaxies identified over a wide redshift range of $0.3 \lesssim z \lesssim 2.3$. We use the H$_{\alpha}$ emission as an accurate SFR indicator and correct the broadband photometry for the strong nebular contribution to derive accurate stellar masses down to $M_{\star} \sim 10^{7} M_{\odot}$. We focus here on a subsample of galaxies that show extremely strong emission lines (EELGs) with rest-frame equivalent widths ranging from 200 to 1500 \AA. This population consists of outliers to the normal SFR-$M_{\star}$ sequence with much higher specific SFRs ($> 10$ Gyr$^{-1}$). While on-sequence galaxies follow a continuous star formation process, EELGs are thought to be caught during an extreme burst of star formation that can double their stellar mass in less than $100$ Myr. The contribution of starbursts to the total star formation density appears to be larger than what has been reported for more massive galaxies in previous studies. In the complete mass range $8.2 <$ log($M_{\star}/M_{\odot}$) $< 10$ and a SFR lower completeness limit of about 2 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$ (10 $M_{\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$) at $z\sim1$ ($z \sim 2$), we find that starbursts having EW$_{rest}$(H$_{\alpha}$)$>$ 300, 200, and 100 A contribute up to $\sim13$, 18, and 34 %, respectively, to the total SFR of emission-line selected sample at $z\sim1-2$. The comparison with samples of massive galaxies shows an increase in the contribution of starbursts towards lower masses.
  • We present an analysis of the diversity of V-band light-curves of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. Analyzing a sample of 116 supernovae, several magnitude measurements are defined, together with decline rates at different epochs, and time durations of different phases. It is found that magnitudes measured at maximum light correlate more strongly with decline rates than those measured at other epochs: brighter supernovae at maximum generally have faster declining light-curves at all epochs. We find a relation between the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase and peak magnitudes, which has a dispersion of 0.56 magnitudes, offering the prospect of using type II supernovae as purely photometric distance indicators. Our analysis suggests that the type II population spans a continuum from low-luminosity events which have flat light-curves during the 'plateau' stage, through to the brightest events which decline much faster. A large range in optically thick phase durations is observed, implying a range in progenitor envelope masses at the epoch of explosion. During the radioactive tails, we find many supernovae with faster declining light-curves than expected from full trapping of radioactive emission, implying low mass ejecta. It is suggested that the main driver of light-curve diversity is the extent of hydrogen envelopes retained before explosion. Finally, a new classification scheme is introduced where hydrogen-rich events are typed as simply 'SNII' with an s2 value giving the decline rate during the 'plateau' phase, indicating its morphological type.
  • We present a spectroscopic analysis of the H-alpha profiles of hydrogen-rich type II supernovae. A total of 52 type II supernovae having well sampled optical light curves and spectral sequences were analyzed. Concentrating on the H-alpha P-Cygni profile we measure its velocity from the FWHM of emission and the ratio of absorption to emission (a/e) at a common epoch at the start of the recombination phase, and search for correlations between these spectral parameters and photometric properties of the V-band light curves. Testing the strength of various correlations we find that a/e appears to be the dominant spectral parameter in terms of describing the diversity in our measured supernova properties. It is found that supernovae with smaller a/e have higher H-alpha velocities, more rapidly declining light curves from maximum, during the plateau and radioactive tail phase, are brighter at maximum light and have shorter optically thick phase durations. We discuss possible explanations of these results in terms of physical properties of type II supernovae, speculating that the most likely parameters which influence the morphologies of H-alpha profiles are the mass and density profile of the hydrogen envelope, together with additional emission components due to circumstellar interaction.
  • We present results from near-infrared spectroscopy of 26 emission-line galaxies at z ~ 2 obtained with the FIRE spectrometer on the Magellan Baade telescope. The sample was selected from the WISP survey, which uses the near-infrared grism of the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 to detect emission-line galaxies over 0.3 < z < 2.3. Our FIRE follow-up spectroscopy (R~5000) over 1.0-2.5 micron permits detailed measurements of physical properties of the z~2 emission-line galaxies. Dust-corrected star formation rates for the sample range from ~5-100 M_sun yr-1. We derive a median metallicity for the sample of ~0.45 Z_sun, and the estimated stellar masses range from ~10^8.5 - 10^9.5 M_sun. The average ionization parameters measured for the sample are typically much higher than what is found for local star-forming galaxies. We derive composite spectra from the FIRE sample, from which we infer typical nebular electron densities of ~100-400 cm^-3. Based on the location of the galaxies and composite spectra on BPT diagrams, we do not find evidence for significant AGN activity in the sample. Most of the galaxies as well as the composites are offset in the BPT diagram toward higher [O III]/H-beta at a given [N II]/H-alpha, in agreement with other observations of z > 1 star-forming galaxies, but composite spectra derived from the sample do not show an appreciable offset from the local star-forming sequence on the [O III]/H-beta versus [S II]/H-alpha diagram. We infer a high nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio from the composite spectrum, which may contribute to the offset of the high-redshift galaxies from the local star-forming sequence in the [O III]/H-beta versus [N II]/H-alpha diagram. We speculate that the elevated nitrogen abundance could result from substantial numbers of Wolf-Rayet stars in starbursting galaxies at z~2. (Abridged)
  • We present near-infrared emission line counts and luminosity functions from the HST WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) program for 29 fields (0.037 deg^2) observed using both the G102 and G141 grisms. Altogether we identify 1048 emission line galaxies with observed equivalent widths greater than 40 Angstroms, 467 of which have multiple detected emission lines. The WISP survey is sensitive to fainter flux levels (3-5x10^-17 ergs/s/cm^2) than the future space near-infrared grism missions aimed at baryonic acoustic oscillation cosmology (1-4x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2), allowing us to probe the fainter emission line galaxies that the shallower future surveys may miss. Cumulative number counts of 0.7<z<1.5 galaxies reach 10,000 deg^-2 above an H-alpha flux of 2x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2. H-alpha-emitting galaxies with comparable [OIII] flux are roughly 5 times less common than galaxies with just H-alpha emission at those flux levels. Galaxies with low H-alpha/[OIII] ratios are very rare at the brighter fluxes that future near-infrared grism surveys will probe; our survey finds no galaxies with H-alpha/[OIII] < 0.95 that have H-alpha flux greater than 3x10^-16 ergs/s/cm^2. Our H-alpha luminosity function contains a comparable number density of faint line emitters to that found by the NICMOS near-infrared grism surveys, but significantly fewer (factors of 3-4 less) high luminosity emitters. We also find that our high redshift (z=0.9-1.5) counts are in agreement with the high redshift (z=1.47) narrow band H-alpha survey of HiZELS (Sobral et al. 2013), while our lower redshift luminosity function (z=0.3-0.9) falls slightly below their z=0.84 result. The evolution in both the H-alpha luminosity function from z=0.3--1.5 and the [OIII] luminosity function from z=0.7-2.3 is almost entirely in the L* parameter, which steadily increases with redshift over those ranges.
  • We present the first robust measurement of the high redshift mass-metallicity (MZ) relation at 10^{8}< M/M_{\sun} < 10^{10}, obtained by stacking spectra of 83 emission-line galaxies with secure redshifts between 1.3 < z < 2.3. For these redshifts, infrared grism spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 is sensitive to the R23 metallicity diagnostic: ([OII]3726,3729 + [OIII] 4959,5007)/H\beta. Using spectra stacked in four mass quartiles, we find a MZ relation that declines significantly with decreasing mass, extending from 12+log(O/H) = 8.8 at M=10^{9.8} M_{\sun} to 12+log(O/H)= 8.2 at M=10^{8.2} M_{\sun}. After correcting for systematic offsets between metallicity indicators, we compare our MZ relation to measurements from the stacked spectra of galaxies with M>10^{9.5} M_{\sun} and z~2.3. Within the statistical uncertainties, our MZ relation agrees with the z~2.3 result, particularly since our somewhat higher metallicities (by around 0.1 dex) are qualitatively consistent with the lower mean redshift z=1.76 of our sample. For the masses probed by our data, the MZ relation shows a steep slope which is suggestive of feedback from energy-driven winds, and a cosmological downsizing evolution where high mass galaxies reach the local MZ relation at earlier times. In addition, we show that our sample falls on an extrapolation of the star-forming main sequence (the SFR-M_{*} relation) at this redshift. This result indicates that grism emission-line selected samples do not have preferentially high SFRs. Finally, we report no evidence for evolution of the mass-metallicity-SFR plane; our stack-averaged measurements show excellent agreement with the local relation.
  • We present 3D-HST, a near-infrared spectroscopic Treasury program with the Hubble Space Telescope for studying the processes that shape galaxies in the distant Universe. 3D-HST provides rest-frame optical spectra for a sample of ~7000 galaxies at 1<z<3.5, the epoch when 60% of all star formation took place, the number density of quasars peaked, the first galaxies stopped forming stars, and the structural regularity that we see in galaxies today must have emerged. 3D-HST will cover 3/4 (625 sq.arcmin) of the CANDELS survey area with two orbits of primary WFC3/G141 grism coverage and two to four parallel orbits with the ACS/G800L grism. In the IR these exposure times yield a continuum signal-to-noise of ~5 per resolution element at H~23.1 and a 5sigma emission line sensitivity of 5x10-17 erg/s/cm2 for typical objects, improving by a factor of ~2 for compact sources in images with low sky background levels. The WFC3/G141 spectra provide continuous wavelength coverage from 1.1-1.6 um at a spatial resolution of ~0."13, which, combined with their depth, makes them a unique resource for studying galaxy evolution. We present the preliminary reduction and analysis of the grism observations, including emission line and redshift measurements from combined fits to the extracted grism spectra and photometry from ancillary multi-wavelength catalogs. The present analysis yields redshift estimates with a precision of sigma(z)=0.0034(1+z), or sigma(v)~1000 km/s. We illustrate how the generalized nature of the survey yields near-infrared spectra of remarkable quality for many different types of objects, including a quasar at z=4.7, quiescent galaxies at z~2, and the most distant T-type brown dwarf star known. The CANDELS and 3D-HST surveys combined will provide the definitive imaging and spectroscopic dataset for studies of the 1<z<3.5 Universe until the launch of the James Webb Space Telescope.
  • We present the discovery of three late type (>T4) brown dwarfs, including a probable Y dwarf, in the WFC3 Infrared Spectroscopic Parallels (WISP) Survey. We use the G141 grism spectra to determine the spectral types of the dwarfs and derive distance estimates based on a comparison with nearby T dwarfs with known parallaxes. These are the most distant spectroscopically confirmed T/Y dwarfs, with the farthest at an estimated distance of ~400 pc. We compare the number of cold dwarfs found in the WISP survey with simulations of the brown dwarf mass function. The number found is generally consistent with an initial stellar mass function dN/dM \propto M^{-\alpha} with \alpha = 0.0--0.5, although the identification of a Y dwarf is somewhat surprising and may be indicative of either a flatter absolute magnitude/spectral type relation than previously reported or an upturn in the number of very late type brown dwarfs in the observed volume.
  • We present first results from the 3D-HST program, a near-IR spectroscopic survey performed with the Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope. We have used 3D-HST spectra to measure redshifts and Halpha equivalent widths for a stellar mass-limited sample of 34 galaxies at 1<z<1.5 with M(stellar)>10^11 M(sun) in the COSMOS, GOODS, and AEGIS fields. We find that a substantial fraction of massive galaxies at this epoch are forming stars at a high rate: the fraction of galaxies with Halpha equivalent widths >10 A is 59%, compared to 10% among SDSS galaxies of similar masses at z=0.1. Galaxies with weak Halpha emission show absorption lines typical of 2-4 Gyr old stellar populations. The structural parameters of the galaxies, derived from the associated WFC3 F140W imaging data, correlate with the presence of Halpha: quiescent galaxies are compact with high Sersic index and high inferred velocity dispersion, whereas star-forming galaxies are typically large two-armed spiral galaxies, with low Sersic index. Some of these star forming galaxies might be progenitors of the most massive S0 and Sa galaxies. Our results challenge the idea that galaxies at fixed mass form a homogeneous population with small scatter in their properties. Instead we find that massive galaxies form a highly diverse population at z>1, in marked contrast to the local Universe.
  • We report results of a unprecedentedly deep, blind search for Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) at z = 5.7 using IMACS, the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera & Spectrograph, with the goal of identifying missing sources of reionization that could also be basic building blocks for today's L* galaxies. We describe how improvements in wide field imaging with the Baade telescope, upgrades to IMACS, and the accumulation of ~20 hours of integration per field in excellent seeing led to the detection of single-emission-line sources as faint as F ~ 2 x 10^{-18} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2}, a sensitivity 5 times deeper than our first search (Martin et al. 2008). A reasonable correction for foreground interlopers implies a steep rise of approximately an order of magnitude in source density for a factor of four drop in flux, from F = 10^{-17.0} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2} to F = 10^{-17.6} (2.5) x 10^{-18} ergs s^{-1} cm^{-2}. At this flux the putative LAEs have reached a surface density of ~1 per sq arcminute -- a comoving volume density of 4 x 10^{-3} Mpc^{-3}, several times the density of L* galaxies today. Such a population of faint LAEs would account for a significant fraction of the critical flux density required to complete reionization at this epoch, and would be good candidates for building blocks of stellar mass ~10^{8-9} Msun for the young galaxies of this epoch.
  • Cerro Las Campanas located at Las Campanas Observatory (LCO) in Chile has been selected as the site for the Giant Magellan Telescope. We report results obtained since the commencement, in 2005, of a systematic site testing survey of potential GMT sites at LCO. Meteorological (cloud cover, temperature, pressure, wind, and humidity) and DIMM seeing data have been obtained at three potential sites, and are compared with identical data taken at the site of the twin Magellan 6.5m telescopes. In addition, measurements of the turbulence profile of the free-atmosphere above LCO have been collected with a MASS/DIMM. Furthermore, we consider photometric quality, light pollution, and precipitable water vapor (PWV). LCO, and Co. Las Campanas in particular, have dark skies, little or no risk of future light pollution, excellent seeing, moderate winds, PWV adequate for mid-IR astronomy during a reasonable fraction of the nights, and a high fraction of clear nights overall. Finally, Co. Las Campanas meets or exceeds all the defined science requirements.
  • The newly installed Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope has been used to obtain multi-band images of the nearby spiral galaxy M83. These new observations are the deepest and highest resolution images ever taken of a grand-design spiral, particularly in the near ultraviolet, and allow us to better differentiate compact star clusters from individual stars and to measure the luminosities of even faint clusters in the U band. We find that the luminosity function for clusters outside of the very crowded starburst nucleus can be approximated by a power law, dN/dL \propto L^{alpha}, with alpha = -2.04 +/- 0.08, down to M_V ~ -5.5. We test the sensitivity of the luminosity function to different selection techniques, filters, binning, and aperture correction determinations, and find that none of these contribute significantly to uncertainties in alpha. We estimate ages and masses for the clusters by comparing their measured UBVI,Halpha colors with predictions from single stellar population models. The age distribution of the clusters can be approximated by a power-law, dN/dt propto t^{gamma}, with gamma=-0.9 +/- 0.2, for M > few x 10^3 Msun and t < 4x10^8 yr. This indicates that clusters are disrupted quickly, with ~80-90% disrupted each decade in age over this time. The mass function of clusters over the same M-t range is a power law, dN/dM propto M^{beta}, with beta=-1.94 +/- 0.16, and does not have bends or show curvature at either high or low masses. Therefore, we do not find evidence for a physical upper mass limit, M_C, or for the earlier disruption of lower mass clusters when compared with higher mass clusters, i.e. mass-dependent disruption. We briefly discuss these implications for the formation and disruption of the clusters.
  • We present a large sample of candidate galaxies at z~7--10, selected in the HUDF using the new observations made by the HST/WFC3. Our sample is composed of 20 z-dropouts, 15 Y-dropouts, and 20 J-dropouts. The surface densities of the z-dropouts are close to what predicted by earlier studies, however, those of the Y- and J-dropouts are quite unexpected. While no Y- or J-dropouts have been found at AB < 28.0 mag, their surface densities seem to increase sharply at fainter levels. While some of these candidates seem to be close to foreground galaxies and thus could possibly be gravitationally lensed, the overall surface densities after excluding such cases are still much higher than what would be expected if the luminosity function does not evolve from z~7 to 10. Motivated by such steep increases, we tentatively propose a set of Schechter function parameters to describe the LFs at z~8 and 10. As compared to their counterpart at z~7, here L* decreases by ~ 6.5x and Phi* increases by 17--90x. Although such parameters are not yet demanded by the existing observations, they are allowed and seem to agree with the data better than other alternatives. If these LFs are still valid beyond our current detection limit, this would imply a sudden emergence of a large number of low-luminosity galaxies when looking back in time to z~10, which, while seemingly exotic, would naturally fit in the picture of the cosmic hydrogen reionization. These early galaxies could easily account for the ionizing photon budget required by the reionization, and they would imply that the global star formation rate density might start from a very high value at z~10, rapidly reach the minimum at z~7, and start to rise again towards z~6. In this scenario, the majority of the stellar mass that the universe assembled through the reionization epoch seems still undetected by current observations at z~6. [Abridged]
  • We present NICMOS J110 (rest-frame 1200-2100 A) observations of the three z=5.7 Lyman Alpha emitters discovered in the blind multislit spectroscopic survey by Martin et al. (2008). These images confirm the presence of the two sources which were previously only seen in spectroscopic observations. The third source, which is undetected in our J110 observations has been detected in narrowband imaging of the Cosmic Origins Survey (COSMOS), so our nondetection implies a rest frame equivalent width >146 Angstroms (3 sigma). The two J110-- detected sources have more modest rest frame equivalent widths of 30-40 Angstroms, but all three are typical of high-redshift LAEs. In addition, the J110- detected sources have UV luminosities that are within a factor of two of L*_{UV}, and sizes that appear compact (r_{hl} ~ 0."15) in our NIC2 images -- consistent with a redshift of 5.7. We use these UV-continuum and Lyman Alpha measurements to estimate the i-z colors of these galaxies, and show that at least one, and possibly all three would be missed by the i-dropout LBG selection. These observations help demonstrate the utility of multislit narrowband spectroscopy as a technique for finding faint emission line galaxies.
  • We present Wide Field Camera 3 images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope within a single field in the southern grand design star-forming galaxy M83. Based on their size, morphology and photometry in continuum-subtracted H$\alpha$, [\SII], H$\beta$, [\OIII] and [\OII] filters, we have identified 60 supernova remnant candidates, as well as a handful of young ejecta-dominated candidates. A catalog of these remnants, their sizes and, where possible their H$\alpha$ fluxes are given. Radiative ages and pre-shock densities are derived from those SNR which have good photometry. The ages lie in the range $2.62 < log(\tau_{\rm rad}/{\rm yr}) < 5.0$, and the pre-shock densities at the blast wave range over $0.56 < n_0/{\rm cm^{-3}} < 1680$. Two populations of SNR have been discovered. These divide into a nuclear and spiral arm group and an inter-arm population. We infer an arm to inter-arm density contrast of 4. The surface flux in diffuse X-rays is correlated with the inferred pre-shock density, indicating that the warm interstellar medium is pressurised by the hot X-ray plasma. We also find that the interstellar medium in the nuclear region of M83 is characterized by a very high porosity and pressure and infer a SNR rate of one per 70-150 yr for the nuclear ($R<300 $pc) region. On the basis of the number of SNR detected and their radiative ages, we infer that the lower mass of Type II SNe in M83 is $M_{\rm min} = 16^{+7}_ {-5}$ M$_{\odot}$. Finally we give evidence for the likely detection of the remnant of the historical supernova, SN1968L.
  • We have carried out a search for galaxies at z ~ 7-10 in ~14.4 sq. arcmin of new NICMOS parallel imaging taken in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS, 5.9 sq. arcmin), the Cosmic Origins Survey (COSMOS, 7.2 sq. arcmin), and SSA22 (1.3 sq. arcmin). These images reach 5 sigma sensitivities of J110 = 26.0-27.5 (AB), and combined they increase the amount of deep near-infrared data by more than 60% in fields where the investment in deep optical data has already been made. We find no z>7 candidates in our survey area, consistent with the Bouwens et al. (2008) measurements at z~7 and 9 (over 23 sq. arcmin), which predict 0.7 galaxies at z~7 and <0.03 galaxies at z~9. We estimate that 10-20% of z>7 galaxies are missed by this survey, due to incompleteness from foreground contamination by faint sources. For the case of luminosity evolution, assuming a Schecter parameterization with a typical phi* = 10^-3 Mpc^-3, we find M* > -20.0 for z~7 and M* > -20.7 for z~9 (68% confidence). This suggests that the downward luminosity evolution of LBGs continues to z~7, although our result is marginally consistent with the z~6 LF of Bouwens et al.(2006, 2007). In addition we present newly-acquired deep MMT/Megacam imaging of the z~9 candidate JD2325+1433, first presented in Henry et al. (2008). The resulting weak but significant detection at i' indicates that this galaxy is most likely an interloper at z~2.7.
  • We determine the global star formation rate density at 0.7<z<1.9 using emission-line selected galaxies identified in Hubble Space Telescope Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrograph (HST-NICMOS) grism spectroscopy observations. Observing in pure parallel mode throughout HST Cycles 12 and 13, our survey covers ~104 arcmin2 from which we select 80 galaxies with likely redshifted Ha emission lines. In several cases, a somewhat weaker [OIII] doublet emission is also detected. The Ha luminosity range of the emission-line galaxy sample is 4.4 x 10^41 < L(Ha) < 1.5 x 10^43 erg/s. In this range, the luminosity function is well described by a Schechter function with phi* = (4.24\pm3.55) x 10^-3 Mpc^-3, L* = (2.88\pm1.58) x 10^42 erg/s, and alpha = -1.39\pm0.43. We derive a volume-averaged star formation rate density of 0.138\pm0.058 Msun/yr/Mpc3 at z=1.4 without an extinction correction. Subdividing the redshift range, we find star formation rate densities of 0.088\pm0.056 Msun/yr/Mpc3 at z=1.1 and 0.265\pm0.174 Msun/yr/Mpc3 at z=1.6. The overall star formation rate density is consistent with previous studies using Ha when the same average extinction correction is applied, confirming that the cosmic peak of star formation occurs at z>1.5.
  • We report the discovery of a z~9 Lyman Break Galaxy (LBG) candidate, selected from the NICMOS Parallel Imaging Survey as a J-dropout with J110 - H160 = 1.7. Spitzer/IRAC photometry reveals that the galaxy has a blue H160 - 3.6 um color, and a spectral break between 3.6 and 4.5 um. We interpret this break as the Balmer break, and derive a best-fit photometric redshift of z~9. We use Monte Carlo simulations to test the significance of this photometric redshift, and show a 96% probability of z>7. We estimate a lower limit to the comoving number density of such galaxies at z~9 of phi > 3.8 x 10^{-6} Mpc^{-3}. If the high redshift of this galaxy is confirmed, this will indicate that the luminous end of the rest-frame UV luminosity function has not evolved substantially from z~ 9 to z~3. Still, some small degeneracy remains between this z~9 model and models at z~2-3; deep optical imaging (reaching I ~ 29 AB) can rule out the lower-z models.
  • We show that there has been a dramatic decline in the abundance of massive galaxies with strong Hdelta stellar absorption lines from z=1.2 to the present. These ``Hdelta-strong'', or HDS, galaxies have undergone a recent and rapid break in their star-formation activity. Combining data from the Gemini Deep Deep and the Sloan Digital Sky Surveys to make mass-matched samples (M*>=10^10.2 Msun), with 25 and 50,255 galaxies, respectively), we find that the fraction of galaxies in an HDS phase has decreased from about 50% at z=1.2 to a few percent today. This decrease in fraction is due to an actual decrease in the number density of massive HDS systems by a factor of 2-4, coupled with an increase in the number density of massive galaxies by about 30 percent. We show that this result depends only weakly on the threshold chosen for the Hdelta equivalent width to define HDS systems (if greater than 4 A) and corresponds to a (1+z)^{2.5\pm 0.7} evolution. Spectral synthesis studies of the high-redshift population using the PEGASE code, treating Hdelta_A, EW[OII], Dn4000, and rest-frame colors, favor models in which the Balmer absorption features in massive Hdelta-strong systems are the echoes of intense episodes of star-formation that faded about 1 Gyr prior to the epoch of observation. The z=1.4-2 epoch appears to correspond to a time at which massive galaxies are in transition from a mode of sustained star formation to a relatively quiescent mode with weak and rare star-formation episodes. We argue that the most likely local descendants of the distant massive HDS galaxies are passively evolving massive galaxies in the field and small groups.
  • We measure the near-infrared properties of 42 X-ray detected sources from the Chandra Deep Fields North and South, the majority of which lie within the NICMOS Hubble Deep Field North and Ultra Deep Field. We detect all 42 Chandra sources with NICMOS, with 95% brighter than H = 24.5. We find that X-ray sources are most often in the brightest and most massive galaxies. Neither the X-ray fluxes nor hardness ratios of the sample show any correlation with near-infrared flux, color or morphology. This lack of correlation indicates there is little connection between the two emission mechanisms and is consistent with the near-infrared emission being dominated by starlight rather than a Seyfert non-stellar continuum. Near-infrared X-ray sources make up roughly half of all extremely red (J-H > 1.4) objects brighter than H > 24.5. These red X-ray sources have a range of hardness ratios similar to the rest of the sample, decreasing the likelihood of dust-obscured AGN activity as the sole explanation for their red color. Using a combination of spectroscopic and photometric redshifts, we find the red J-H objects are at high redshifts (z > 1.5), which we propose as the primary explanation for their extreme J-H color. Measurement of rest-wavelength absolute B magnitudes shows that X-ray sources are the brightest optical objects at all redshifts, which explains their dominance of the bright end of the red J-H population.
  • Hierarchical galaxy formation is the model whereby massive galaxies form from an assembly of smaller units. The most massive objects therefore form last. The model succeeds in describing the clustering of galaxies, but the evolutionary history of massive galaxies, as revealed by their visible stars and gas, is not accurately predicted. Near-infrared observations (which allow us to measure the stellar masses of high-redshift galaxies) and deep multi-colour images indicate that a large fraction of the stars in massive galaxies form in the first 5 Gyr, but uncertainties remain owing to the lack of spectra to confirm the redshifts (which are estimated from the colours) and the role of obscuration by dust. Here we report the results of a spectroscopic redshift survey that probes the most massive and quiescent galaxies back to an era only 3 Gyr after the Big Bang. We find that at least two-thirds of massive galaxies have appeared since this era, but also that a significant fraction of them are already in place in the early Universe.
  • We report results from the first 1000 square arc-minutes of the Las Campanas IR survey. We have imaged 1 square degree of high latitude sky in six distinct fields to a 5-sigma H-band depth of 20.5 (Vega). Optical imaging in the V,R,I,and z' bands allow us to select color subsets and photometric-redshift-defined shells. We show that the angular clustering of faint red galaxies (18 < H < 20.5, I - H > 3) is an order of magnitude stronger than that of the complete H-selected field sample. We employ three approaches to estimate $n(z)$ in order to invert w(theta) to derive r_0. We find that our n(z) is well described by a Gaussian with <z> = 1.2, sigma(z) = 0.15. From this we derive a value for r_0 of 7 (+2,-1) co-moving H^{-1} Mpc at <z> = 1.2. This is a factor of ~ 2 larger than the clustering length for Lyman break galaxies and is similar to the expectation for early type galaxies at this epoch.