• This review covers results on the production of all possible electroweak boson pairs and 2-to-1 vector boson fusion at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in proton-proton collisions at a center of mass energy of 7 and 8 TeV. The data were taken between 2010 and 2012. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings (aTGCs) then follow. In addition, data on electroweak triple gauge boson production and 2-to-2 vector boson scattering yield limits on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings (aQGCs). The LHC hosts two general purpose experiments, ATLAS and CMS, which have both reported limits on aTGCs and aQGCs which are herein summarized. The interpretation of these limits in terms of an effective field theory is reviewed, and recommendations are made for testing other types of new physics using multi-gauge boson production.
  • The presence of weak-scale colored top partners is among the simplest solutions to the Higgs hierarchy problem and allows for a natural electroweak scale. We examine the constraints on generic colored top partners coming solely from their effect on the production and decay rates of the observed Higgs with a mass of 125 GeV. We use the latest Higgs precision data from the Tevatron and the LHC as of EPS 2017 to derive the current limits on spin-0, spin-1/2, and spin-1 colored top partners. We also investigate the expected sensitivity from the Run 3 and Run 4 of the LHC, as well from possible future electron-positron and proton-proton colliders, including the ILC, CEPC, FCC-ee, and FCC-hh. We discuss constraints on top partners in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model and Little Higgs theories. We also consider various model-building aspects--multiple top partners, modified couplings between the Higgs and Standard-Model particles, and non-Standard-Model Higgs sectors--and evaluate how these weaken the current limits and expected sensitivities. By modifying other Standard-Model Higgs couplings, we find that the best way to hide low-mass top partners from current data is through modifications of the top-Yukawa coupling, although future measurements of top-quark-pair production in association with a Higgs will extensively probe this possibility. We also demonstrate that models with multiple top partners can generically avoid current and future Higgs precision measurements. Nevertheless, some of the model parameter space can be probed with precision measurements at future electron-positron colliders of, for example, the e+ e- -> Zh cross section.
  • The consequences of phase transitions in the early universe are becoming testable in a variety of manners, from colliders physics to gravitational wave astronomy. In particular one phase transition we know of, the Electroweak Phase Transition (EWPT), could potentially be first order in BSM scenarios and testable in the near future. If confirmed this could provide a mechanism for Baryogenesis, which is one of the most important outstanding questions in physics. To reliably make predictions it is necessary to have full control of the finite temperature scalar potentials. However, as we show the standard methods used in BSM physics to improve phase transition calculations, resumming hard thermal loops, introduces significant errors into the scalar potential. In addition, the standard methods make it impossible to match theories to an EFT description reliably. In this paper we define a thermal resummation procedure based on Partial Dressing (PD) for general BSM calculations of phase transitions beyond the high-temperature approximation. Additionally, we introduce the modified Optimized Partial Dressing (OPD) procedure, which is numerically nearly as efficient as old incorrect methods, while yielding identical results to the full PD calculation. This can be easily applied to future BSM studies of phase transitions in the early universe. As an example, we show that in unmixed singlet scalar extensions of the SM, the (O)PD calculations make new phenomenological predictions compared to previous analyses. An important future application is the study of EFTs at finite temperature.
  • In this paper we demonstrate the agreement of jet-veto resummation and pT resummation for explaining the WW cross sections at Run 1 of the LHC, and in the future. These two resummation techniques resum different logarithms, however via reweighting methods they can be compared for various differential or exclusive cross sections. We find excellent agreement between the two resummation methods for predicting the zero-jet cross section, and propose a new reweighting method for jet-veto resummation that can be used to compare other differential distributions. We advocate a cross-channel comparison for the high-luminosity run of the LHC as both a test of QCD and new physics.
  • ATLAS and CMS recently released the first results of searches for diphoton resonances in 13 TeV data, revealing a modest excess at an invariant mass of approximately 750 GeV. We find that it is generically possible that a singlet scalar resonance is the origin of the excess while avoiding all other constraints. We highlight some of the implications of this model and how compatible it is with certain features of the experimental results. In particular, we find that the very large total width of the excess is difficult to explain with loop-level decays alone, pointing to other interesting bounds and signals if this feature of the data persists. Finally we comment on the robust Z-gamma signature that will always accompany the model we investigate.
  • Electroweak Baryogenesis (EWBG) is a compelling scenario for explaining the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe. Its connection to the electroweak phase transition makes it inherently testable. However, completely excluding this scenario can seem difficult in practice, due to the sheer number of proposed models. We investigate the possibility of postulating a "no-lose" theorem for testing EWBG in future e+e- or hadron colliders. As a first step we focus on a factorized picture of EWBG which separates the sources of a stronger phase transition from those that provide new sources of CP violation. We then construct a "nightmare scenario" that generates a strong first-order phase transition as required by EWBG, but is very difficult to test experimentally. We show that a 100 TeV hadron collider is both necessary and possibly sufficient for testing the parameter space of the nightmare scenario that is consistent with EWBG.
  • The basic principle of naturalness has driven the majority of the LHC program, but so far all searches for new physics beyond the SM have come up empty. On the other hand, existing measurements of SM processes contain interesting anomalies, which allow for the possibility of new physics with mass scales very close to the Electroweak Scale. In this paper we show that SUSY could have stops with masses ~ O(200) GeV based on an anomaly in the WW cross section, measured by both ATLAS and CMS at 7 and 8 TeV. In particular we show that there are several different classes of stop driven scenarios that not only evade all direct searches, but improve the agreement with the data in the SM measurement of the WW cross section.
  • The W^+W^- cross section has remained one of the most consistently discrepant channels compared to SM predictions at the LHC, measured by both ATLAS and CMS at 7 and 8 TeV. Developing a better modeling of this channel is crucial to understanding properties of the Higgs and potential new physics. In this paper we investigate the effects of NNLL transverse momentum resummation in measuring the W^+W^- cross section. In the formalism we employ, transverse momentum resummation does not change the total inclusive cross section, but gives a more accurate prediction for the p_T distribution of the diboson system. By re-weighting the p_T distribution of events produced by Monte Carlo generators, we find a systematic shift that decreases the experimental discrepancy with the SM prediction by approximately 3-7% depending on the MC generator and parton shower used. The primary effect comes from the jet veto cut used by both experiments. We comment on the connections to jet veto resummation, and other methods the experiments can use to test this effect. We also discuss the correlation of resummation effects in this channel with other diboson channels. Ultimately p_T resummation improves the agreement between the SM and experimental measurements for most generators, but does not account for the measured ~20% difference with the SM and further investigations into this channel are needed.
  • The Standard Model (SM) has had resounding success in describing almost every measurement performed by the ATLAS and CMS experiments. In particular, these experiments have put many beyond the SM models of natural Electroweak Symmetry Breaking into tension with the data. It is therefore remarkable that it is still the LEP experiment, and not the LHC, which often sets the gold standard for understanding the possibility of new color-neutral states at the electroweak (EW) scale. Recently, ATLAS and CMS have started to push beyond LEP in bounding heavy new EW states, but a gap between the exclusions of LEP and the LHC typically remains. In this paper we show that measurements of SM Standard Candles can be repurposed to set entirely complementary constraints on new physics. To demonstrate this, we use WW cross section measurements to set bounds on a set of slepton-based simplified models which fill in the gaps left by LEP and dedicated LHC searches. Having demonstrated the sensitivity of the WW measurement to light sleptons, we also find regions where sleptons can improve the fit of the data compared to the NLO SM WW prediction alone. Remarkably, in those regions the sleptons also provide for the right relic-density of Bino-like Dark Matter and provide an explanation for the longstanding 3 sigma discrepancy in the measurement of (g-2)_\mu.
  • Recent 7 TeV 5/fb measurements by ATLAS and CMS have measured both overall and differential WW cross sections that differ from NLO SM predictions. While these measurements aren't statistically significant enough to rule out the SM, we demonstrate that the data from both experiments can be better fit with the inclusion of electroweak gauginos with masses of O(100) GeV. We show that these new states are consistent with other experimental searches/measurements and can have ramifications for Higgs phenomenology. Additionally, we show how the first measurements of the WW cross section at 8 TeV by CMS strengthen our conclusions.
  • In the context of the MSSM the Light Stop Scenario (LSS) is the only region of parameter space that allows for successful Electroweak Baryogenesis (EWBG). This possibility is very phenomenologically attractive, since it allows for the direct production of light stops and could be tested at the LHC. The ATLAS and CMS experiments have recently supplied tantalizing hints for a Higgs boson with a mass of ~ 125 GeV. This Higgs mass severely restricts the parameter space of the LSS, and we discuss the specific predictions made for EWBG in the MSSM. Combining data from all the available ATLAS and CMS Higgs searches reveals a tension with the predictions of EWBG even at this early stage. This allows us to exclude EWBG in the MSSM at greater than (90) 95% confidence level in the (non-)decoupling limit, by examining correlations between different Higgs decay channels. We also examine the exclusion without the assumption of a ~ 125 GeV Higgs. The Higgs searches are still highly constraining, excluding the entire EWBG parameter space at greater than 90% CL except for a small window of m_h ~ 117 - 119 GeV.
  • Recently, the ATLAS and CMS collaborations have announced exciting hints for a Standard Model-like Higgs boson at a mass of approximately 125 GeV. In this paper, we explore the potential consequences for the MSSM and low scale SUSY-breaking. As is well-known, a 125 GeV Higgs implies either extremely heavy stops (>~ 10 TeV), or near-maximal stop mixing. We review and quantify these statements, and investigate the implications for models of low-scale SUSY breaking such as gauge mediation where the A-terms are small at the messenger scale. For such models, we find that either a gaugino must be superheavy or the NLSP is long-lived. Furthermore, stops will be tachyonic at high scales. These are very strong restrictions on the mediation of supersymmetry breaking in the MSSM, and suggest that if the Higgs truly is at 125 GeV, viable models of gauge-mediated supersymmetry breaking are reduced to small corners of parameter space or must incorporate new Higgs-sector physics.
  • We thoroughly investigate the current status of supersymmetry in light of the latest searches at the LHC, using General Gauge Mediation (GGM) as a well-motivated signature generator that leads to many different simplified models. We consider all possible promptly-decaying NLSPs in GGM, and by carefully reinterpreting the existing LHC searches, we derive limits on both colored and electroweak SUSY production. Overall, the coverage of GGM parameter space is quite good, but much discovery potential still remains even at 7 TeV. We identify several regions of parameter space where the current searches are the weakest, typically in models with electroweak production, third generation sfermions or squeezed spectra, and we suggest how ATLAS and CMS might modify their search strategies given the understanding of GMSB at 1/fb. In particular, we propose the use of leptonic $M_{T2}$ to suppress $t{\bar t}$ backgrounds. Because we express our results in terms of simplified models, they have broader applicability beyond the GGM framework, and give a global view of the current LHC reach. Our results on 3rd generation squark NLSPs in particular can be viewed as setting direct limits on naturalness.
  • This document proposes a collection of simplified models relevant to the design of new-physics searches at the LHC and the characterization of their results. Both ATLAS and CMS have already presented some results in terms of simplified models, and we encourage them to continue and expand this effort, which supplements both signature-based results and benchmark model interpretations. A simplified model is defined by an effective Lagrangian describing the interactions of a small number of new particles. Simplified models can equally well be described by a small number of masses and cross-sections. These parameters are directly related to collider physics observables, making simplified models a particularly effective framework for evaluating searches and a useful starting point for characterizing positive signals of new physics. This document serves as an official summary of the results from the "Topologies for Early LHC Searches" workshop, held at SLAC in September of 2010, the purpose of which was to develop a set of representative models that can be used to cover all relevant phase space in experimental searches. Particular emphasis is placed on searches relevant for the first ~50-500 pb-1 of data and those motivated by supersymmetric models. This note largely summarizes material posted at http://lhcnewphysics.org/, which includes simplified model definitions, Monte Carlo material, and supporting contacts within the theory community. We also comment on future developments that may be useful as more data is gathered and analyzed by the experiments.
  • New physics that exhibits irregular tracks such as kinks, intermittent hits or decay in flight may easily be missed at hadron colliders. We demonstrate this by studying viable models of light, O(10 GeV), colored particles that decay predominantly inside the tracker. Such particles can be produced at staggering rates, and yet may not be identified or even triggered on at the LHC, unless specifically searched for. In addition, the models we study provide an explanation for the original measurement of the anomalous charged track distribution by CDF. The presence of irregular tracks in these models reconcile that measurement with the subsequent reanalysis and the null results of ATLAS and CMS. Our study clearly illustrates the need for a comprehensive study of irregular tracks at the LHC.
  • We investigate the collider signatures of heavy, long-lived, neutral particles that decay to charged particles plus missing energy. Specifically, we focus on the case of a neutralino NLSP decaying to Z and gravitino within the context of General Gauge Mediation. We show that a combination of searches using the inner detector and the muon spectrometer yields a wide range of potential early LHC discoveries for NLSP lifetimes ranging from 10^(-1)-10^5 mm. We further show that events from Z(l+l-) can be used for detailed kinematic reconstruction, leading to accurate determinations of the neutralino mass and lifetime. In particular, we examine the prospects for detailed event study at ATLAS using the ECAL (making use of its timing and pointing capabilities) together with the TRT, or using the muon spectrometer alone. Finally, we also demonstrate that there is a region in parameter space where the Tevatron could potentially discover new physics in the delayed Z(l+l-)+MET channel. While our discussion centers on gauge mediation, many of the results apply to any scenario with a long-lived neutral particle decaying to charged particles.
  • The cosmic-ray excess observed by PAMELA in the positron fraction and by FERMI and HESS in the electron + positron flux can be interpreted in terms of DM annihilations or decays into leptonic final states. Final states into tau's or 4mu give the best fit to the excess. However, in the annihilation scenario, they are incompatible with photon and neutrino constraints, unless DM has a quasi-constant density profile. Final states involving electrons are less constrained but poorly fit the excess, unless hidden sector radiation makes their energy spectrum smoother, allowing a fit to all the data with a combination of leptonic modes. In general, DM lighter than about a TeV cannot fit the excesses, so PAMELA should find a greater positron fraction at higher energies. The DM interpretation can be tested by FERMI gamma observations above 10 GeV: if the electronic excess is everywhere in the DM halo, inverse Compton scattering on ambient light produces a well-predicted gamma excess that FERMI should soon detect.
  • We explore various aspects of General Gauge Mediation(GGM). We present a reformulation of the correlation functions used in GGM, and further elucidate their IR and UV properties. Additionally we clarify the issue of UV sensitivity in the calculation of the soft masses in the MSSM, highlighting the role of the supertrace over the messenger spectrum. Finally, we present weakly coupled messenger models which fully cover the parameter space of GGM. These examples demonstrate that the full parameter space of GGM is physical and realizable. Thus it should be considered a valid basis for future phenomenological explorations of gauge mediation.
  • Recent theoretical developments have shown that gauge mediation has a much larger parameter space of possible spectra and mixings than previously considered. Motivated by this, we explore the collider phenomenology of gauge mediation models where a general neutralino is the lightest MSSM superpartner (the NLSP), focusing on the potential reach from existing and future Tevatron searches. Promptly decaying general neutralino NLSPs can give rise to final states involving missing energy plus photons, Zs, Ws and/or Higgses. We survey the final states and determine those where the Tevatron should have the most sensitivity. We then estimate the reach of existing Tevatron searches in these final states and discuss new searches (or optimizations of existing ones) that should improve the reach. Finally we comment on the potential for discovery at the LHC.
  • An intriguing possibility for TeV scale physics is the existence of neutral long lived particles (LOLIPs) that subsequently decay into SM states. Such particles are many cases indistinguishable from missing transverse energy (MET) at colliders. We propose new methods to search for these particles using neutrino telescopes. We study their detection prospects, assuming production either at the LHC or through dark matter (DM) annihilations in the Sun and the Earth. We find that the sensitivity for LOLIPs produced at the LHC is limited by luminosity and detection energy thresholds. On the other hand, in the case of DM annihilation into LOLIPs, the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes is promising and may extend beyond the reach of upcoming direct detection experiments. In the context of low scale hidden sectors weakly coupled to the SM, such indirect searches allow to probe couplings as small as 10^-15.
  • We construct a Dark Matter (DM) annihilation module that can encompass the predictions from a wide array of models built to explain the recently reported PAMELA and ATIC/PPB-BETS excesses. We present a detailed analysis of the injection spectrums for DM annihilation and quantitatively demonstrate effects that have previously not been included from the particle physics perspective. With this module we demonstrate the parameter space that can account for the aforementioned excesses and be compatible with existing high energy gamma ray and neutrino experiments. However, we find that it is relatively generic to have some tension between the results of the HESS experiment and the ATIC/PPB-BETS experiments within the context of annihilating DM. We discuss ways to alleviate this tension and how upcoming experiments will be able to differentiate amongst the various possible explanations of the purported excesses.
  • We give a general definition of gauge mediated supersymmetry breaking which encompasses all the known gauge mediation models. In particular, it includes both models with messengers as well as direct mediation models. A formalism for computing the soft terms in the generic model is presented. Such a formalism is necessary in strongly-coupled direct mediation models where perturbation theory cannot be used. It allows us to identify features of the entire class of gauge mediation models and to distinguish them from specific signatures of various subclasses.
  • We present the manual for the program BRIDGE: Branching Ratio Inquiry/Decay Generated Events. The program is designed to operate with arbitrary models defined within matrix element generators, so that one can simulate events with small final-state multiplicities, decay them with BRIDGE, and then pass them to showering and hadronization programs. BRI can automatically calculate widths of two and three body decays. DGE can decay unstable particles in any Les Houches formatted event file. DGE is useful for the generation of event files with long decay chains, replacing large matrix elements by small matrix elements followed by sequences of decays. BRIDGE is currently designed to work with the MadGraph/MadEvent programs for implementing and simulating new physics models. In particular, it can operate with the MadGraph implementation of the MSSM. In this manual we describe how to use BRIDGE, and present a number of sample results to demonstrate its accuracy.
  • We argue that the highly studied black hole signatures based on thermal multiparticle final states are very unlikely and only occur in a very limited parameter regime if at all. However, we show that if the higher-dimensional quantum gravity scale is low, it should be possible to study quantum gravity in the context of higher dimensions through detailed compositeness-type searches.
  • We compute the leading corrections to the properties of W and Z bosons induced at the one-loop level in the SU(5)/SO(5) Littlest Higgs model with T parity, and perform a global fit to precision electroweak data to determine the constraints on the model parameters. We find that a large part of the model parameter space is consistent with data. Values of the symmetry breaking scale as low as 500 GeV are allowed, indicating that no significant fine tuning in the Higgs potential is required. We identify a region within the allowed parameter space in which the lightest T-odd particle, the partner of the hypercharge gauge boson, has the correct relic abundance to play the role of dark matter. In addition, we find that a consistent fit to data can be obtained for large values of the Higgs mass, up to 800 GeV, due to the possibility of a partial cancellation between the contributions to the T parameter from Higgs loops and new physics.