• We present the Advanced Camera for Surveys General Catalog (ACS-GC), a photometric and morphological database using publicly available data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) instrument on the Hubble Space Telescope. The goal of the ACS-GC database is to provide a large statistical sample of galaxies with reliable structural and distance measurements to probe the evolution of galaxies over a wide range of look-back times. The ACS-GC includes approximately 470,000 astronomical sources (stars + galaxies) derived from the AEGIS, COSMOS, GEMS, and GOODS surveys. Galapagos was used to construct photometric (SExtractor) and morphological (Galfit) catalogs. The analysis assumes a single S\'ersic model for each object to derive quantitative structural parameters. We include publicly available redshifts from the DEEP2, COMBO-17, TKRS, PEARS, ACES, CFHTLS,and zCOSMOS surveys to supply redshifts (spectroscopic and photometric) for a considerable fraction (~74%) of the imaging sample. The ACS-GC includes color postage stamps, Galfit residual images, and photometry, structural parameters, and redshifts combined into a single catalog.
  • The Chandra COSMOS Survey (C-COSMOS) is a large, 1.8 Ms, Chandra} program that has imaged the central 0.5 sq.deg of the COSMOS field (centered at 10h, +02deg) with an effective exposure of ~160ksec, and an outer 0.4sq.deg. area with an effective exposure of ~80ksec. The limiting source detection depths are 1.9e-16 erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the Soft (0.5-2 keV) band, 7.3e(-16) erg cm^-2 s^-1 in the Hard (2-10 keV) band, and 5.7e(-16) erg cm(-2) s(-1) in the Full (0.5-10 keV) band. Here we describe the strategy, design and execution of the C-COSMOS survey, and present the catalog of 1761 point sources detected at a probability of being spurious of <2e(-5) (1655 in the Full, 1340 in the Soft, and 1017 in the Hard bands). By using a grid of 36 heavily (~50%) overlapping pointing positions with the ACIS-I imager, a remarkably uniform (to 12%) exposure across the inner 0.5 sq.deg field was obtained, leading to a sharply defined lower flux limit. The widely different PSFs obtained in each exposure at each point in the field required a novel source detection method, because of the overlapping tiling strategy, which is described in a companion paper. (Puccetti et al. Paper II). This method produced reliable sources down to a 7-12 counts, as verified by the resulting logN-logS curve, with sub-arcsecond positions, enabling optical and infrared identifications of virtually all sources, as reported in a second companion paper (Civano et al. Paper III). The full catalog is described here in detail, and is available on-line.
  • We present a three dimensional cosmic shear analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope COSMOS survey, the largest ever optical imaging program performed in space. We have measured the shapes of galaxies for the tell-tale distortions caused by weak gravitational lensing, and traced the growth of that signal as a function of redshift. Using both 2D and 3D analyses, we measure cosmological parameters Omega_m, the density of matter in the universe, and sigma_8, the normalization of the matter power spectrum. The introduction of redshift information tightens the constraints by a factor of three, and also reduces the relative sampling (or "cosmic") variance compared to recent surveys that may be larger but are only two dimensional. From the 3D analysis, we find sigma_8*(Omega_m/0.3)^0.44=0.866+^0.085_-0.068 at 68% confidence limits, including both statistical and potential systematic sources of error in the total budget. Indeed, the absolute calibration of shear measurement methods is now the dominant source of uncertainty. Assuming instead a baseline cosmology to fix the geometry of the universe, we have measured the growth of structure on both linear and non-linear physical scales. Our results thus demonstrate a proof of concept for tomographic analysis techniques that have been proposed for future weak lensing surveys by a dedicated wide-field telescope in space.
  • A redshift survey has been carried out in the region of the Hubble Deep Field North using the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph at the Keck Observatory. The resulting redshift catalog, which contains 671 entries, is a compendium of our own data together with published LRIS/Keck data. It is more than 92% complete for objects, irrespective of morphology, to $R = 24$ mag in the HDF itself and to $R = 23$ mag in the Flanking Fields within a diameter of 8 arcmin centered on the HDF, an unusually high completion for a magnitude limited survey performed with a large telescope. A median redshift $z = 1.0$ is reached at $R \sim 23.8$. Strong peaks in the redshift distribution, which arise when a group or poor cluster of galaxies intersect the area surveyed, can be identified to $z \sim 1.2$ in this dataset. More than 68% of the galaxies are members of these redshift peaks. In a few cases, closely spaced peaks in $z$ can be resolved into separate groups of galaxies that can be distinguished in both velocity and location on the sky. The radial separation of these peaks in the pencil-beam survey is consistent with a characteristic length scale for the their separation of $\approx$70 Mpc in our adopted cosmology ($h = 0.6, \Omega_M = 0.3$, $\Lambda = 0$). Strong galaxy clustering is in evidence at all epochs back to $z \le 1.1$. (abstract abridged)
  • We present initial results from a redshift survey carried out with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph on the 10~m W. M. Keck Telescope in the Hubble Deep Field. In the redshift distribution of the 140 extragalactic objects in this sample we find 6 strong peaks, with velocity dispersions of ${\sim}400${\kms}. The areal density of objects within a particular peak, while it may be non-uniform, does not show evidence for strong central concentration. These peaks have characteristics (velocity dispersions, density enhancements, spacing, and spatial extent) similar to those seen in a comparable redshift survey in a different high galactic latitude field (Cohen et al 1996), confirming that the structures are generic. They are probably the high redshift counterparts of huge galaxy structures (``walls'') observed locally.