• We eliminate a key roadblock to efficient verification of nonlinear integer arithmetic using CDCL SAT solvers, by showing how to construct short resolution proofs for many properties of the most widely used multiplier circuits. Such short proofs were conjectured not to exist. More precisely, we give n^{O(1)} size regular resolution proofs for arbitrary degree 2 identities on array, diagonal, and Booth multipliers and quasipolynomial- n^{O(\log n)} size proofs for these identities on Wallace tree multipliers.
  • We introduce and develop a new semi-algebraic proof system, called Stabbing Planes that is in the style of DPLL-based modern SAT solvers. As with DPLL, there is only one rule: the current polytope can be subdivided by branching on an inequality and its "integer negation." That is, we can (nondeterministically choose) a hyperplane a x \geq b with integer coefficients, which partitions the polytope into three pieces: the points in the polytope satisfying a x \geq b, the points satisfying a x \leq b-1, and the middle slab b-1 < a x < b. Since the middle slab contains no integer points it can be safely discarded, and the algorithm proceeds recursively on the other two branches. Each path terminates when the current polytope is empty, which is polynomial-time checkable. Among our results, we show somewhat surprisingly that Stabbing Planes can efficiently simulate Cutting Planes, and moreover, is strictly stronger than Cutting Planes under a reasonable conjecture. We prove linear lower bounds on the rank of Stabbing Planes refutations, by adapting a lifting argument in communication complexity.
  • We develop an extension of recently developed methods for obtaining time-space tradeoff lower bounds for problems of learning from random test samples to handle the situation where the space of tests is signficantly smaller than the space of inputs, a class of learning problems that is not handled by prior work. This extension is based on a measure of how matrices amplify the 2-norms of probability distributions that is more refined than the 2-norms of these matrices. As applications that follow from our new technique, we show that any algorithm that learns $m$-variate homogeneous polynomial functions of degree at most $d$ over $\mathbb{F}_2$ from evaluations on randomly chosen inputs either requires space $\Omega(mn)$ or $2^{\Omega(m)}$ time where $n=m^{\Theta(d)}$ is the dimension of the space of such functions. These bounds are asymptotically optimal since they match the tradeoffs achieved by natural learning algorithms for the problems.
  • We study distributed protocols for finding all pairs of similar vectors in a large dataset. Our results pertain to a variety of discrete metrics, and we give concrete instantiations for Hamming distance. In particular, we give improved upper bounds on the overhead required for similarity defined by Hamming distance $r>1$ and prove a lower bound showing qualitative optimality of the overhead required for similarity over any Hamming distance $r$. Our main conceptual contribution is a connection between similarity search algorithms and certain graph-theoretic quantities. For our upper bounds, we exhibit a general method for designing one-round protocols using edge-isoperimetric shapes in similarity graphs. For our lower bounds, we define a new combinatorial optimization problem, which can be stated in purely graph-theoretic terms yet also captures the core of the analysis in previous theoretical work on distributed similarity joins. As one of our main technical results, we prove new bounds on distance correlations in subsets of the Hamming cube.
  • A formulation of "Ne\v{c}iporuk's lower bound method" slightly more inclusive than the usual complexity-measure-specific formulation is presented. Using this general formulation, limitations to lower bounds achievable by the method are obtained for several computation models, such as branching programs and Boolean formulas having access to a sublinear number of nondeterministic bits. In particular, it is shown that any lower bound achievable by the method of Ne\v{c}iporuk for the size of nondeterministic and parity branching programs is at most $O(n^{3/2}/\log n)$.
  • In this paper, we study the communication complexity for the problem of computing a conjunctive query on a large database in a parallel setting with $p$ servers. In contrast to previous work, where upper and lower bounds on the communication were specified for particular structures of data (either data without skew, or data with specific types of skew), in this work we focus on worst-case analysis of the communication cost. The goal is to find worst-case optimal parallel algorithms, similar to the work of [18] for sequential algorithms. We first show that for a single round we can obtain an optimal worst-case algorithm. The optimal load for a conjunctive query $q$ when all relations have size equal to $M$ is $O(M/p^{1/\psi^*})$, where $\psi^*$ is a new query-related quantity called the edge quasi-packing number, which is different from both the edge packing number and edge cover number of the query hypergraph. For multiple rounds, we present algorithms that are optimal for several classes of queries. Finally, we show a surprising connection to the external memory model, which allows us to translate parallel algorithms to external memory algorithms. This technique allows us to recover (within a polylogarithmic factor) several recent results on the I/O complexity for computing join queries, and also obtain optimal algorithms for other classes of queries.
  • We study the problem of computing conjunctive queries over large databases on parallel architectures without shared storage. Using the structure of such a query $q$ and the skew in the data, we study tradeoffs between the number of processors, the number of rounds of communication, and the per-processor load -- the number of bits each processor can send or can receive in a single round -- that are required to compute $q$. When the data is free of skew, we obtain essentially tight upper and lower bounds for one round algorithms and we show how the bounds degrade when there is skew in the data. In the case of skewed data, we show how to improve the algorithms when approximate degrees of the heavy-hitter elements are available, obtaining essentially optimal algorithms for queries such as simple joins and triangle join queries. For queries that we identify as tree-like, we also prove nearly matching upper and lower bounds for multi-round algorithms for a natural class of skew-free databases. One consequence of these latter lower bounds is that for any $\varepsilon>0$, using $p$ processors to compute the connected components of a graph, or to output the path, if any, between a specified pair of vertices of a graph with $m$ edges and per-processor load that is $O(m/p^{1-\varepsilon})$ requires $\Omega(\log p)$ rounds of communication. Our upper bounds are given by simple structured algorithms using MapReduce. Our one-round lower bounds are proved in a very general model, which we call the Massively Parallel Communication (MPC) model, that allows processors to communicate arbitrary bits. Our multi-round lower bounds apply in a restricted version of the MPC model in which processors in subsequent rounds after the first communication round are only allowed to send tuples.
  • We show new limits on the efficiency of using current techniques to make exact probabilistic inference for large classes of natural problems. In particular we show new lower bounds on knowledge compilation to SDD and DNNF forms. We give strong lower bounds on the complexity of SDD representations by relating SDD size to best-partition communication complexity. We use this relationship to prove exponential lower bounds on the SDD size for representing a large class of problems that occur naturally as queries over probabilistic databases. A consequence is that for representing unions of conjunctive queries, SDDs are not qualitatively more concise than OBDDs. We also derive simple examples for which SDDs must be exponentially less concise than FBDDs. Finally, we derive exponential lower bounds on the sizes of DNNF representations using a new quasipolynomial simulation of DNNFs by nondeterministic FBDDs.
  • The FO Model Counting problem (FOMC) is the following: given a sentence $\Phi$ in FO and a number $n$, compute the number of models of $\Phi$ over a domain of size $n$; the Weighted variant (WFOMC) generalizes the problem by associating a weight to each tuple and defining the weight of a model to be the product of weights of its tuples. In this paper we study the complexity of the symmetric WFOMC, where all tuples of a given relation have the same weight. Our motivation comes from an important application, inference in Knowledge Bases with soft constraints, like Markov Logic Networks, but the problem is also of independent theoretical interest. We study both the data complexity, and the combined complexity of FOMC and WFOMC. For the data complexity we prove the existence of an FO$^{3}$ formula for which FOMC is #P$_1$-complete, and the existence of a Conjunctive Query for which WFOMC is #P$_1$-complete. We also prove that all $\gamma$-acyclic queries have polynomial time data complexity. For the combined complexity, we prove that, for every fragment FO$^{k}$, $k\geq 2$, the combined complexity of FOMC (or WFOMC) is #P-complete.
  • We prove that any oblivious algorithm using space $S$ to find the median of a list of $n$ integers from $\{1,...,2n\}$ requires time $\Omega(n \log\log_S n)$. This bound also applies to the problem of determining whether the median is odd or even. It is nearly optimal since Chan, following Munro and Raman, has shown that there is a (randomized) selection algorithm using only $s$ registers, each of which can store an input value or $O(\log n)$-bit counter, that makes only $O(\log\log_s n)$ passes over the input. The bound also implies a size lower bound for read-once branching programs computing the low order bit of the median and implies the analog of $P \ne NP \cap coNP$ for length $o(n \log\log n)$ oblivious branching programs.
  • We study the problem of computing a conjunctive query q in parallel, using p of servers, on a large database. We consider algorithms with one round of communication, and study the complexity of the communication. We are especially interested in the case where the data is skewed, which is a major challenge for scalable parallel query processing. We establish a tight connection between the fractional edge packings of the query and the amount of communication, in two cases. First, in the case when the only statistics on the database are the cardinalities of the input relations, and the data is skew-free, we provide matching upper and lower bounds (up to a poly log p factor) expressed in terms of fractional edge packings of the query q. Second, in the case when the relations are skewed and the heavy hitters and their frequencies are known, we provide upper and lower bounds (up to a poly log p factor) expressed in terms of packings of residual queries obtained by specializing the query to a heavy hitter. All our lower bounds are expressed in the strongest form, as number of bits needed to be communicated between processors with unlimited computational power. Our results generalizes some prior results on uniform databases (where each relation is a matching) [4], and other lower bounds for the MapReduce model [1].
  • Query evaluation in tuple-independent probabilistic databases is the problem of computing the probability of an answer to a query given independent probabilities of the individual tuples in a database instance. There are two main approaches to this problem: (1) in `grounded inference' one first obtains the lineage for the query and database instance as a Boolean formula, then performs weighted model counting on the lineage (i.e., computes the probability of the lineage given probabilities of its independent Boolean variables); (2) in methods known as `lifted inference' or `extensional query evaluation', one exploits the high-level structure of the query as a first-order formula. Although it is widely believed that lifted inference is strictly more powerful than grounded inference on the lineage alone, no formal separation has previously been shown for query evaluation. In this paper we show such a formal separation for the first time. We exhibit a class of queries for which model counting can be done in polynomial time using extensional query evaluation, whereas the algorithms used in state-of-the-art exact model counters on their lineages provably require exponential time. Our lower bounds on the running times of these exact model counters follow from new exponential size lower bounds on the kinds of d-DNNF representations of the lineages that these model counters (either explicitly or implicitly) produce. Though some of these queries have been studied before, no non-trivial lower bounds on the sizes of these representations for these queries were previously known.
  • The best current methods for exactly computing the number of satisfying assignments, or the satisfying probability, of Boolean formulas can be seen, either directly or indirectly, as building 'decision-DNNF' (decision decomposable negation normal form) representations of the input Boolean formulas. Decision-DNNFs are a special case of 'd-DNNF's where 'd' stands for 'deterministic'. We show that any decision-DNNF can be converted into an equivalent 'FBDD' (free binary decision diagram) -- also known as a 'read-once branching program' (ROBP or 1-BP) -- with only a quasipolynomial increase in representation size in general, and with only a polynomial increase in size in the special case of monotone k-DNF formulas. Leveraging known exponential lower bounds for FBDDs, we then obtain similar exponential lower bounds for decision-DNNFs which provide lower bounds for the recent algorithms. We also separate the power of decision-DNNFs from d-DNNFs and a generalization of decision-DNNFs known as AND-FBDDs. Finally we show how these imply exponential lower bounds for natural problems associated with probabilistic databases.
  • We consider time-space tradeoffs for exactly computing frequency moments and order statistics over sliding windows. Given an input of length 2n-1, the task is to output the function of each window of length n, giving n outputs in total. Computations over sliding windows are related to direct sum problems except that inputs to instances almost completely overlap. We show an average case and randomized time-space tradeoff lower bound of TS in Omega(n^2) for multi-way branching programs, and hence standard RAM and word-RAM models, to compute the number of distinct elements, F_0, in sliding windows over alphabet [n]. The same lower bound holds for computing the low-order bit of F_0 and computing any frequency moment F_k for k not equal to 1. We complement this lower bound with a TS in \tilde O(n^2) deterministic RAM algorithm for exactly computing F_k in sliding windows. We show time-space separations between the complexity of sliding-window element distinctness and that of sliding-window $F_0\bmod 2$ computation. In particular for alphabet [n] there is a very simple errorless sliding-window algorithm for element distinctness that runs in O(n) time on average and uses O(log{n}) space. We show that any algorithm for a single element distinctness instance can be extended to an algorithm for the sliding-window version of element distinctness with at most a polylogarithmic increase in the time-space product. Finally, we show that the sliding-window computation of order statistics such as the maximum and minimum can be computed with only a logarithmic increase in time, but that a TS in Omega(n^2) lower bound holds for sliding-window computation of order statistics such as the median, a nearly linear increase in time when space is small.
  • We derive new time-space tradeoff lower bounds and algorithms for exactly computing statistics of input data, including frequency moments, element distinctness, and order statistics, that are simple to calculate for sorted data. We develop a randomized algorithm for the element distinctness problem whose time T and space S satisfy T in O (n^{3/2}/S^{1/2}), smaller than previous lower bounds for comparison-based algorithms, showing that element distinctness is strictly easier than sorting for randomized branching programs. This algorithm is based on a new time and space efficient algorithm for finding all collisions of a function f from a finite set to itself that are reachable by iterating f from a given set of starting points. We further show that our element distinctness algorithm can be extended at only a polylogarithmic factor cost to solve the element distinctness problem over sliding windows, where the task is to take an input of length 2n-1 and produce an output for each window of length n, giving n outputs in total. In contrast, we show a time-space tradeoff lower bound of T in Omega(n^2/S) for randomized branching programs to compute the number of distinct elements over sliding windows. The same lower bound holds for computing the low-order bit of F_0 and computing any frequency moment F_k, k neq 1. This shows that those frequency moments and the decision problem F_0 mod 2 are strictly harder than element distinctness. We complement this lower bound with a T in O(n^2/S) comparison-based deterministic RAM algorithm for exactly computing F_k over sliding windows, nearly matching both our lower bound for the sliding-window version and the comparison-based lower bounds for the single-window version. We further exhibit a quantum algorithm for F_0 over sliding windows with T in O(n^{3/2}/S^{1/2}). Finally, we consider the computations of order statistics over sliding windows.
  • We consider the problem of computing a relational query $q$ on a large input database of size $n$, using a large number $p$ of servers. The computation is performed in rounds, and each server can receive only $O(n/p^{1-\varepsilon})$ bits of data, where $\varepsilon \in [0,1]$ is a parameter that controls replication. We examine how many global communication steps are needed to compute $q$. We establish both lower and upper bounds, in two settings. For a single round of communication, we give lower bounds in the strongest possible model, where arbitrary bits may be exchanged; we show that any algorithm requires $\varepsilon \geq 1-1/\tau^*$, where $\tau^*$ is the fractional vertex cover of the hypergraph of $q$. We also give an algorithm that matches the lower bound for a specific class of databases. For multiple rounds of communication, we present lower bounds in a model where routing decisions for a tuple are tuple-based. We show that for the class of tree-like queries there exists a tradeoff between the number of rounds and the space exponent $\varepsilon$. The lower bounds for multiple rounds are the first of their kind. Our results also imply that transitive closure cannot be computed in O(1) rounds of communication.
  • We show that any quantum algorithm deciding whether an input function $f$ from $[n]$ to $[n]$ is 2-to-1 or almost 2-to-1 requires $\Theta(n)$ queries to $f$. The same lower bound holds for determining whether or not a function $f$ from $[2n-2]$ to $[n]$ is surjective. These results yield a nearly linear $\Omega(n/\log n)$ lower bound on the quantum query complexity of $\cl{AC}^0$. The best previous lower bound known for any $\cl{AC^0}$ function was the $\Omega ((n/\log n)^{2/3})$ bound given by Aaronson and Shi's $\Omega(n^{2/3})$ lower bound for the element distinctness problem.
  • We present a general method for converting any family of unsatisfiable CNF formulas that is hard for one of the simplest proof systems, tree resolution, into formulas that require large rank in any proof system that manipulates polynomials or polynomial threshold functions of degree at most k (known as Th(k) proofs). Such systems include Lovasz-Schrijver and Cutting Planes proof systems as well as their high degree analogues. These are based on analyzing two new proof systems, denoted by T^cc(k) and R^cc(k). The proof lines of T^cc(k) are arbitrary Boolean functions, each of which can be evaluated by an efficient k-party randomized communication protocol. They include Th{k-1} proofs as a special case. R^cc(k) proofs are stronger and only require that each inference be locally checkable by an efficient k-party randomized communication protocol. Our main results are the following: (1) When k is O(loglogn), for any unsatisfiable CNF formula F requiring resolution rank r, there is a related CNF formula G=Lift_k(F) requiring refutation rank r^Omega(1/k) log^O(1) n in all R^cc(k) systems. (2) There are strict hierarchies for T^cc(k) and R^cc(k) systems with respect to k when k is O(loglogn in that there are unsatisfiable CNF formulas requiring large rank R^cc(k) refutations but having log^O(1) n rank Th(k) refutations. (3) When k is O(loglogn) there are 2^(n^Omega(1/k)) lower bounds on the size of tree-like T^cc(k) refutations for large classes of lifted CNF formulas. (4) A general method for producing integrality gaps for low rank R^cc(2) inference (and hence Cutting Planes and Th(1) inference) based on related gaps for low rank resolution. These gaps are optimal for MAX-2t-SAT.
  • The sequence a_1,...,a_m is a common subsequence in the set of permutations S = {p_1,...,p_k} on [n] if it is a subsequence of p_i(1),...,p_i(n) and p_j(1),...,p_j(n) for some distinct p_i, p_j in S. Recently, Beame and Huynh-Ngoc (2008) showed that when k>=3, every set of k permutations on [n] has a common subsequence of length at least n^{1/3}. We show that, surprisingly, this lower bound is asymptotically optimal for all constant values of k. Specifically, we show that for any k>=3 and n>=k^2 there exists a set of k permutations on [n] in which the longest common subsequence has length at most 32(kn)^{1/3}. The proof of the upper bound is constructive, and uses elementary algebraic techniques.