• An interesting question about ultracool dwarfs recently raised in the literature is whether their emission is purely internally driven or partially powered by external processes similar to planetary aurora known from the solar system. In this work we present Hubble Space Telescope observations of the energy fluxes of the M8.5 ultracool dwarf LSR J1835+3259 throughout the UV. The obtained spectra reveal that the object is generally UV-fainter compared to other earlier-type dwarfs. We detect the \ion{Mg}{2} doublet at 2800 \A and constrain an average flux throughout the Near-UV. In the Far-UV without Lyman alpha, the ultracool dwarf is extremely faint with an energy output at least a factor of 1000 smaller as expected from auroral emission physically similar to that on Jupiter. We also detect the red wing of the Lyman alpha emission. Our overall finding is that the observed UV spectrum of LSR J1835+3259 resembles the spectrum of mid/late-type M-dwarf stars relatively well, but it is distinct from a spectrum expected from Jupiter-like auroral processes.
  • Since its launch in 1990, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has served as a platform with unique capabilities for remote observations of comets in the far-ultraviolet region of the spectrum. Successive generations of imagers and spectrographs have seen large advances in sensitivity and spectral resolution enabling observations of the diverse properties of a representative number of comets during the past 25 years. To date, four comets have been observed in the far-ultraviolet by the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS), the last spectrograph to be installed in HST, in 2009: 103P/Hartley 2, C/2009 P1 (Garradd), C/2012 S1 (ISON), and C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy). COS has unprecedented sensitivity, but limited spatial information in its 2.5 arcsec diameter circular aperture, and our objective was to determine the CO production rates from measurements of the CO Fourth Positive system in the spectral range of 1400 to 1700 A. In the two brightest comets, nineteen bands of this system were clearly identified. The water production rates were derived from nearly concurrent observations of the OH (0,0) band at 3085 A by the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The derived CO/H2O production rate ratio ranged from ~0.3% for Hartley 2 to ~22% for Garradd. In addition, strong partially resolved emission features due to multiplets of S I, centered at 1429 A and 1479 A, and of C I at 1561 A and 1657 A, were observed in all four comets. Weak emission from several lines of the H2 Lyman band system, excited by solar Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta pumped fluorescence, were detected in comet Lovejoy.
  • We have detected H$_2$O and O$_2$ absorption against the far-UV continuum of stars located on lines of sight near the nucleus of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko using the Alice imaging spectrograph on Rosetta. These stellar appulses occurred at impact parameters of $\rho=4$-20 km, and heliocentric distances ranging from $R_h=-1.8$ to 2.3 AU (negative values indicate pre-perihelion observations). The measured H$_2$O column densities agree well with nearly contemporaneous values measured by VIRTIS-H. The clear detection of O$_2$ independently confirms the initial detection by the ROSINA mass spectrometer; however, the relative abundance of O$_2$/H$_2$O derived from the stellar spectra (11%-68%, with a median value of 25%) is considerably larger than published values found by ROSINA. The cause of this difference is unclear, but potentially related to ROSINA measuring number density at the spacecraft position while Alice measures column density along a line of sight that passes near the nucleus.
  • We have used the unique far-UV imaging capability offered by a sounding rocket borne instrument to acquire observations of C/2012 S1 (ISON) when its angular separation with respect to the sun was 26.3deg, on 2013 November 20.49. At the time of observation the comet's heliocentric distance and velocity relative to the sun were rh = 0.43 AU and rh_dot = -62.7 km s^-1. Images dominated by C I 1657 A and H I 1216 A were acquired over a 1e6 x 1e6 km^2 region. The water production rate implied by the Lyman alpha observations is constrained to be Q_H2O approximately 8e29 s^-1 while the neutral carbon production rate was Q_C approximately 4e28 s^-1. The radial profile of C I was consistent with it being a dissociation product of a parent molecule with a lifetime approximately 5e4 seconds, favoring a parent other than CO. We constrain the Q_CO production rate to 5(+1.5, -7.5)e28 s^-1 with 1sigma errors derived from photon statistics. The upper limit on the Q_CO/Q_H2O < 6%.
  • Alice is a far-ultraviolet imaging spectrograph onboard Rosetta that, amongst multiple objectives, is designed to observe emissions from various atomic and molecular species from within the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The initial observations, made following orbit insertion in August 2014, showed emissions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen spatially localized close to the nucleus and attributed to photoelectron impact dissociation of H2O vapor. Weaker emissions from atomic carbon were subsequently detected and also attributed to electron impact dissociation, of CO2, the relative H I and C I line intensities reflecting the variation of CO2 to H2O column abundance along the line-of-sight through the coma. Beginning in mid-April 2015, Alice sporadically observed a number of outbursts above the sunward limb characterized by sudden increases in the atomic emissions, particularly the semi-forbidden O I 1356 multiplet, over a period of 10-30 minutes, without a corresponding enhancement in long wavelength solar reflected light characteristic of dust production. A large increase in the brightness ratio O I 1356/O I 1304 suggests O2 as the principal source of the additional gas. These outbursts do not correlate with any of the visible images of outbursts taken with either OSIRIS or the navigation camera. Beginning in June 2015 the nature of the Alice spectrum changed considerably with CO Fourth Positive band emission observed continuously, varying with pointing but otherwise fairly constant in time. However, CO does not appear to be a major driver of any of the observed outbursts.
  • Aims. The Alice far-ultraviolet spectrograph onboard Rosetta is designed to observe emissions from various atomic and molecular species from within the coma of comet 67P/ Churyumov-Gerasimenko and to determine their spatial distribution and evolution with time and heliocentric distance. Methods. Following orbit insertion in August 2014, Alice made observations of the inner coma above the limbs of the nucleus of the comet from cometocentric distances varying between 10 and 80 km. Depending on the position and orientation of the slit relative to the nucleus, emissions of atomic hydrogen and oxygen were initially detected. These emissions are spatially localized close to the nucleus and spatially variable with a strong enhancement above the comet's neck at northern latitudes. Weaker emission from atomic carbon and CO were subsequently detected. Results. Analysis of the relative line intensities suggests photoelectron impact dissociation of H2O vapor as the source of the observed H I and O I emissions. The electrons are produced by photoionization of H2O. The observed C I emissions are also attributed to electron impact dissociation, of CO2, and their relative brightness to H I reflects the variation of CO2 to H2O column abundance in the coma.
  • We present the design and performance of the multi-object fiber spectrographs for the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and their upgrade for the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Originally commissioned in Fall 1999 on the 2.5-m aperture Sloan Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, the spectrographs produced more than 1.5 million spectra for the SDSS and SDSS-II surveys, enabling a wide variety of Galactic and extra-galactic science including the first observation of baryon acoustic oscillations in 2005. The spectrographs were upgraded in 2009 and are currently in use for BOSS, the flagship survey of the third-generation SDSS-III project. BOSS will measure redshifts of 1.35 million massive galaxies to redshift 0.7 and Lyman-alpha absorption of 160,000 high redshift quasars over 10,000 square degrees of sky, making percent level measurements of the absolute cosmic distance scale of the Universe and placing tight constraints on the equation of state of dark energy. The twin multi-object fiber spectrographs utilize a simple optical layout with reflective collimators, gratings, all-refractive cameras, and state-of-the-art CCD detectors to produce hundreds of spectra simultaneously in two channels over a bandpass covering the near ultraviolet to the near infrared, with a resolving power R = \lambda/FWHM ~ 2000. Building on proven heritage, the spectrographs were upgraded for BOSS with volume-phase holographic gratings and modern CCD detectors, improving the peak throughput by nearly a factor of two, extending the bandpass to cover 360 < \lambda < 1000 nm, and increasing the number of fibers from 640 to 1000 per exposure. In this paper we describe the original SDSS spectrograph design and the upgrades implemented for BOSS, and document the predicted and measured performances.
  • We report observations of the lunar helium exosphere made between December 29, 2011, and January 26, 2012, with the Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) ultraviolet spectrograph on NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Mission (LRO). The observations were made of resonantly scattered He I 584 from illuminated atmosphere against the dark lunar surface on the dawn side of the terminator. We find no or little variation of the derived surface He density with latitude but day-to-day variations that likely reflect variations in the solar wind alpha flux. The 5-day passage of the Moon through the Earth's magnetotail results in a factor of two decrease in surface density, which is well explained by model simulations.
  • The European Space Agency's Rosetta spacecraft, en route to a 2014 encounter with comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, made a gravity assist swing-by of Mars on 25 February 2007, closest approach being at 01:54UT. The Alice instrument on board Rosetta, a lightweight far-ultraviolet imaging spectrograph optimized for in situ cometary spectroscopy in the 750-2000 A spectral band, was used to study the daytime Mars upper atmosphere including emissions from exospheric hydrogen and oxygen. Offset pointing, obtained five hours before closest approach, enabled us to detect and map the HI Lyman-alpha and Lyman-beta emissions from exospheric hydrogen out beyond 30,000 km from the planet's center. These data are fit with a Chamberlain exospheric model from which we derive the hydrogen density at the 200 km exobase and the H escape flux. The results are comparable to those found from the the Ultraviolet Spectrometer experiment on the Mariner 6 and 7 fly-bys of Mars in 1969. Atomic oxygen emission at 1304 A is detected at altitudes of 400 to 1000 km above the limb during limb scans shortly after closest approach. However, the derived oxygen scale height is not consistent with recent models of oxygen escape based on the production of suprathermal oxygen atoms by the dissociative recombination of O2+.
  • We report results of a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) campaign with the Advanced Camera for Surveys to observe Europa at eastern elongation, i.e. Europa's leading side, on 2008 June 29. With five consecutive HST orbits, we constrain Europa's atmospheric \ion{O}{1} 1304 \A and \ion{O}{1} 1356 \A emissions using the prism PR130L. The total emissions of both oxygen multiplets range between 132 $\pm$ 14 and 226 $\pm$ 14 Rayleigh. An additional systematic error with values on the same order as the statistical errors may be due to uncertainties in modelling the reflected light from Europa's surface. The total emission also shows a clear dependence of Europa's position with respect to Jupiter's magnetospheric plasma sheet. We derive a lower limit for the O$_2$ column density of 6 $\times$ 10$^{18}$ m$^{-2}$. Previous observations of Europa's atmosphere with STIS in 1999 of Europa's trailing side show an enigmatic surplus of radiation on the anti-Jovian side within the disk of Europa. With emission from a radially symmetric atmosphere as a reference, we searched for an anti-Jovian vs sub-Jovian asymmetry with respect to the central meridian on the leading side, and found none. Likewise, we searched for departures from a radially symmetric atmospheric emission and found an emission surplus centered around 90 degree west longitude, for which plausible mechanisms exist. Previous work about the possibility of plumes on Europa due to tidally-driven shear heating found longitudes with strongest local strain rates which might be consistent with the longitudes of maximum UV emissions. Alternatively, asymmetries in Europa's UV emission can also be caused by inhomogeneous surface properties, inhomogeneous solar illuminations, and/or by Europa's complex plasma interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere.
  • Partial frequency redistribution (PRD), describing the formation of the line profile, has negligible observational effects for optical depths smaller than ~10^3, at the resolving power of most current instruments. However, when the spectral resolution is sufficiently high, PRD modeling becomes essential in interpreting the line shapes and determining the total line fluxes. We demonstrate the effects of PRD on the H_2 line profiles observed at high spectral resolution by the Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn. In these spectra, the asymmetric shapes of the lines in the Lyman (v"- 6) progression pumped by the solar Ly-beta are explained by coherent scattering of the photons in the line wings. We introduce a simple computational approximation to mitigate the numerical difficulties of radiative transfer with PRD, and show that it reproduces the exact radiative transfer solution to better than 10%. The lines predicted by our radiative transfer model with PRD, including the H_2 density and temperature distribution as a function of height in the atmosphere, are in agreement with the line profiles observed by FUSE. We discuss the observational consequences of PRD, and show that this computational method also allows us to include PRD in modeling the continuum pumped H_2 fluorescence, treating about 4000 lines simultaneously.
  • We present a measurement of the lifetime of ground state atomic carbon, C(^3P), against ionization processes in interplanetary space and compare it to the lifetime expected from the dominant physical processes likely to occur in this medium. Our measurement is based on analysis of a far ultraviolet (FUV) image of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) recorded by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) on 2005 March 1. The bright CI 1561 A and 1657 A multiplets dominate the GALEX FUV band. We used the image to create high S/N radial profiles that extended beyond one million km from the comet nucleus. Our measurements yielded a total carbon lifetime of 7.1 -- 9.6 x 10^5 s (scaled to 1 AU). Which compares favorably to calculations assuming solar photoionization, solar wind proton change exchange and solar wind electron impact ionization are the dominant processes occurring in this medium and that comet Machholz was embedded in the slow solar wind. The shape of the CI profiles inside 3x10^5 km suggests that either the CO lifetime is shorter than previously thought and/or a shorter-lived carbon-bearing parent molecule, such as CH_4 is providing the majority of the carbon in this region of the coma of comet Machholz.
  • Improvements in the precision of the astrophysical flux scale are needed to answer fundamental scientific questions ranging from cosmology to stellar physics. The unexpected discovery that the expansion of the universe is accelerating was based upon the measurement of astrophysical standard candles that appeared fainter than expected. To characterize the underlying physical mechanism of the "Dark Energy" responsible for this phenomenon requires an improvement in the visible-NIR flux calibration of astrophysical sources to 1% precision. These improvements will also enable large surveys of white dwarf stars, e.g. GAIA, to advance stellar astrophysics by testing and providing constraints for the mass-radius relationship of these stars. ACCESS (Absolute Color Calibration Experiment for Standard Stars) is a rocket-borne payload that will enable the transfer of absolute laboratory detector standards from NIST to a network of stellar standards with a calibration accuracy of 1% and a spectral resolving power of R = 500 across the 0.35-1.7 micron bandpass. Among the strategies being employed to minimize calibration uncertainties are: (1) judicious selection of standard stars (previous calibration heritage, minimal spectral features, robust stellar atmosphere models), (2) execution of observations above the Earth's atmosphere (eliminates atmospheric contamination of the stellar spectrum), (3) a single optical path and detector (to minimize visible to NIR cross-calibration uncertainties), (4) establishment of an a priori error budget, (5) on-board monitoring of instrument performance, and (6) fitting stellar atmosphere models to the data to search for discrepancies and confirm performance.
  • GALEX observations of comet 9P/Tempel 1 using the near ultraviolet (NUV) objective grism were made before, during and after the Deep Impact event that occurred on 2005 July 4 at 05:52:03 UT when a 370 kg NASA spacecraft was maneuvered into the path of the comet. The NUV channel provides usable spectral information in a bandpass covering 2000 - 3400 A with a point source spectral resolving power of approximately 100. The primary spectral features in this range include solar continuum scattered from cometary dust and emissions from OH and CS molecular bands centered near 3085 and 2575 A, respectively. In particular, we report the only cometary CS emission detected during this event. The observations allow the evolution of these spectral features to be tracked over the period of the encounter. In general, the NUV emissions observed from Tempel 1 are much fainter than those that have been observed by GALEX from other comets. However, it is possible to derive production rates for the parent molecules of the species detected by GALEX in Tempel 1 and to determine the number of these molecules liberated by the impact. The derived quiescent production rates are Q(H2O) = 6.4e27 molecules/s and Q(CS2) = 6.7e24 molecules/s, while the impact produced an additional 1.6e32 H2O molecules and 1.3e29 CS2 molecules, a similar ratio as in quiescent outgassing.
  • Observations of four comets made with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer show the rotational envelope of the (0,0) band of the CO Hopfield-Birge system (C - X) at 1088 A to consist of both "cold" and "hot" components, the "cold" component accounting for ~75% of the flux and with a rotational temperature in the range 55-75 K. We identify the "hot" component as coming from the dissociation of CO2 into rotationally "hot" CO, with electron impact dissociation probably dominant over photodissociation near the nucleus. An additional weak, broad satellite band is seen centered near the position of the P(40) line that we attribute to CO fluorescence from a non-thermal high J rotational population produced by photodissociation of formaldehyde into CO and H2. This process also leaves the H2 preferentially populated in excited vibrational levels which are identified by fluorescent H2 lines in the spectrum excited by solar OVI 1031.9 and solar Lyman-alpha. The amount of H2 produced by H2CO dissociation is comparable to the amount produced by photodissociation of H2O. Electron impact excitation of CO, rather than resonance fluorescence, appears to be the primary source of the observed (B - X) (0,0) band at 1151 A.
  • We explore the design of a space mission, Project Lyman, which has the goal of quantifying the ionization history of the universe from the present epoch to a redshift of z ~ 3. Observations from WMAP and SDSS show that before a redshift of z >~ 6 the first collapsed objects, possibly dwarf galaxies, emitted Lyman continuum (LyC) radiation shortward of 912 A, reionizing most of the universe. How LyC escapes from galactic environments, whether it induces positive or negative feedback on the local and global collapse of structures, and the role played by clumping, molecules, metallicity and dust are major unanswered theoretical questions, requiring observational constraint. Numerous intervening Lyman limit systems, which frustrate the detection of LyC from high z objects, thin below z ~ 3 where there are a few objects with apparently very high fesc. At low z there are only controversial detections and a handful of upper limits. A wide-field multi-object spectroscopic survey with moderate spectral and spatial resolution can quantify fesc within diverse spatially resolved galactic environments over redshifts with significant evolution in galaxy assemblage and quasar activity. It can also calibrate LyC escape against Ly-alpha escape, providing an essential tool to JWST for probing the beginnings of reionization. We present calculations showing the evolution of the characteristic apparent magnitude of star-forming galaxy luminosity functions at 900 A, as a function of redshift and assumed escape fraction to determine the required aperture for detecting LyC. We review our efforts to build a pathfinding dual order multi-object spectro/telescope with a (0.5deg)^2 field-of-view, using a GSFC microshutter array, and crossed delay-line micro-channel plate detector.
  • We present a preliminary calibration and flight performance of the Long-Slit Imaging Dual Order Spectrograph (LIDOS), a rocket-borne instrument with a large dynamic range in the 900 - 1700A bandpass. The instrument observes UV-bright objects with a CCD channel and fainter nebulosity with an MCP detector. The image quality and the detector quantum efficiencies were determined using the calibration and test equipment at the Johns Hopkins University, and further monitored using an on-board electron-impact calibration lamp. We review results from each of the three flights of the instrument.
  • The rich structure of the Fourth Positive System (A-X) of carbon monoxide accounts for many of the spectral features seen in long slit HST-STIS observations of comets 153P/Ikeya-Zhang, C/2001 Q4 (NEAT), and C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), as well as in the HST-GHRS spectrum of comet C/1996 B2 Hyakutake. A detailed CO fluorescence model is developed to derive the CO abundances in these comets by simultaneously fitting all of the observed A-X bands. The model includes the latest values for the oscillator strengths and state parameters, and accounts for optical depth effects due to line overlap and self-absorption. The model fits yield radial profiles of CO column density that are consistent with a predominantly native source for all the comets observed by STIS. The derived CO abundances relative to water in these comets span a wide range, from 0.44% for C/2000 WM1 (LINEAR), 7.2% for 153P/Ikeya-Zhang, 8.8% for C/2001 Q4 (NEAT) to 20.9% for C/1996 B2 (Hyakutake). The subtraction of the CO spectral features using this model leads to the first identification of a molecular hydrogen line pumped by solar HI Lyman-beta longward of 1200A in the spectrum of comet 153P/Ikeya-Zhang. (Abridged)
  • High resolution spectroscopy with FUSE and STIS of atomic and molecular velocity stratification in the nebular outflow of M27 challenge models for the abundance kinematics in planetary nebulae. The simple picture of a very high speed (~ 1000 km/s), high ionization, radiation driven stellar wind surrounded by a slower (~ 10 km/s) mostly molecular outflow, with low ionization and neutral atomic species residing at the wind interaction interface, is not supported... We find ...there is a fast (33 -- 65 km/s) low ionization zone, surrounding a slower (<~ 33 km/s) high ionization zone and, at the transition velocity (33 km/s), vibrationally excited H_2 is intermixed with a predominately neutral atomic medium... Far-UV continuum fluorescence of H_2 is not detected, but Lyman alpha (Lya) fluorescence is present. The diffuse nebular medium is inhospitable to molecules and dust. Maintaining the modest equilibrium abundance of H_2 (N(H_2)/N(HI) << 1) in the diffuse nebular medium requires a source of H_2, mostly likely the clumpy nebular medium. The stellar SED shows no signs of reddening (E(B-V) < 0.01), but paradoxically measurements of Ha/Hb ... indicate E(B-V) ~ 0.1. ...the apparent enhancement of Ha/Hb in the absence of dust may result from a two step process of H_2 ionization by Lyman continuum (Lyc) photons followed by dissociative recombination (H_2 + gamma -> H_2^+ + e -> H(1s) + H (nl)), which ultimately produces fluorescence of Ha and Lya. In the optically thin limit at the inferred radius of the velocity transition we find dissociation of H_2 by stellar Lyc photons is an order of magnitude more efficient than spontaneous dissociation by far-UV photons. We suggest that the importance of this H_2 destruction process in HII regions has been overlooked.
  • We report on spectroscopic observations of periodic comet 9P/Tempel 1 by the Alice ultraviolet spectrograph on the Rosetta spacecraft in conjunction with NASA's Deep Impact mission. Our objectives were to measure an increase in atomic and molecular emissions produced by the excavation of volatile sub-surface material. We unambiguously detected atomic oxygen emission from the quiescent coma but no enhancement at the 10% (1-sigma) level following the impact. We derive a quiescent water production rate of 9 x 10^27 molecules per second with an estimated uncertainty of 30%. Our upper limits to the volatiles produced by the impact are consistent with other estimates.
  • We report on the Hubble Space Telescope program to observe periodic comet 9P/Tempel 1 in conjunction with NASA's Deep Impact mission. Our objectives were to study the generation and evolution of the coma resulting from the impact and to obtain wide-band images of the visual outburst generated by the impact. Two observing campaigns utilizing a total of 17 HST orbits were carried out: the first occurred on 2005 June 13-14 and fortuitously recorded the appearance of a new, short-lived fan in the sunward direction on June 14. The principal campaign began two days before impact and was followed by contiguous orbits through impact plus several hours and then snapshots one, seven, and twelve days later. All of the observations were made using the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). For imaging, the ACS High Resolution Channel (HRC) provides a spatial resolution of 36 km (16 km/pixel) at the comet at the time of impact. Baseline images of the comet, made prior to impact, photometrically resolved the comet's nucleus. The derived diameter, 6.1 km, is in excellent agreement with the 6.0 +/- 0.2 km diameter derived from the spacecraft imagers. Following the impact, the HRC images illustrate the temporal and spatial evolution of the ejecta cloud and allow for a determination of its expansion velocity distribution. One day after impact the ejecta cloud had passed out of the field-of-view of the HRC.
  • One of the goals of the Hubble Space Telescope program to observe periodic comet 9P/Tempel 1 in conjunction with NASA's Deep Impact mission was to study the generation and evolution of the gaseous coma resulting from the impact. For this purpose, the Solar Blind Channel of the Advanced Camera for Surveys was used with the F140LP filter which is sensitive primarily to the ultraviolet emission (>1400 A) from the CO Fourth Positive system. Following the impact we detected an increase in brightness, which if all due to CO corresponds to 1.5 x 10^31 molecules or a mass of 6.6 x 10^5 kg, an amount that would normally be produced by 7-10 hours of quiescent outgassing from the comet. This number is less than or equal to 10% of the number of water molecules excavated, and suggests that the volatile content of the material excavated by the impact did not differ significantly from the surface or near sub-surface material responsible for the quiescent outgassing of the comet.
  • The edge-on disk surrounding the nearby young star Beta Pictoris is the archetype of the "debris disks", which are composed of dust and gas produced by collisions and evaporation of planetesimals, analogues of Solar System comets and asteroids. These disks provide a window on the formation and early evolution of terrestrial planets. Previous observations of Beta Pic concluded that the disk gas has roughly solar abundances of elements [1], but this poses a problem because such gas should be rapidly blown away from the star, contrary to observations of a stable gas disk in Keplerian rotation [1, 2]. Here we report the detection of singly and doubly ionized carbon (CII, CIII) and neutral atomic oxygen (OI) gas in the Beta Pic disk; measurement of these abundant volatile species permits a much more complete gas inventory. Carbon is extremely overabundant relative to every other measured element. This appears to solve the problem of the stable gas disk, since the carbon overabundance should keep the gas disk in Keplerian rotation [3]. New questions arise, however, since the overabundance may indicate the gas is produced from material more carbon-rich than the expected Solar System analogues.
  • The disk around AU Microscopii, an M1 star in the Beta Pictoris Moving Group, is extraordinarily well-suited for comparison to the Beta Pic debris disk (type A5V). We use far-UV absorption spectroscopy of AU Mic to probe its edge-on disk for small amounts of molecular hydrogen, the primary constituent of gas giant planets. Our conservative upper limit on the line-of-sight H_2 column density is 1.7 x 10^{19} cm^{-2}, which is 18.5 times lower than the limit obtained from non-detection of sub-mm CO emission (Liu et al. 2004). In addition, there is a hint of H_2 absorption at a column density an order of magnitude or more below our upper limit. The H_2-to-dust ratio in the AU Mic disk is < 6:1, similar to that in the Beta Pic disk. This shows that the primordial gas has largely been dissipated in less than about 12 Myr for both disks, despite their very different stellar masses and luminosities. It is extremely difficult to form a giant planet around AU Mic with current core-accretion scenarios in such a short time.
  • Shull et al. (1999) have asserted that the contribution of stars, relative to quasars, to the metagalactic background radiation that ionizes most of the baryons in the universe remains almost completely unknown at all epochs. The potential to directly quantify this contribution at low redshift has recently become possible with the identification by GALEX of large numbers of sparsely distributed faint ultraviolet galaxies. Neither STIS nor FUSE nor GALEX have the ability to efficiently survey these sparse fields and directly measure the Lyman continuum radiation that may leak into the low redshift (z < 0.4) intergalactic medium. We present here a design for a new type of far ultraviolet spectrograph, one that is more sensitive, covers wider fields, and can provide spectra and images of a large number of objects simultaneously, called the Far-ultraviolet Off Rowland-circle Telescope for Imaging and Spectroscopy (FORTIS). We intend to use a sounding rocket flight to validate the new instrument with a simple long-slit observation of the starburst populations in the galaxy M83. If however, the long-slit were replaced with microshutter array, this design could isolate the chains of blue galaxies found by GALEX over an ~30' diameter field-of-view and directly address the Lyman continuum problem in a long duration orbital mission. Thus, our development of the sounding rocket instrument is a pathfinder to a new wide field spectroscopic technology for enabling the potential discovery of the long hypothesized but elusive Lyman continuum radiation that is thought to leak from low redshift galaxies and contribute to the ionization of the universe.