• Graphene oxide can be used as a precursor to graphene but the quality of graphene flakes is highly heterogeneous. Scanning-Raman-Microscopy (SRM) is used to characterize films of graphene derived from flakes of graphene oxide with an almost intact carbon framework (ai-GO). The defect density of these flakes is visualized in detail by analyzing the intensity and full-width at half-maximum of the most pronounced Raman peaks. In addition, we superimpose the SRM results with AFM images and correlate the spectroscopic results with the morphology. Furthermore, we use SRM technique to display the amount of defects in a film of graphene. Thus, an area of 250 x 250 {\my}m2 of graphene is probed with a step-size increment of 1 {\mu}m. We are able to visualize the position of graphene flakes, edges and the substrate. Finally, we alter parameters of measurement to analyze the quality of graphene fast and reliable. The described method can be used to probe and visualize the quality of graphene films.
  • Measuring the average refractive index (RI) of spherical objects, such as suspended cells, in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) requires a decoupling of RI and size from the QPI data. This has been commonly achieved by determining the object's radius with geometrical approaches, neglecting light-scattering. Here, we present a novel QPI fitting algorithm that reliably uncouples the RI using Mie theory and a semi-analytical, corrected Rytov approach. We assess the range of validity of this algorithm in silico and experimentally investigate various objects (oil and protein droplets, microgel beads, cells) and noise conditions. In addition, we provide important practical cues for future studies in cell biology.
  • In this chapter, we introduce digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a marker-free method to determine the refractive index of single, spherical cells in suspension. The refractive index is a conclusive measure in a biological context. Cell conditions, such as differentiation or infection, are known to yield significant changes in the refractive index. Furthermore, the refractive index of biological tissue determines the way it interacts with light. Besides the biological relevance of this interaction in the retina, a lot of methods used in biology, including microscopy, rely on light-tissue or light-cell interactions. Hence, determining the refractive index of cells using DHM is valuable in many biological applications. This chapter covers the main topics which are important for the implementation of DHM: setup, sample preparation and analysis. First, the optical setup is described in detail including notes and suggestions for the implementation. Following that, a protocol for the sample and measurement preparation is explained. In the analysis section, an algorithm for the determination of the quantitative phase map is described. Subsequently, all intermediate steps for the calculation of the refractive index of suspended cells are presented, exploiting their spherical shape. In the last section, a discussion of possible extensions to the setup, further measurement configurations and additional analysis methods are given. Throughout this chapter, we describe a simple, robust, and thus easily reproducible implementation of DHM. The different possibilities for extensions show the diverse fields of application for this technique.
  • Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is a tomographic technique that can be used to measure the three-dimensional (3D) refractive index distribution within living cells without the requirement of any marker. In principle, ODT can be regarded as a generalization of optical projection tomography which is equivalent to computerized tomography (CT). Both optical tomographic techniques require projection-phase images of cells measured at multiple angles. However, the reconstruction of the 3D refractive index distribution post-measurement differs for the two techniques. It is known that ODT yields better results than projection tomography, because it takes into account diffraction of the imaging light due to the refractive index structure of the sample. Here, we apply ODT to biological cells in a microfluidic chip which combines optical trapping and microfluidic flow to achieve an optofluidic single-cell rotation. In particular, we address the problem that arises when the trapped cell is not rotating about an axis perpendicular to the imaging plane, but instead about an arbitrarily tilted axis. In this paper we show that the 3D reconstruction can be improved by taking into account such a tilted rotational axis in the reconstruction process.
  • Cells alter the path of light, a fact that leads to well-known aberrations in single cell or tissue imaging. Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) measures the biophysical property that causes these aberrations, the refractive index (RI). ODT is complementary to fluorescence imaging and does not require any markers. The present study introduces RI and fluorescence tomography with optofluidic rotation (RAFTOR) of suspended cells, quantifying the intracellular RI distribution and colocalizing it with fluorescence in 3D. The technique is validated with cell phantoms and used to confirm a lower nuclear RI for HL60 cells. Furthermore, the nuclear inversion of adult mouse photoreceptor cells is observed in the RI distribution. The applications shown confirm predictions of previous studies and illustrate the potential of RAFTOR to improve our understanding of cells and tissues.
  • Despite being originally inspired by the central nervous system, artificial neural networks have diverged from their biological archetypes as they have been remodeled to fit particular tasks. In this paper, we review several possibilites to reverse map these architectures to biologically more realistic spiking networks with the aim of emulating them on fast, low-power neuromorphic hardware. Since many of these devices employ analog components, which cannot be perfectly controlled, finding ways to compensate for the resulting effects represents a key challenge. Here, we discuss three different strategies to address this problem: the addition of auxiliary network components for stabilizing activity, the utilization of inherently robust architectures and a training method for hardware-emulated networks that functions without perfect knowledge of the system's dynamics and parameters. For all three scenarios, we corroborate our theoretical considerations with experimental results on accelerated analog neuromorphic platforms.
  • This paper presents an extension of the BrainScaleS accelerated analog neuromorphic hardware model. The scalable neuromorphic architecture is extended by the support for multi-compartment models and non-linear dendrites. These features are part of a \SI{65}{\nano\meter} prototype ASIC. It allows to emulate different spike types observed in cortical pyramidal neurons: NMDA plateau potentials, calcium and sodium spikes. By replicating some of the structures of these cells, they can be configured to perform coincidence detection within a single neuron. Built-in plasticity mechanisms can modify not only the synaptic weights, but also the dendritic synaptic composition to efficiently train large multi-compartment neurons. Transistor-level simulations demonstrate the functionality of the analog implementation and illustrate analogies to biological measurements.
  • Thermal properties of solid-state materials are a fundamental topic of study with important practical implications. For example, anisotropic displacement parameters (ADPs) are routinely used in physics, chemistry, and crystallography to quantify the thermal motion of atoms in crystals. ADPs are commonly derived from diffraction experiments, but recent developments have also enabled their first-principles prediction using periodic density functional theory (DFT). Here, we combine experiments and dispersion-corrected DFT to quantify lattice thermal expansion and ADPs in crystalline {\alpha}-sulfur (S8), a prototypical elemental solid that is controlled by the interplay of covalent and van der Waals interactions. We first report on single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements that provide new and improved reference data from 10 K up to room temperature. We then use several popular dispersion-corrected DFT methods to predict vibrational and thermal properties of {\alpha}-sulfur, including the anisotropic lattice thermal expansion. Hereafter, ADPs are derived in the commonly used harmonic approximation (in the computed zero-Kelvin structure) and also in the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) which takes the predicted lattice thermal expansion into account. At the PBE+D3(BJ) level, the latter leads to excellent agreement with experiments. Finally, more general implications of this study for realistic materials modeling at finite temperature are discussed.
  • Tomography is the three-dimensional reconstruction of an object from images taken at different angles. The term classical tomography is used, when the imaging beam travels in straight lines through the object. This assumption is valid for light with short wavelengths, for example in x-ray tomography. For classical tomography, a commonly used reconstruction method is the filtered back-projection algorithm which yields fast and stable object reconstructions. In the context of single-cell imaging, the back-projection algorithm has been used to investigate the cell structure or to quantify the refractive index distribution within single cells using light from the visible spectrum. Nevertheless, these approaches, commonly summarized as optical projection tomography, do not take into account diffraction. Diffraction tomography with the Rytov approximation resolves this issue. The explicit incorporation of the wave nature of light results in an enhanced reconstruction of the object's refractive index distribution. Here, we present a full literature review of diffraction tomography. We derive the theory starting from the wave equation and discuss its validity with the focus on applications for refractive index tomography. Furthermore, we derive the back-propagation algorithm, the diffraction-tomographic pendant to the back-projection algorithm, and describe its implementation in three dimensions. Finally, we showcase the application of the back-propagation algorithm to computer-generated scattering data. This review unifies the different notations in literature and gives a detailed description of the back-propagation algorithm, serving as a reliable basis for future work in the field of diffraction tomography.
  • Advancing the size and complexity of neural network models leads to an ever increasing demand for computational resources for their simulation. Neuromorphic devices offer a number of advantages over conventional computing architectures, such as high emulation speed or low power consumption, but this usually comes at the price of reduced configurability and precision. In this article, we investigate the consequences of several such factors that are common to neuromorphic devices, more specifically limited hardware resources, limited parameter configurability and parameter variations. Our final aim is to provide an array of methods for coping with such inevitable distortion mechanisms. As a platform for testing our proposed strategies, we use an executable system specification (ESS) of the BrainScaleS neuromorphic system, which has been designed as a universal emulation back-end for neuroscientific modeling. We address the most essential limitations of this device in detail and study their effects on three prototypical benchmark network models within a well-defined, systematic workflow. For each network model, we start by defining quantifiable functionality measures by which we then assess the effects of typical hardware-specific distortion mechanisms, both in idealized software simulations and on the ESS. For those effects that cause unacceptable deviations from the original network dynamics, we suggest generic compensation mechanisms and demonstrate their effectiveness. Both the suggested workflow and the investigated compensation mechanisms are largely back-end independent and do not require additional hardware configurability beyond the one required to emulate the benchmark networks in the first place. We hereby provide a generic methodological environment for configurable neuromorphic devices that are targeted at emulating large-scale, functional neural networks.
  • In this study, we present a highly configurable neuromorphic computing substrate and use it for emulating several types of neural networks. At the heart of this system lies a mixed-signal chip, with analog implementations of neurons and synapses and digital transmission of action potentials. Major advantages of this emulation device, which has been explicitly designed as a universal neural network emulator, are its inherent parallelism and high acceleration factor compared to conventional computers. Its configurability allows the realization of almost arbitrary network topologies and the use of widely varied neuronal and synaptic parameters. Fixed-pattern noise inherent to analog circuitry is reduced by calibration routines. An integrated development environment allows neuroscientists to operate the device without any prior knowledge of neuromorphic circuit design. As a showcase for the capabilities of the system, we describe the successful emulation of six different neural networks which cover a broad spectrum of both structure and functionality.
  • In this paper we present a methodological framework that meets novel requirements emerging from upcoming types of accelerated and highly configurable neuromorphic hardware systems. We describe in detail a device with 45 million programmable and dynamic synapses that is currently under development, and we sketch the conceptual challenges that arise from taking this platform into operation. More specifically, we aim at the establishment of this neuromorphic system as a flexible and neuroscientifically valuable modeling tool that can be used by non-hardware-experts. We consider various functional aspects to be crucial for this purpose, and we introduce a consistent workflow with detailed descriptions of all involved modules that implement the suggested steps: The integration of the hardware interface into the simulator-independent model description language PyNN; a fully automated translation between the PyNN domain and appropriate hardware configurations; an executable specification of the future neuromorphic system that can be seamlessly integrated into this biology-to-hardware mapping process as a test bench for all software layers and possible hardware design modifications; an evaluation scheme that deploys models from a dedicated benchmark library, compares the results generated by virtual or prototype hardware devices with reference software simulations and analyzes the differences. The integration of these components into one hardware-software workflow provides an ecosystem for ongoing preparative studies that support the hardware design process and represents the basis for the maturity of the model-to-hardware mapping software. The functionality and flexibility of the latter is proven with a variety of experimental results.
  • We present a complete top-down design of a low-power multi-channel clock recovery circuit based on gated current-controlled oscillators. The flow includes several tools and methods used to specify block constraints, to design and verify the topology down to the transistor level, as well as to achieve a power consumption as low as 5mW/Gbit/s. Statistical simulation is used to estimate the achievable bit error rate in presence of phase and frequency errors and to prove the feasibility of the concept. VHDL modeling provides extensive verification of the topology. Thermal noise modeling based on well-known concepts delivers design parameters for the device sizing and biasing. We present two practical examples of possible design improvements analyzed and implemented with this methodology.