• Most Type I superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) reported to date have been identified by their high peak luminosities and spectra lacking obvious signs of hydrogen. We demonstrate that these events can be distinguished from normal-luminosity SNe (including Type Ic events) solely from their spectra over a wide range of light-curve phases. We use this distinction to select 19 SLSNe-I and 4 possible SLSNe-I from the Palomar Transient Factory archive (including 7 previously published objects). We present 127 new spectra of these objects and combine these with 39 previously published spectra, and we use these to discuss the average spectral properties of SLSNe-I at different spectral phases. We find that Mn II most probably contributes to the ultraviolet spectral features after maximum light, and we give a detailed study of the O II features that often characterize the early-time optical spectra of SLSNe-I. We discuss the velocity distribution of O II, finding that for some SLSNe-I this can be confined to a narrow range compared to relatively large systematic velocity shifts. Mg II and Fe II favor higher velocities than O II and C II, and we briefly discuss how this may constrain power-source models. We tentatively group objects by how well they match either SN 2011ke or PTF12dam and discuss the possibility that physically distinct events may have been previously grouped together under the SLSN-I label.
  • Superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) are the most luminous supernovae in the universe. They are found in extreme star-forming galaxies and are probably connected with the death of massive stars. One hallmark of very massive progenitors would be a tendency to explode in very dense, UV-bright, and blue regions. In this paper we investigate the resolved host galaxy properties of two nearby hydrogen-poor SLSNe, PTF~11hrq and PTF~12dam. For both galaxies \textit{Hubble Space Telescope} multi-filter images were obtained. Additionally, we performe integral field spectroscopy of the host galaxy of PTF~11hrq using the Very Large Telescope Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT/MUSE), and investigate the line strength, metallicity and kinematics. Neither PTF~11hrq nor PTF~12dam occurred in the bluest part of their host galaxies, although both galaxies have overall blue UV-to-optical colors. The MUSE data reveal a bright starbursting region in the host of PTF~11hrq, although far from the SN location. The SN exploded close to a region with disturbed kinematics, bluer color, stronger [OIII], and lower metallicity. The host galaxy is likely interacting with a companion. PTF~12dam occurred in one of the brightest pixels, in a starbursting galaxy with a complex morphology and a tidal tail, where interaction is also very likely. We speculate that SLSN explosions may originate from stars generated during star-formation episodes triggered by interaction. High resolution imaging and integral field spectroscopy are fundamental for a better understanding of SLSNe explosion sites and how star formation varies across their host galaxies.
  • We present the light curves of the hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) PTF12dam and iPTF13dcc, discovered by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory. Both show excess emission at early times and a slowly declining light curve at late times. The early bump in PTF12dam is very similar in duration (~10 days) and brightness relative to the main peak (2-3 mag fainter) compared to those observed in other SLSNe-I. In contrast, the long-duration (>30 days) early excess emission in iPTF13dcc, whose brightness competes with that of the main peak, appears to be of a different nature. We construct bolometric light curves for both targets, and fit a variety of light-curve models to both the early bump and main peak in an attempt to understand the nature of these explosions. Even though the slope of the late-time light-curve decline in both SLSNe is suggestively close to that expected from the radioactive decay of $^{56}$Ni and $^{56}$Co, the amount of nickel required to power the full light curves is too large considering the estimated ejecta mass. The magnetar model including an increasing escape fraction provides a reasonable description of the PTF12dam observations. However, neither the basic nor the double-peaked magnetar model is capable of reproducing the iPTF13dcc light curve. A model combining a shock breakout in an extended envelope with late-time magnetar energy injection provides a reasonable fit to the iPTF13dcc observations. Finally, we find that the light curves of both PTF12dam and iPTF13dcc can be adequately fit with the circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model.
  • We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory: iPTF13ajg. At a redshift of z=0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude M(u,AB)=-22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The uBgRiz light curves, obtained with the P48, P60, NOT, DCT, and Keck telescopes, and the nine-epoch spectral sequence secured with the Keck and the VLT (covering 3 rest-frame months), are tied together photometrically to provide an estimate of the flux evolution as a function of time and wavelength. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF13ajg is 3.2x10^44 erg/s, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3x10^51 erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the VLT. From Voigt-profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I)=11.94+-0.06, log N(Mg II)=14.7+-0.3, and log N(Fe II)=14.25+-0.10. These column densities, as well as the Mg I and Mg II equivalent widths of a sample of hydrogen-poor SLSNe taken from the literature, are at the low end of those derived for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), whose progenitors are also thought to be massive stars. This suggests that the environments of SLSNe and GRBs are different. From the nondetection of Fe II fine-structure absorption lines, we derive a strict lower limit on the distance between the supernova and the narrow-line absorbing gas of 50 pc. No host-galaxy emission lines are detected, leading to an upper limit on the unobscured star-formation rate of SFR([OII])<0.07 Msun/yr. Late-time imaging shows the host galaxy of iPTF13ajg to be faint, with g(AB)~27.0 and R(AB)>=26.0 mag, which roughly corresponds to M(B,Vega) >~ -17.7 mag. [abridged]
  • We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ibn (SN 2006jc-like) supernova iPTF13beo. Detected by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory ~3 hours after the estimated first light, iPTF13beo is the youngest and the most distant (~430 Mpc) Type Ibn event ever observed. The iPTF13beo light curve is consistent with light curves of other Type Ibn SNe and with light curves of fast Type Ic events, but with a slightly faster rise-time of two days. In addition, the iPTF13beo R-band light curve exhibits a double-peak structure separated by ~9 days, not observed before in any Type Ibn SN. A low-resolution spectrum taken during the iPTF13beo rising stage is featureless, while a late-time spectrum obtained during the declining stage exhibits narrow and intermediate-width He I and Si II features with FWHM ~ 2000-5000 km/s and is remarkably similar to the prototypical SN Ibn 2006jc spectrum. We suggest that our observations support a model of a massive star exploding in a dense He-rich circumstellar medium (CSM). A shock breakout in a CSM model requires an eruption releasing a total mass of ~0.1 Msun over a time scale of couple of weeks prior to the SN explosion.
  • Unusual extinction curves of high-redshift QSOs have been taken as evidence that dust is primarily produced by supernovae at high redshift. In particular, the 3000 A Todini-Ferrara-Maiolino kink in the extinction curve of the z = 6.20 SDSS J1048+4637 has been attributed to supernova dust. Here we discuss the challenges in inferring robust extinction curves of high-redshift QSOs and critically assess previous claims of detection of supernova dust. In particular, we address the sensitivity to the choice of intrinsic QSO spectrum, the need for a long wavelength baseline, and the drawbacks in fitting theoretical extinction curves. In a sample of 21 QSOs at z ~ 6 we detect significant ultraviolet extinction using existing broad-band optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer photometry. The median extinction curve is consistent with a Small Magellanic Cloud curve with A_1450 ~ 0.7 mag and does not exhibit any conspicuous (restframe) 2175 A or 3000 A features. For two QSOs, SDSS J1044-0125 at z = 5.78 and SDSS J1030+0524 at z = 6.31, we further present X-shooter spectra covering the wavelength range 0.9-2.5 um. The resulting non-parametric extinction curves do not exhibit the 3000 A kink. Finally, in a re-analysis of literature spectra of SDSS J1048+4637, we do not find evidence for a conspicuous kink. We conclude that the existing evidence for a 3000 A feature is weak and that the overall dust properties at high and low redshift show no significant differences. This, however, does not preclude supernovae from dominating the dust budget at high redshift.
  • For Gamma-Ray Burst 100901A, we have obtained Gemini-North and Very Large Telescope optical afterglow spectra at four epochs: one hour, one day, three days and one week after the burst, thanks to the afterglow remaining unusually bright at late times. Apart from a wealth of metal resonance lines, we also detect lines arising from fine-structure levels of the ground state of Fe II, and from metastable levels of Fe II and Ni II at the host redshift (z = 1.4084). These lines are found to vary significantly in time. The combination of the data and modelling results shows that we detect the fall of the Ni II 4 F9/2 metastable level population, which to date has not been observed. Assuming that the population of the excited states is due to the UV-radiation of the afterglow, we estimate an absorber distance of a few hundred pc. This appears to be a typical value when compared to similar studies. We detect two intervening absorbers (z = 1.3147, 1.3179). Despite the wide temporal range of the data, we do not see significant variation in the absorption lines of these two intervening systems.
  • Context: GRB afterglows are excellent probes of gas and dust in star-forming galaxies at all epochs. It has been posited that dust in the early Universe must be different from dust at lower z. To date two reports directly support this contention, one of which is based on the spectral shape of GRB 050904 at z = 6.295. Aims: We reinvestigate the afterglow to understand dust at high z. We address the claimed evidence for unusual (SN-origin) dust in its host galaxy by simultaneously examining the X-ray and optical/NIR spectrophotometric data. Methods: We derive the intrinsic SED of the afterglow at 0.47, 1.25 and 3.4 days, by re-reducing the Swift X-ray data, the 1.25 days FORS2 z-Gunn photometric data, the spectroscopic and z'-band photometric data at ~3 days from the Subaru telescope, as well as the critical UKIRT Z-band photometry at 0.47 days, upon which the claim of dust detection largely relies. Results: We find no evidence of dust extinction in the SED. We compute flux densities at lambda_rest = 1250 AA directly from the observed counts at all epochs. In the earliest epoch, 0.47 days, the Z-band suppression is found to be smaller (0.3 +- 0.2 mag) than previously reported and statistically insignificant (<1.5 sigma). Furthermore we find that the photometry of this band is unstable and difficult to calibrate. Conclusions: From the afterglow SED we demonstrate that there is no evidence for dust extinction -- the SED at all times can be reproduced without dust, and at 1.25 days in particular, significant extinction can be excluded, with A(3000 AA) < 0.27 mag at 95% confidence using the SN-type extinction curve. We conclude that there is no evidence of any extinction in the afterglow of GRB 050904 and that the presence of SN-origin dust in the host of GRB 050904 must be viewed skeptically. [abridged]
  • NGC 2770 has been the host of three supernovae of Type Ib during the last 10 years, SN 1999eh, SN 2007uy and SN 2008D. SN 2008D attracted special attention due to the serendipitous discovery of an associated X-ray transient. In this paper, we study the properties of NGC 2770 and specifically the three SN sites to investigate whether this galaxy is in any way peculiar to cause a high frequency of SNe Ib. We model the global SED of the galaxy from broadband data and derive a star-formation and SN rate comparable to the values of the Milky Way. We further study the galaxy using longslit spectroscopy covering the major axis and the three SN sites. From the spectroscopic study we find subsolar metallicities for the SN sites, a high extinction and a moderate star-formation rate. In a high resolution spectrum, we also detect diffuse interstellar bands in the line-of-sight towards SN 2008. A comparison of NGC 2770 to the global properties of a galaxy sample with high SN occurance (at least 3 SN in the last 100 years) suggests that NGC 2770 is not particularly destined to produce such an enhancement of observed SNe observed. Its properties are also very different from gamma-ray burst host galaxies. Statistical considerations on SN Ib detection rates give a probability of ~1.5% to find a galaxy with three Ib SNe detected in 10 years. The high number of rare Ib SNe in this galaxy is therefore likely to be a coincidence rather than special properties of the galaxy itself. NGC 2770 has a small irregular companion, NGC 2770B, which is highly starforming, has a very low mass and one of the lowest metallicities detected in the nearby universe as derived from longslit spectroscopy. In the most metal poor part, we even detect Wolf-Rayet features, against the current models of WR stars which require high metallicities.
  • We present early (starting 1.6h after the burst) WHT/ISIS optical spectroscopy of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060206 detecting a range of metal absorption lines and their fine-structure transitions. Additional information is provided by the afterglow lightcurve. The resolution and wavelength range of the spectra and the bright afterglow facilitate a detailed study and fitting of the absorption line systems in order to derive column densities. We also use deep imaging to detect the host galaxy and probe the nature of an intervening system at z = 1.48 seen in absorption in the afterglow spectra. We detect four discrete velocity systems in the resonant metal absorption lines, best explained by shells within and/or around the host created by starburst winds. The fine-structure lines have no less than three components with strengths decreasing from the redmost components. We therefore suggest that the fine-structure lines are best explained to be produced by UV pumping from which follows that the redmost component is the one closest to the burst where also NV was detected. The host is detected in deep HST imaging with F814W_AB = 27.48 +- 0.19 mag and a 3 sigma upper limit of H = 20.6 mag (Vega) is achieved. A candidate counterpart for the intervening absorption system is detected as well, which is quite exceptional for an absorber in the sightline towards a GRB afterglow. The intervening system shows no temporal evolution as claimed by Hao et al. (2007) which we prove from our WHT spectra taken before and Subaru spectra taken during the observations from Hao et al.
  • We report on a deep search for CO(J=3-2) line emission from the host galaxy of GRB 980425 with the Atacama Submillimeter Telescope Experiment (ASTE). We observed five points of the galaxy covering the entire region. After combining all of the spectra, we obtained a global spectrum with the rms noise level of 3.3 mK in T_mb scale at a velocity resolution of 10 km s^-1. No significant emission was detected, though we find a marginal emission feature in the velocity range corresponding to the redshift of the galaxy. We derive 3 sigma upper limits on the global properties: the velocity-integrated CO(3-2) intensity of I_CO(3-2) < 0.26 K km s^-1 by adopting a velocity width of 67 km s^-1; the H_2 column density of N(H_2) < 3 x 10^20 cm^-2; the molecular gas mass of M(H_2) < 3 x 10^8 M_sun, by assuming a CO line luminosity to H_2 molecular gas mass conversion factor of X_CO = 5.0 x 10^20 cm^-2 (K km s^-1)^-1; and the star formation rate of SFR < 0.1 M_sun yr^-1, based on the Schmidt law. The SFR is consistent with the previous results of H_alpha and mid-IR observations, thereby suggesting that there is no significant obscured star formation in the host galaxy of GRB 980425. This result implies that there is a variety of GRB hosts with regard to the presence of obscured star formation.
  • Over the past five years evidence has mounted that long-duration (> 2 s) gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)--the most brilliant of all astronomical explosions--signal the collapse of massive stars in our Universe. This evidence was originally based on the probable association of one unusual GRB with a supernova, but now includes the association of GRBs with regions of massive star formation in distant galaxies, the appearance of supernova-like 'bumps' in the optical afterglow light curves of several bursts and lines of freshly synthesized elements in the spectra of a few X-ray afterglows. These observations support, but do not yet conclusively demonstrate, the idea that long-duration GRBs are associated with the deaths of massive stars, presumably arising from core collapse. Here we report evidence that a very energetic supernova (a hypernova) was temporally and spatially coincident with a GRB at redshift z = 0.1685. The timing of the supernova indicates that it exploded within a few days of the GRB, strongly suggesting that core-collapse events can give rise to GRBs, thereby favouring the 'collapsar' model.
  • The Faint Sky Variability Survey is aimed at finding photometric and/or astrometric variable objects in the brightness range between 16<V<24 on timescales between tens of minutes and years with photometric precisions ranging from 3 millimagnitudes for the brightest to 0.2 magnitudes for the faintest objects. An area of ~23 square degrees, located at mid and high Galactic latitudes, has been covered using the Wide Field Camera on the 2.5m Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma. Here we describe the main goals of the Faint Sky Variability Survey and the data reduction process.
  • We present and discuss the photometric and spectroscopic evolution of the peculiar SN1998bw, associated with GRB980425, through an analysis of optical and near IR data collected at ESO-La Silla. The spectroscopic data, spanning the period from day -9 to day +376 (relative to B maximum), have shown that this SN was unprecedented, although somewhat similar to SN1997ef. Maximum expansion velocities as high as 3x10^4 km/s to some extent mask its resemblance to other Type Ic SNe. At intermediate phases, between photospheric and fully nebular, the expansion velocities (~10^4 km/s) remained exceptionally high compared to those of other recorded core-collapse SNe at a similar phase. The mild linear polarization detected at early epochs suggests the presence of asymmetry in the emitting material. The degree of asymmetry, however, cannot be decoded from these measurements alone. The HeI 1.083 mu and 2.058 mu lines are identified and He is suggested to lie in an outer region of the envelope. The temporal behavior of the fluxes and profiles of emission lines of MgI]4571A, [OI]6300,6364A and a feature ascribed to Fe are traced to stimulate future modeling work.
  • We report the discovery of the optical counterpart to GRB 980326. Its rapid optical decay can be characterized by a power law with exponent -2.10 +/- 0.13 and a constant underlying source at R_c=25.5 +/- 0.5. Its optical colours 2.1 days after the burst imply a spectral slope of -0.66 +/- 0.70. The gamma-ray spectrum as observed with BATSE shows that it is among the 4% softest bursts ever recorded. We argue that the rapid optical decay may be a reason for the non-detection of some low-energy afterglows of GRBs.