• The observation of the electromagnetic counterpart of gravitational-wave (GW) transient GW170817 demonstrated the potential in extracting astrophysical information from multimessenger discoveries. The forthcoming deployment of the first telescopes of the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) observatory will coincide with Advanced LIGO/Virgo's next observing run, O3, enabling the monitoring of gamma-ray emission at E > 20 GeV, and thus particle acceleration, from GW sources. CTA will not be greatly limited by the precision of GW localization as it will be be capable of rapidly covering the GW error region with sufficient sensitivity. We examine the current status of GW searches and their follow-up effort, as well as the status of CTA, in order to identify some of the general strategies that will enhance CTA's contribution to multimessenger discoveries.
  • Recent advances in fitting prompt emission spectra in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are boosting our understanding of the still elusive origin of this radiation. These progresses have been possible thanks to a more detailed analysis of the low-energy part ($<$\,100\,keV) of the prompt spectrum, where the spectral shape is sometimes found to deviate from a simple power-law shape. This deviation is well described by a spectral break or, alternatively by the addition of a thermal component. Spectral data extending down to less than 1\,keV are extremely relevant for these studies, but presently they are available only for a small subsample of {\it Swift} GRBs observed by XRT (the X-ray telescope, 0.3-10\,keV) during the prompt emission. The space mission \th\ will allow a systematic study of prompt spectra from 0.3\,keV to several MeV. We show that observations performed by \th\ will allow us to discriminate between different models presently considered for GRB prompt studies, solving the long-standing open issue about the nature of the prompt radiation, with relevant consequences on the location of the emitting region, magnetic field strength and presence of thermal components.
  • There are a subset of short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) which exhibit a rebrightening in their high-energy light curves known as extended emission. These bursts have the potential to discern between various models proposed to describe SGRBs as any model needs to account for extended emission. In this paper, we combine fallback accretion into the magnetar propeller model and investigate the morphological changes fallback accretion has on model light curves and fit to the afterglows of 15 SGRBs exhibiting extended emission from the Swift archive. We have parameterised the fallback in terms of existing parameters within the propeller model and solved for the disc mass and angular frequency of the magnetar over time. We then apply a Markov chain Monte Carlo routine to produce fits to the data. We present fits to our extended emission SGRB sample that are morphologically and energetically consistent with the data provided by Swift BAT and XRT telescopes. The parameters derived from these fits are consistent with predictions for magnetar properties and fallback accretion models. Fallback accretion provides a noticeable improvement to the fits of the light curves of SGRBs with extended emission when compared to previous work and could play an important role in explaining features such as variability, flares and long dipole plateaux.
  • High resolution soft X-ray spectroscopy of the prototype accretion disk wind quasar, PDS 456, is presented. Here, the XMM-Newton RGS spectra are analyzed from the large 2013-2014 XMM-Newton campaign, consisting of 5 observations of approximately 100 ks in length. During the last observation (hereafter OBS. E), the quasar is at a minimum flux level and broad absorption line profiles are revealed in the soft X-ray band, with typical velocity widths of $\sigma_{\rm v}\sim 10,000$ km s$^{-1}$. During a period of higher flux in the 3rd and 4th observations (OBS. C and D, respectively), a very broad absorption trough is also present above 1 keV. From fitting the absorption lines with models of photoionized absorption spectra, the inferred outflow velocities lie in the range $\sim 0.1-0.2c$. The absorption lines likely originate from He and H-like neon and L-shell iron at these energies. Comparison with earlier archival data of PDS 456 also reveals similar absorption structure near 1 keV in a 40 ks observation in 2001, and generally the absorption lines appear most apparent when the spectrum is more absorbed overall. The presence of the soft X-ray broad absorption lines is also independently confirmed from an analysis of the XMM-Newton EPIC spectra below 2 keV. We suggest that the soft X-ray absorption profiles could be associated with a lower ionization and possibly clumpy phase of the accretion disk wind, where the latter is known to be present in this quasar from its well studied iron K absorption profile and where the wind velocity reaches a typical value of 0.3$c$.
  • The first gravitational-wave (GW) observations will greatly benefit from the detection of coincident electromagnetic counterparts. Electromagnetic follow-ups will nevertheless be challenging for GWs with poorly reconstructed directions. GW source localization can be inefficient (i) if only two GW observatories are in operation; (ii) if the detectors' sensitivities are highly non-uniform; (iii) for events near the detectors' horizon distance. For these events, follow-up observations will need to cover 100-1000 square degrees of the sky over a limited period of time, reducing the list of suitable telescopes. We demonstrate that the Cherenkov Telescope Array will be capable of following up GW event candidates over the required large sky area with sufficient sensitivity to detect short gamma-ray bursts, which are thought to originate from compact binary mergers, out to the horizon distance of advanced LIGO/Virgo. CTA can therefore be invaluable starting with the first multimessenger detections, even with poorly reconstructed GW source directions. This scenario also provides a further scientific incentive for GW observatories to further decrease the delay of their event reconstruction.
  • We discuss the importance and potential contribution of Athena+ to the science questions related to gamma-ray bursts, tidal disruption events and supernova shock break-out. Athena+ will allow breakthrough observations involving high-resolution X-ray spectroscopic observations of high-z gamma-ray bursts, observations of tidal disruption events tailored to determine the mass and potentially the spin of the black hole responsible for the tidal disruption and observations of X-rays from the supernova shock breakout providing a measure of the radius of the exploding star or of the companion in the case of type Ia supernovae. We briefly discuss survey facilities that will provide triggers to these events envisaged to be operational around 2028.
  • Interferometric detectors will very soon give us an unprecedented view of the gravitational-wave sky, and in particular of the explosive and transient Universe. Now is the time to challenge our theoretical understanding of short-duration gravitational-wave signatures from cataclysmic events, their connection to more traditional electromagnetic and particle astrophysics, and the data analysis techniques that will make the observations a reality. This paper summarizes the state of the art, future science opportunities, and current challenges in understanding gravitational-wave transients.
  • Extended emission gamma-ray bursts are a subset of the `short' class of burst which exhibit an early time rebrightening of gamma emission in their light curves. This extended emission arises just after the initial emission spike, and can persist for up to hundreds of seconds after trigger. When their light curves are overlaid, our sample of 14 extended emission bursts show a remarkable uniformity in their evolution, strongly suggesting a common central engine powering the emission. One potential central engine capable of this is a highly magnetized, rapidly rotating neutron star, known as a magnetar. Magnetars can be formed by two compact objects coallescing, a scenario which is one of the leading progenitor models for short bursts in general. Assuming a magnetar is formed, we gain a value for the magnetic field and late time spin period for 9 of the extended emission bursts by fitting the magnetic dipole spin-down model of Zhang & Meszaros (2001). Assuming the magnetic field is constant, and the observed energy release during extended emission is entirely due to the spin-down of this magnetar, we then derive the spin period at birth for the sample. We find all birth spin periods are in good agreement with those predicted for a newly born magnetar.
  • The origin and progenitors of short-hard gamma-ray bursts remain a puzzle and a highly debated topic. Recent Swift observations suggest that these GRBs may be related to catastrophic explosions in degenerate compact stars, denoted as "Type I" GRBs. The most popular models include the merger of two compact stellar objects (NS-NS or NS-BH). We utilize a Monte Carlo approach to determine whether a merger progenitor model can self-consistently account for all the observations of short-hard GRBs, including a sample with redshift measurements in the Swift era (z-known sample) and the CGRO/BATSE sample. We apply various merger time delay distributions invoked in compact star merger models to derive the redshift distributions of these Type I GRBs, and then constrain the unknown luminosity function of Type I GRBs using the observed luminosity-redshift (L - z) distributions of the z-known sample. The best luminosity function model, together with the adopted merger delay model, are then applied to confront the peak flux distribution (log N - log P distribution) of the BATSE and Swift samples. We find that for all the merger models invoking a range of merger delay time scales (including those invoking a large fraction of "prompt mergers"), it is difficult to reconcile the models with all the data. The data are instead statistically consistent with the following two possible scenarios. First, that short/hard GRBs are a superposition of compact-star-merger origin (Type I) GRBs and a population of GRBs that track the star formation history, which are probably related to the deaths of massive stars (Type II GRBs). Sec- ond, the entire short/hard GRB population is consistent with a typical delay of 2 Gyr with respect to the star formation history with modest scatter. This may point towards a different Type I progenitor than the traditional compact star merger models.
  • We report the results of Swift observations of the Gamma Ray Burst GRB 050603. With a V magnitude V=18.2 about 10 hours after the burst the optical afterglow was the brightest so far detected by Swift and one of the brightest optical afterglows ever seen. The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) light curves show three fast-rise-exponential-decay spikes with $T_{90}$=12s and a fluence of 7.6$\times 10^{-6}$ ergs cm$^{-2}$ in the 15-150 keV band. With an $E_{\rm \gamma, iso} = 1.26 \times 10^{54}$ ergs it was also one of the most energetic bursts of all times. The Swift spacecraft began observing of the afterglow with the narrow-field instruments about 10 hours after the detection of the burst. The burst was bright enough to be detected by the Swift UV/Optical telescope (UVOT) for almost 3 days and by the X-ray Telescope (XRT) for a week after the burst. The X-ray light curve shows a rapidly fading afterglow with a decay index $\alpha$=1.76$^{+0.15}_{-0.07}$. The X-ray energy spectral index was $\beta_{\rm X}$=0.71\plm0.10 with the column density in agreement with the Galactic value. The spectral analysis does not show an obvious change in the X-ray spectral slope over time. The optical UVOT light curve decays with a slope of $\alpha$=1.8\plm0.2. The steepness and the similarity of the optical and X-ray decay rates suggest that the afterglow was observed after the jet break. We estimate a jet opening angle of about 1-2$^{\circ}$
  • We report on XMM-Newton spectroscopic observations of the luminous, radio-quiet quasar PDS 456. The hard X-ray spectrum of PDS 456 shows a deep absorption trough (constituting 50% of the continuum) at energies above 7 keV in the quasar rest frame, which can be attributed to a series of blue-shifted K-shell absorption edges due to highly ionized iron. The higher resolution soft X-ray RGS spectrum exhibits a broad absorption line feature near 1 keV, which can be modeled by a blend of L-shell transitions from highly ionized iron (Fe XVII-XXIV). An extreme outflow velocity of 50000 km/s is required to model the K and L shell iron absorption present in the XMM-Newton data. Overall, a large column density ($N_{H}=5\times10^{23}$cm$^{-2}$) of highly ionized gas (logxi=2.5) is required in PDS 456. A high mass outflow rate of 10 solar masses per year (assuming a conservative outflow covering factor of 0.1 steradian) is derived, which is of the same order as the overall mass accretion rate in PDS 456. The kinetic energy of the outflow represents a substantial fraction (10%) of the quasar energy budget, whilst the large column and outflow velocity place PDS 456 towards the extreme end of the broad absorption line quasar population.
  • During 1998 April 13-16, NGC 3516 was monitored almost continuously with HST for 10.3 hr in the UV and 2.8 d in the optical, and simultaneous RXTE and ASCA monitoring covered the same period. The X-rays were strongly variable with the soft (0.5-2 keV) showing stronger variations (~65% peak-to-peak) than the hard (2-10 keV; ~50% peak-to-peak). The optical continuum showed much smaller but highly significant variations: a slow ~2.5% rise followed by a faster ~3.5% decline. The short UV observation did not show significant variability. The soft and hard X-ray light curves were strongly correlated with no significant lag. Likewise, the optical continuum bands (3590 and 5510 A) were also strongly correlated with no measurable lag above limits of <0.15 d. However no significant correlation or simple relationship could be found for the optical and X-ray light curves. These results appear difficult to reconcile with previous reports of correlations between X-ray and optical variations and of measurable lags within the optical band for some other Seyfert 1s. These results also present serious problems for "reprocessing" models in which the X-ray source heats a stratified accretion disk which then reemits in the optical/ultraviolet: the synchronous variations within the optical would suggest that the emitting region is <0.3 lt-d across, while the lack of correlation between X-ray and optical variations would indicate, in the context of this model, that any reprocessing region must be >1 lt-d in size. It may be possible to resolve this conflict by invoking anisotropic emission or special geometry, but the most natural explanation appears to be that the bulk of the optical luminosity is generated by some other mechanism than reprocessing.