• CRTS J035905.9+175034 is the first eclipsing SU UMa system for which a superoutburst has been observed by Kepler in the short-cadence mode. The light curve contains one superoutburst, eight normal outbursts (including a precursor to the superoutburst), and several minioutbursts that are present before -- but not after -- the superoutburst. The superoutburst began with a precursor normal outburst, and shortly after the peak of the precursor, the system developed large-amplitude superhumps that achieved their maximum amplitude after just three superhump cycles. The period excess of the initial superhump period relative to the orbital period implies a mass ratio of 0.281 +/- 0.015, placing it marginally above most theoretical predictions of the highest-possible mass ratio for superhump formation. In addition, our analysis of the variations in eclipse width and depth, as well as the hot spot amplitudes, generally provides substantiation of the thermal-tidal instability model. The K2 data, in conjunction with our ground-based time-resolved spectroscopy and photometry from 2014-2016, allows us to determine many of the fundamental parameters of this system.
  • Spectra of 38 candidate or known cataclysmic variables are presented. Most are candidate dwarf novae or systems containing possible highly magnetic white dwarfs, while a few (KR Aur, LS Peg, V380 Oph and V694 Mon) are previously known objects caught in unusual states. Individual spectra are used to confirm a dwarf nova nature or other classification while radial velocities of 15 systems provide orbital periods and velocity amplitudes that aid in determining the nature of the objects. Our results substantiate a polar nature for four objects, find an eclipsing SW Sex star below the period gap, another as a likely intermediate polar, as well as two dwarf novae with periods in the middle of the gap.
  • The quiescent periodic photometric modulations of two low-inclination cataclysmic variables observed in Kepler K2 Campaigns 0 and 1, KZ Gem and TW Vir, are investigated. A phase-correcting method was successfully used to detect the orbital modulations of KZ Gem and TW Vir and improve their orbital periods. The light curve morphologies of both CVs were further analyzed by defining flux ratios and creating colormaps. KZ Gem shows ellipsoidal modulations with an orbital period of 0.22242(1) day, twice the period listed in the updated RK catalogue (Edition 7.24). With this newly determined period, KZ Gem is no longer a CV in the period gap, but a long-period CV. A part of the quiescent light curve of TW Vir that had the highest stability was used to deduce its improved orbital period of 0.182682(3) day. The flat patterns shown in the colormaps of the flux ratios for KZ Gem demonstrate the stability of their orbital modulations, while TW Vir show variable orbital modulations during the K2 datasets. In TW Vir, the single versus double-peaked nature of the quiescent orbital variations before and after superoutburst may be related to the effect of the superoutburst on the accretion disk.
  • LSST Science Collaborations: Phil Marshall, Timo Anguita, Federica B. Bianco, Eric C. Bellm, Niel Brandt, Will Clarkson, Andy Connolly, Eric Gawiser, Zeljko Ivezic, Lynne Jones, Michelle Lochner, Michael B. Lund, Ashish Mahabal, David Nidever, Knut Olsen, Stephen Ridgway, Jason Rhodes, Ohad Shemmer, David Trilling, Kathy Vivas, Lucianne Walkowicz, Beth Willman, Peter Yoachim, Scott Anderson, Pierre Antilogus, Ruth Angus, Iair Arcavi, Humna Awan, Rahul Biswas, Keaton J. Bell, David Bennett, Chris Britt, Derek Buzasi, Dana I. Casetti-Dinescu, Laura Chomiuk, Chuck Claver, Kem Cook, James Davenport, Victor Debattista, Seth Digel, Zoheyr Doctor, R. E. Firth, Ryan Foley, Wen-fai Fong, Lluis Galbany, Mark Giampapa, John E. Gizis, Melissa L. Graham, Carl Grillmair, Phillipe Gris, Zoltan Haiman, Patrick Hartigan, Suzanne Hawley, Renee Hlozek, Saurabh W. Jha, C. Johns-Krull, Shashi Kanbur, Vassiliki Kalogera, Vinay Kashyap, Vishal Kasliwal, Richard Kessler, Alex Kim, Peter Kurczynski, Ofer Lahav, Michael C. Liu, Alex Malz, Raffaella Margutti, Tom Matheson, Jason D. McEwen, Peregrine McGehee, Soren Meibom, Josh Meyers, Dave Monet, Eric Neilsen, Jeffrey Newman, Matt O'Dowd, Hiranya V. Peiris, Matthew T. Penny, Christina Peters, Radoslaw Poleski, Kara Ponder, Gordon Richards, Jeonghee Rho, David Rubin, Samuel Schmidt, Robert L. Schuhmann, Avi Shporer, Colin Slater, Nathan Smith, Marcelles Soares-Santos, Keivan Stassun, Jay Strader, Michael Strauss, Rachel Street, Christopher Stubbs, Mark Sullivan, Paula Szkody, Virginia Trimble, Tony Tyson, Miguel de Val-Borro, Stefano Valenti, Robert Wagoner, W. Michael Wood-Vasey, Bevin Ashley Zauderer
    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is designed to provide an unprecedented optical imaging dataset that will support investigations of our Solar System, Galaxy and Universe, across half the sky and over ten years of repeated observation. However, exactly how the LSST observations will be taken (the observing strategy or "cadence") is not yet finalized. In this dynamically-evolving community white paper, we explore how the detailed performance of the anticipated science investigations is expected to depend on small changes to the LSST observing strategy. Using realistic simulations of the LSST schedule and observation properties, we design and compute diagnostic metrics and Figures of Merit that provide quantitative evaluations of different observing strategies, analyzing their impact on a wide range of proposed science projects. This is work in progress: we are using this white paper to communicate to each other the relative merits of the observing strategy choices that could be made, in an effort to maximize the scientific value of the survey. The investigation of some science cases leads to suggestions for new strategies that could be simulated and potentially adopted. Notably, we find motivation for exploring departures from a spatially uniform annual tiling of the sky: focusing instead on different parts of the survey area in different years in a "rolling cadence" is likely to have significant benefits for a number of time domain and moving object astronomy projects. The communal assembly of a suite of quantified and homogeneously coded metrics is the vital first step towards an automated, systematic, science-based assessment of any given cadence simulation, that will enable the scheduling of the LSST to be as well-informed as possible.
  • Time-tag ultraviolet data obtained on the Hubble Space Telescope in 2013 reveal interesting variability related to the white dwarf spin in the two cataclysmic variables RZ Leo and CC Scl. RZ Leo shows a period at 220s and its harmonic at 110s, thus identifying it as a likely Intermediate Polar (IP). The spin signal is not visible in a short single night of ground based data in 2016, but the shorter exposures in that dataset indicate a possible partial eclipse. The much larger UV amplitude of the spin signal in the known IP CC Scl allows the spin of 389s, previously only seen at outburst, to be visible at quiescence. Spectra created from the peaks and troughs of the spin times indicate a hotter temperature of several thousand degrees during the peak phases, with multiple components contributing to the UV light.
  • We present a spectral analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph spectrum of the southern VY Scl nova-like variable BB Doradus, obtained as part of a Cycle 20 {\it HST/COS} survey of accreting white dwarfs in cataclysmic variables. BB Dor was observed with {\it COS} during an intermediate state with a low mass accretion rate, thereby allowing an estimate of the white dwarf temperature. The results of our spectral analysis show that the white dwarf is a significant far ultraviolet component with a temperature of $\sim$35,000-$\sim$50,000$~$K, assuming a $0.80~M_{\odot}$ WD mass ($\log(g)=8.4$). The disk with a mass accretion rate of $\approx 10^{-10}~M_{\odot}~$yr$^{-1}$ contributes about 1/5 to 1/2 of the far ultraviolet flux.
  • We report continued Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ultraviolet spectra and ground-based optical photometry and spectroscopy of GW Librae eight years after its largest known dwarf nova outburst in 2007. This represents the longest cooling timescale measured for any dwarf nova. The spectra reveal that the white dwarf still remains about 3000 K hotter than its quiescent value. Both ultraviolet and optical light curves show a short period of 364-373 s, similar to one of the non-radial pulsation periods present for years prior to the outburst, and with a similar large UV/optical amplitude ratio. A large modulation at a period of 2 h (also similar to that observed prior to outburst) is present in the optical data preceding and during the HST observations, but the satellite observation intervals did not cover the peaks of the optical modulation so it is not possible to determine its corresponding UV amplitude. The similarity of the short and long periods to quiescent values implies the pulsating, fast spinning white dwarf in GW Lib may finally be nearing its quiescent configuration.
  • There are 15 cataclysmic variables (CVs) observed in the first two campaigns of the K2 mission. In this paper, the eight CVs showing distinct features are analyzed in detail. Among these eight, modulations during quiescence are evident at the known orbital periods in the SU UMa stars QZ Vir and RZ Leo, and at our newly determined orbital periods of 1RXS J0632+2536 and WD 1144+011. The periodogram analysis for the quiescent light curve of QZ Vir reveals multi-period modulations and the coexistence of orbital and superhump periods. The phased orbital light curves for the other 3 CVs in quiescence display wide (about half cycle) and shallow (< 0.5 mag) eclipse features. Besides these modulations, their quiescent light curves reveal several transient events: a sudden decrease of system light in 1RXS J0632+2536, a low level flare-like event in QZ Vir, a short brightening event in RZ Leo and a temporary disappearance of the orbital modulation in WD 1144+011. The two known dwarf novae UV Gem and TW Vir and the CVs USNO-B1.01144-00115322 and CSS130516:111236.7+002807 show outbursts, including 1 complete and 3 incomplete normal outbursts and 2 complete superoutbursts. An incomplete but typical normal outburst confirms the dwarf nova identification of the USNO-B1.01144-00115322. The one complete normal outburst in UV Gem possibly provides the orbital period, since its modulations are shorter than the previously observed superhump period. The superoutbursts of TW Vir and CSS130516:111236.7+002807, along with their corresponding superhump periods, indicate that both objects are SU UMa stars. The derived superhump period of CSS130516:111236.7+002807 is 1.44 hr, implying that this new SU UMa star is close to the period minimum.
  • The Time-Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) is an SDSS-IV eBOSS subproject primarily aimed at obtaining identification spectra of ~220,000 optically-variable objects systematically selected from SDSS/Pan-STARRS1 multi-epoch imaging. We present a preview of the science enabled by TDSS, based on TDSS spectra taken over ~320 deg^2 of sky as part of the SEQUELS survey in SDSS-III, which is in part a pilot survey for eBOSS in SDSS-IV. Using the 15,746 TDSS-selected single-epoch spectra of photometrically variable objects in SEQUELS, we determine the demographics of our variability-selected sample, and investigate the unique spectral characteristics inherent in samples selected by variability. We show that variability-based selection of quasars complements color-based selection by selecting additional redder quasars, and mitigates redshift biases to produce a smooth quasar redshift distribution over a wide range of redshifts. The resulting quasar sample contains systematically higher fractions of blazars and broad absorption line quasars than from color-selected samples. Similarly, we show that M-dwarfs in the TDSS-selected stellar sample have systematically higher chromospheric active fractions than the underlying M-dwarf population, based on their H-alpha emission. TDSS also contains a large number of RR Lyrae and eclipsing binary stars with main-sequence colors, including a few composite-spectrum binaries. Finally, our visual inspection of TDSS spectra uncovers a significant number of peculiar spectra, and we highlight a few cases of these interesting objects. With a factor of ~15 more spectra, the main TDSS survey in SDSS-IV will leverage the lessons learned from these early results for a variety of time-domain science applications.
  • We examine Kepler light curve variability on habitable zone transit timescales for a large uniform sample of spectroscopically studied Kepler exoplanet host stars. The stars, taken from Everett et al. (2013) are solar-like in their properties and each harbors at least one exoplanet (or candidate) of radius $\le$2.5\re. The variability timescale examined is typical for habitable zone planets orbiting solar-like stars and we note that the discovery of the smallest exoplanets ($\le$1.2\re) with corresponding transit depths of less than $\sim$0.18 mmag, occur for the brightest, photometrically quietest stars. Thus, these detections are quite rare in $Kepler$ observations. Some brighter and more evolved stars (subgiants), the latter which often show large radial velocity jitter, are found to be among the photometrically quietest solar-like stars in our sample and the most likely small planet transit hunting grounds. The Sun is discussed as a solar-like star proxy to provide insights into the nature and cause of photometric variability. It is shown that $Kepler's$ broad, visible light observations are insensitive to variability caused by chromospheric activity that may be present in the observed stars.
  • We present photometry of 11 and spectroscopy of 35 potential cataclysmic variables from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey and vsnet-alerts. The photometry results include quasi-periodic oscillations during the decline of V1363 Cyg, nightly accretion changes in the likely Polar (AM Herculis binary) SDSS J1344+20, eclipses in SDSS J2141+05 with an orbital period of 76+/-2 min, and possible eclipses in SDSS J2158+09 at an orbital period near 100 min. Time-resolved spectra reveal short orbital periods near 80 min for SDSS J0206+20, 85 min for SDSS J1502+33, and near 100 min for CSS J0015+26, RXS J0150+37, SDSS J1132+62, SDSS J2154+15 and SDSS J2158+09. The prominent HeII line and velocity amplitude of SDSS J2154+15 are consistent with a Polar nature for this object, while the lack of this line and a low velocity amplitude argue against this classification for RXS J0150+37. Single spectra of 10 objects were obtained near outburst and the rest near quiescence, confirming the dwarf novae nature of these objects.
  • The Z Cam stars IW And and V513 Cas are unusual in having outbursts following their standstills in contrast to the usual Z Cam behavior of quiescence following standstills. In order to gain further understanding of these little-studied systems, we obtained spectra correlated with photometry from the AAVSO throughout a 3-4 month interval in 2011. In addition, time-resolved spectra were obtained in 2012 that provided orbital periods of 3.7 hrs for IW And and 5.2 hrs for V513 Cas. The photometry of V513 Cas revealed a regular pattern of standstills and outbursts with little time at quiescence, while IW And underwent many excursions from quiescence to outburst to short standstills. The spectra of IW And are similar to normal dwarf novae, with strong Balmer emission at quiescence and absorption at outburst. In contrast, V513 Cas shows a much flatter/redder spectrum near outburst with strong HeII emission and prominent emission cores in the Balmer lines. Part of this continuum difference may be due to reddening effects. While our attempts to model the outburst and standstill states of IW And indicate a mass accretion rate near 3E-9 solar masses per year, we could find no obvious reason why these systems behave differently following standstill compared to normal Z Cam stars.
  • Hubble Space Telescope spectra obtained in 2010 and 2011, three and four years after the large amplitude dwarf nova outburst of V455 And, were combined with optical photometry and spectra to study the cooling of the white dwarf, its spin, and possible pulsation periods after the outburst. The modeling of the ultraviolet (UV) spectra show that the white dwarf temperature remains ~600 K hotter than its quiescent value at three years post outburst, and still a few hundred degrees hotter at four years post outburst. The white dwarf spin at 67.6 s and its second harmonic at 33.8 s are visible in the optical within a month of outburst and are obvious in the later UV observations in the shortest wavelength continuum and the UV emission lines, indicating an origin in high temperature regions near the accretion curtains. The UV light curves folded on the spin period show a double-humped modulation consistent with two-pole accretion. The optical photometry two years after outburst shows a group of frequencies present at shorter periods (250-263 s) than the periods ascribed to pulsation at quiescence, and these gradually shift toward the quiescent frequencies (300-360 s) as time progresses past outburst. The most surprising result is that the frequencies near this period in the UV data are only prominent in the emission lines, not the UV continuum, implying an origin away from the white dwarf photosphere. Thus, the connection of this group of periods with non-radial pulsations of the white dwarf remains elusive.
  • We report observations of a possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star in the 7-10 Myr old Orion-OB1a/25-Ori region. The candidate was found as part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project. It has a photometric transit period of 0.448413 +- 0.000040 days, and appears in both 2009 and 2010 PTF data. Follow-up low-precision radial velocity (RV) observations and adaptive optics imaging suggest that the star is not an eclipsing binary, and that it is unlikely that a background source is blended with the target and mimicking the observed transit. RV observations with the Hobby-Eberly and Keck telescopes yield an RV that has the same period as the photometric event, but is offset in phase from the transit center by approximately -0.22 periods. The amplitude (half range) of the RV variations is 2.4 km/s and is comparable with the expected RV amplitude that stellar spots could induce. The RV curve is likely dominated by stellar spot modulation and provides an upper limit to the projected companion mass of M_p sin i_orb < 4.8 +- 1.2 M_Jup; when combined with the orbital inclination, i orb, of the candidate planet from modeling of the transit light curve, we find an upper limit on the mass of the planetary candidate of M_p < 5.5 +- 1.4 M_Jup. This limit implies that the planet is orbiting close to, if not inside, its Roche limiting orbital radius, so that it may be undergoing active mass loss and evaporation.
  • We present ground-based optical and near infrared photometric observations and Hubble Space Telescope COS spectroscopic observations of the old nova V842 Cen (Nova Cen 1986). Analysis of the optical light curves reveals a peak at 56.5 +/- 0.3s with an amplitude of 8.9 +/- 4.2 mma, which is consistent with the rotation of a magnetic white dwarf primary in V842 Cen that was detected earlier by Woudt et al., and led to its classification as an intermediate polar.However, our UV lightcurve created from the COS time-tag spectra does not show this periodicity. Our synthetic spectral analysis of an HST COS spectrum rules out a hot white dwarf photosphere as the source of the FUV flux. The best-fitting model to the COS spectrum is a full optically thick accretion disk with no magnetic truncation, a low disk inclination angle, low accretion rate and a distance less than half the published distance that was determined on the basis of interstellar sodium D line strengths.Truncated accretion disks with truncation radii of 3Rwd and 5Rwd yielded unsatisfactory agreement with the COS data. The accretion rate is unexpectedly low for a classical nova only 24 years after the explosion when the accretion rate is expected to be high and the white dwarf should still be very hot, especially if irradiation of the donor star took place. Our low accretion rate is consistent with low accretion rates derived from X-ray and ground-based optical data.
  • Stellar properties are measured for a large set of Kepler Mission exoplanet candidate host stars. Most of these stars are fainter than 14th magnitude, in contrast to other spectroscopic follow-up studies. This sample includes many high-priority Earth-sized candidate planets. A set of model spectra are fitted to R~3000 optical spectra of 268 stars to improve estimates of Teff, log(g), and [Fe/H] for the dwarfs in the range 4750K<Teff<7200K. These stellar properties are used to find new stellar radii and, in turn, new radius estimates for the candidate planets. The result of improved stellar characteristics is a more accurate representation of this Kepler exoplanet sample and identification of promising candidates for more detailed study. This stellar sample, particularly among stars with Teff>5200K, includes a greater number of relatively evolved stars with larger radii than assumed by the mission on the basis of multi-color broadband photometry. About 26% of the modelled stars require radii to be revised upwards by a factor of 1.35 or greater, and modelling of 87% of the stars suggest some increase in radius. The sample presented here also exhibits a change in the incidence of planets larger than 3-4 Earth radii as a function of metallicity. Once [Fe/H] increases to >=-0.05, large planets suddenly appear in the sample while smaller planets are found orbiting stars with a wider range of metallicity. The modelled stellar spectra, as well as an additional 84 stars of mostly lower effective temperatures, are made available to the community.
  • We present an ultraviolet spectrum and light curve of the short orbital period cataclysmic variable EZ Lyn obtained with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope 14 months after its dwarf nova outburst, along with ground-based optical photometry. The UV spectrum can be fit with a 13,100K, log g=8 white dwarf using 0.5 solar composition, while fits to the individual lines are consistent with solar abundance for Si and Al, but only 0.3 solar for C. The Discrete Fourier Transforms of the UV and optical light curves at 14 months following outburst show a prominent period at 256 sec. This is the same period reported by Pavlenko in optical data obtained 7 months and one year after outburst, indicating its long term stability over several months, but this period is not evident in the pre-outburst data and is much shorter than the 12.6 min period that was seen in observations obtained during an interval from 8 months to 2.5 years after the 2006 outburst. In some respects, the long and short periods are similar to the behavior seen in GW Lib after its outburst but the detailed explanation for the appearance and disappearance of these periods and their relation to non-radial pulsation modes remain to be explored with theoretical models.
  • The NASA {\it Kepler} mission has been in science operation since May 2009 and is providing high precision, high cadence light curves of over 150,000 targets. Prior to launch, nine cataclysmic variables were known to lie within {\it Kepler's} field of view. We present spectroscopy for seven systems, four of which were newly discovered since launch. All of the stars presented herein have been observed by, or are currently being observed by, the {\it Kepler} space telescope. Three historic systems and one new candidate could not be detected at their sky position and two candidates are called into question as to their true identity.
  • Since the large amplitude 2007 outburst which heated its accreting, pulsating white dwarf, the dwarf nova system GW Librae has been cooling to its quiescent temperature. Our Hubble Space Telescope ultraviolet spectra combined with ground-based optical coverage during the 3rd and 4th year after outburst show that the fluxes and temperatures are still higher than quiescence (T=19,700K and 17,300K vs 16,000K pre-outburst for a log g=8.7 and d=100 pc). The K{wd} of 7.6+/-0.8 km/s determined from the CI1463 absorption line, as well as the gravitational redshift implies a white dwarf mass of 0.79+/-0.08 Msun. The widths of the UV lines imply a white dwarf rotation velocity vsin i of 40 km/s and a spin period of 209 s (for an inclination of 11 deg and a white dwarf radius of 7x10^{8} cm). Light curves produced from the UV spectra in both years show a prominent multiplet near 290 s, with higher amplitude in the UV compared to the optical, and increased amplitude in 2011 vs 2010. As the presence of this set of periods is intermittent in the optical on weekly timescales, it is unclear how this relates to the non-radial pulsations evident during quiescence.
  • We present Kepler observations of the bright (V=8.3), oscillating star HD 179070. The observations show transit-like events which reveal that the star is orbited every 2.8 days by a small, 1.6 R_Earth object. Seismic studies of HD 179070 using short cadence Kepler observations show that HD 179070 has a frequencypower spectrum consistent with solar-like oscillations that are acoustic p-modes. Asteroseismic analysis provides robust values for the mass and radius of HD 179070, 1.34{\pm}0.06 M{\circ} and 1.86{\pm}0.04 R{\circ} respectively, as well as yielding an age of 2.84{\pm}0.34 Gyr for this F5 subgiant. Together with ground-based follow-up observations, analysis of the Kepler light curves and image data, and blend scenario models, we conservatively show at the >99.7% confidence level (3{\sigma}) that the transit event is caused by a 1.64{\pm}0.04 R_Earth exoplanet in a 2.785755{\pm}0.000032 day orbit. The exoplanet is only 0.04 AU away from the star and our spectroscopic observations provide an upper limit to its mass of ~10 M_Earth (2-{\sigma}). HD 179070 is the brightest exoplanet host star yet discovered by Kepler.
  • This paper completes the series of cataclysmic variables (CVs) identified from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey I/II. The coordinates, magnitudes and spectra of 33 CVs are presented. Among the 33 are eight systems known previous to SDSS (CT Ser, DO Leo, HK Leo, IR Com, V849 Her, V405 Peg, PG1230+226 and HS0943+1404), as well as nine objects recently found through various photometric surveys. Among the systems identified since the SDSS are two polar candidates, two intermediate polar candidates and one candidate for containing a pulsating white dwarf. Our followup data have confirmed a polar candidate from Paper VII and determined tentative periods for three of the newly identified CVs. A complete summary table of the 285 CVs with spectra from SDSS I/II is presented as well as a link to an online table of all known CVs from both photometry and spectroscopy that will continue to be updated as future data appear.
  • The prototype of accreting, pulsating white dwarfs (GW Lib) underwent a large amplitude dwarf nova outburst in 2007. We used ultraviolet data from GALEX and ground-based optical photometry and spectroscopy to follow GW Lib for three years following this outburst. Several variations are apparent during this interval. The optical shows a superhump modulation in the months following outburst while a 19 min quasi-periodic modulation lasting for several months is apparent in the year after outburst. A long timescale (about 4 hr) modulation first appears in the UV a year after outburst and increases in amplitude in the following years. This variation also appears in the optical 2 years after outburst but is not in phase with the UV. The pre-outburst pulsations are not yet visible after 3 years, likely indicating the white dwarf has not returned to its quiescent state.
  • Synthetic spectra covering the wavelength range 900\AA~to 3000\AA~provide an accurate fit, established by a ${\chi}_{\nu}^2$ analysis, to a combined observed spectrum of RW Sextantis. Two separately calibrated distances to the system establish the synthetic spectrum comparison on an absolute flux basis but with two alternative scaling factors, requiring alternative values of $\dot{M}$ for final models. Based on comparisons for a range of $\dot{M}$ values, the observed spectrum does not follow the standard model. Rather than the exponent 0.25 in the expression for the radial temperature profile, a value close to 0.125 produces a synthetic spectrum with an accurate fit to the combined spectrum. A study of time-series $FUSE$ spectra shows that a proposed warped or tilted disk is not supported by the data; an alternative proposal is that an observed non-axisymmetric wind results from an interaction with the mass transfer stream debris.
  • Time-resolved spectra throughout the orbit of EF Eri during its low accretion state were obtained with the Solar Blind Channel on the Advanced Camera for Surveys onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. The overall spectral distribution exhibits peaks at 1500 and 1700A, while the UV light curves display a quasi-sinusoidal modulation over the binary orbit. Models of white dwarfs with a hot spot and cyclotron emission were attempted to fit the spectral variations throughout the orbit. A non-magnetic white dwarf with a temperature of ~10,000K and a hot spot with central temperature of 15,000K generally matches the broad absorptions at 1400 and 1600A with those expected for the quasimolecular H features H2 and H+2 . However, the flux in the core of the Lyalpha absorption does not go to zero, implying an additional component, and the flux variations throughout the orbit are not well matched at long wavelengths. Alternatively, a 9500K white dwarf with a 100 MG cyclotron component can fit the lowest (phase 0.0) fluxes, but the highest fluxes (phase 0.5) require an additional source of magnetic field or temperature. The 100 MG field required for the UV fit is much higher than that which fits the optical/IR wavelengths, which would support previous suggestions of a complex field structure in polars.
  • {\it GALEX} near ultraviolet (NUV) and far-ultraviolet (FUV) light curves of three extremely low accretion rate polars show distinct modulations in their UV light curves. While these three systems have a range of magnetic fields from 13 to 70 MG, and of late type secondaries (including a likely brown dwarf in SDSSJ121209.31+013627.7), the accretion rates are similar, and the UV observations imply some mechanism is operating to create enhanced emission zones on the white dwarf. The UV variations match in phase to the two magnetic poles viewed in the optical in WX LMi and to the single poles evident in the optical in SDSSJ1212109.31+013627.7 and SDSSJ103100.55+202832.2. Simple spot models of the UV light curves show that if hot spots are responsible for the UV variations, the temperatures are on the order of 10,000-14,000K. For the single pole systems, the size of the FUV spot must be smaller than the NUV and in all cases, the geometry is likely more complicated than a simple circular spot.