• We investigate segregation phenomena in galaxy groups in the range of $0.2<z<1$. We study a sample of groups selected from the 4th Data Release of the DEEP2 galaxy redshift survey. We used only groups with at least 8 members within a radius of 4$\;$Mpc. Outliers were removed with the shifting gapper techinque and, then, the virial properties were estimated for each group. The sample was divided into two stacked systems: low($z\leq0.6$) and high($z>0.6$) redshift groups. Assuming that the color index ${(U-B)_0}$ can be used as a proxy for the galaxy type, we found that the fraction of blue (star-forming) objects is higher in the high-z sample, with blue objects being dominant at $M_{B}>-19.5$ for both samples, and red objects being dominant at $M_{B}<-19.5$ only for the low-z sample. Also, the radial variation of the red fraction indicates that there are more red objects with $R<R_{200}$ in the low-z sample than in the high-z sample. Our analysis indicates statistical evidence of kinematic segregation, at the 99%c.l., for the low-z sample: redder and brighter galaxies present lower velocity dispersions than bluer and fainter ones. We also find a weaker evidence for spatial segregation between red and blue objects, at the 70%c.l. The analysis of the high-z sample reveals a different result: red and blue galaxies have velocity dispersion distributions not statistically distinct, although redder objects are more concentrated than the bluer ones at the 95%c.l. From the comparison of blue/red and bright/faint fractions, and considering the approximate lookback timescale between the two samples ($\sim$3 Gyr), our results are consistent with a scenario where bright red galaxies had time to reach energy equipartition, while faint blue/red galaxies in the outskirts infall to the inner parts of the groups, thus reducing spatial segregation from $z\sim0.8$ to $z\sim0.4$.
  • We present the X-ray and optical properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Bo\"otes survey. Our final sample comprises 32 systems at \textbf{$z<1.75$}, with 14 below $z = 0.35$. For these 14 systems we estimate velocity dispersions ($\sigma_{gr}$) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radii ($R_{200}$ and $R_{500}$) and total masses ($M_{200}$ and $M_{500}$) for groups with at least five galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity ($L_X$). We examine the performance of the group properties $\sigma_{gr}$, $L_{opt}$ and $L_X$, as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how well these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how precisely the cluster/group mass function is determined. Exploring the scaling relations built with the X-Bo\"otes sample and comparing these with samples from the literature, we find a break in the $L_X$-$M_{500}$ relation at approximately $M_{500} = 5\times10^{13}$ M$_\odot$ (for $M_{500} > 5\times10^{13}$ M$_\odot$, $M_{500} \propto L_X^{0.61\pm0.02}$, while for $M_{500} \leq 5\times10^{13}$ M$_\odot$, $M_{500} \propto L_X^{0.44\pm0.05}$). Thus, the mass-luminosity relation for galaxy groups cannot be described by the same power law as galaxy clusters. A possible explanation for this break is the dynamical friction, tidal interactions and projection effects which reduce the velocity dispersion values of the galaxy groups. By extending the cluster luminosity function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, particularly eROSITA, will detect. Based on our cluster/group luminosity function estimates, eROSITA will identify $\sim$1800 groups ($L_X = 10^{41}-10^{43}$ ergs s$^{-1}$) within a distance of 200 Mpc. Since groups lie in large scale filaments, this group sample will map the large scale structure of the local universe.
  • We present a detailed description of the Voronoi Tessellation (VT) cluster finder algorithm in 2+1 dimensions, which improves on past implementations of this technique. The need for cluster finder algorithms able to produce reliable cluster catalogs up to redshift 1 or beyond and down to $10^{13.5}$ solar masses is paramount especially in light of upcoming surveys aiming at cosmological constraints from galaxy cluster number counts. We build the VT in photometric redshift shells and use the two-point correlation function of the galaxies in the field to both determine the density threshold for detection of cluster candidates and to establish their significance. This allows us to detect clusters in a self consistent way without any assumptions about their astrophysical properties. We apply the VT to mock catalogs which extend to redshift 1.4 reproducing the $\Lambda$CDM cosmology and the clustering properties observed in the SDSS data. An objective estimate of the cluster selection function in terms of the completeness and purity as a function of mass and redshift is as important as having a reliable cluster finder. We measure these quantities by matching the VT cluster catalog with the mock truth table. We show that the VT can produce a cluster catalog with completeness and purity $>80%$ for the redshift range up to $\sim 1$ and mass range down to $\sim 10^{13.5}$ solar masses.