• The discovery of 1I/2017 U1 ('Oumuamua) has provided the first glimpse of a planetesimal born in another planetary system. This interloper exhibits a variable colour within a range that is broadly consistent with local small bodies such as the P/D type asteroids, Jupiter Trojans, and dynamically excited Kuiper Belt Objects. 1I/'Oumuamua appears unusually elongated in shape, with an axial ratio exceeding 5:1. Rotation period estimates are inconsistent and varied, with reported values between 6.9 and 8.3 hours. Here we analyse all available optical photometry reported to date. No single rotation period can explain the exhibited brightness variations. Rather, 1I/'Oumuamua appears to be in an excited rotational state undergoing Non-Principal Axis (NPA) rotation, or tumbling. A satisfactory solution has apparent lightcurve frequencies of 0.135 and 0.126 hr-1 and implies a longest-to-shortest axis ratio of 5:1, though the available data are insufficient to uniquely constrain the true frequencies and shape. Assuming a body that responds to NPA rotation in a similar manner to Solar System asteroids and comets, the timescale to damp 1I/'Oumuamua's tumbling is at least a billion years. 1I/'Oumuamua was likely set tumbling within its parent planetary system, and will remain tumbling well after it has left ours.
  • The recent discovery by Pan-STARRS1 of 1I/2017 U1 (`Oumuamua), on an unbound and hyperbolic orbit, offers a rare opportunity to explore the planetary formation processes of other stars, and the effect of the interstellar environment on a planetesimal surface. 1I/`Oumuamua's close encounter with the inner Solar System in 2017 October was a unique chance to make observations matching those used to characterize the small-body populations of our own Solar System. We present near-simultaneous g$^\prime$, r$^\prime$, and J photometry and colors of 1I/`Oumuamua from the 8.1-m Frederick C. Gillett Gemini North Telescope, and $gri$ photometry from the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. Our g$^\prime$r$^\prime$J observations are directly comparable to those from the high-precision Colours of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (Col-OSSOS), which offer unique diagnostic information for distinguishing between outer Solar System surfaces. The J-band data also provide the highest signal-to-noise measurements made of 1I/`Oumuamua in the near-infrared. Substantial, correlated near-infrared and optical variability is present, with the same trend in both near-infrared and optical. Our observations are consistent with 1I/`Oumuamua rotating with a double-peaked period of $8.10 \pm 0.42$ hours and being a highly elongated body with an axial ratio of at least 5.3:1, implying that it has significant internal cohesion. The color of the first interstellar planetesimal is at the neutral end of the range of Solar System $g-r$ and $r-J$ solar-reflectance colors: it is like that of some dynamically excited objects in the Kuiper belt and the less-red Jupiter Trojans.
  • We report the discovery of a $H_r = 3.4\pm0.1$ dwarf planet candidate by the Pan-STARRS Outer Solar System Survey. 2010 JO$_{179}$ is red with $(g-r)=0.88 \pm 0.21$, roughly round, and slowly rotating, with a period of $30.6$ hr. Estimates of its albedo imply a diameter of 600--900~km. Observations sampling the span between 2005--2016 provide an exceptionally well-determined orbit for 2010 JO$_{179}$, with a semi-major axis of $78.307\pm0.009$ au, distant orbits known to this precision are rare. We find that 2010 JO$_{179}$ librates securely within the 21:5 mean-motion resonance with Neptune on hundred-megayear time scales, joining the small but growing set of known distant dwarf planets on metastable resonant orbits. These imply a substantial trans-Neptunian population that shifts between stability in high-order resonances, the detached population, and the eroding population of the scattering disk.
  • The cold classical Kuiper belt objects have low inclinations and eccentricities and are the only Kuiper belt population suspected to have formed in situ. Compared with the dynamically excited populations, which exhibit a broad range of colours and a low binary fraction of ~10% cold classical Kuiper belt objects typically have red optical colours with ~30% of the population found in binary pairs; the origin of these differences remains unclear. We report the detection of a population of blue-coloured, tenuously bound binaries residing among the cold classical Kuiper belt objects. Here we show that widely separated binaries could have survived push-out into the cold classical region during the early phases of Neptune's migration. The blue binaries may be contaminants, originating at ~38 au, and could provide a unique probe of the formative conditions in a region now nearly devoid of objects. The idea that the blue objects, which are predominantly binary, are the products of push-out requires that the planetesimals formed entirely as multiples. Plausible formation routes include planetesimal formation via pebble accretion and subsequent binary production through dynamic friction and binary formation during the collapse of a cloud of solids.
  • Water ice covers the surface of various objects in the outer Solar system. Within the heliopause, surface ice is constantly bombarded and sputtered by energetic particles from the solar wind and magnetospheres. We report a laboratory investigation of the sputtering yield of water ice when irradiated at 10 K by 4 keV singly (13C+, N+, O+, Ar+) and doubly charged ions (13C2+, N2+, O2+). The experimental values for the sputtering yields are in good agreement with the prediction of a theoretical model. There is no significant difference in the yield for singly and doubly charged ions. Using these yields, we estimate the rate of water ice erosion in the outer Solar system objects due to solar wind sputtering. Temperature-programmed desorption of the ice after irradiation with 13C+ and 13C2+ demonstrated the formation of 13CO and 13CO2, with 13CO being the dominant formed species.
  • We report the discovery and orbit of a new dwarf planet candidate, 2015 RR$_{245}$, by the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). 2015 RR$_{245}$'s orbit is eccentric ($e=0.586$), with a semi-major axis near 82 au, yielding a perihelion distance of 34 au. 2015 RR$_{245}$ has $g-r = 0.59 \pm 0.11$ and absolute magnitude $H_{r} = 3.6 \pm 0.1$; for an assumed albedo of $p_V = 12$% the object has a diameter of $\sim670$ km. Based on astrometric measurements from OSSOS and Pan-STARRS1, we find that 2015 RR$_{245}$ is securely trapped on ten-Myr timescales in the 9:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune. It is the first TNO identified in this resonance. On hundred-Myr timescales, particles in 2015 RR$_{245}$-like orbits depart and sometimes return to the resonance, indicating that 2015 RR$_{245}$ likely forms part of the long-lived metastable population of distant TNOs that drift between resonance sticking and actively scattering via gravitational encounters with Neptune. The discovery of a 9:2 TNO stresses the role of resonances in the long-term evolution of objects in the scattering disk, and reinforces the view that distant resonances are heavily populated in the current Solar System. This object further motivates detailed modelling of the transient sticking population.
  • Although the majority of Centaurs are thought to have originated in the scattered disk, with the high-inclination members coming from the Oort cloud, the origin of the high inclination component of trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) remains uncertain. We report the discovery of a retrograde TNO, which we nickname "Niku", detected by the Pan-STARRS 1 Outer Solar System Survey. Our numerical integrations show that the orbital dynamics of Niku are very similar to that of 2008 KV$_{42}$ (Drac), with a half-life of $\sim 500$ Myr. Comparing similar high inclination TNOs and Centaurs ($q > 10$ AU, $a < 100$ AU and $i > 60^\circ$), we find that these objects exhibit a surprising clustering of ascending node, and occupy a common orbital plane. This orbital configuration has high statistical significance: 3.8-$\sigma$. An unknown mechanism is required to explain the observed clustering. This discovery may provide a pathway to investigate a possible reservoir of high-inclination objects.
  • We present a model of cometary dust capable of simulating the dynamics within the first few tens of km of the comet surface. Recent measurements by the GIADA and COSIMA instruments on Rosetta show that the nucleus emits fluffy dust particles with porosities above 50% and sizes up to at least mm (Schulz et al. 2015, Rotundi et al. 2015, Fulle et al. 2015). Retrieval of the physical properties of these particles requires a model of the effective forces governing their dynamics. Here, we present a model capable of simulating realistic, large and porous particles using hierarchical aggregates, which shows previous extrapolations to be inadequate. The main strengths of our approach are that we can simulate very large (mm-scale) non-spherical agglomerates and can accurately determine their 1) effective cross-section and ratio of cross-section to mass, 2) gas drag coefficient, and 3) light scattering properties. In practical terms, we find that a more detailed treatment of the dust structure results in 3-5 times higher velocities for large dust particles in the inner coma than previously estimated using spherical particles of the same mass. We apply our model to the dynamics of dust in the vicinity of the nucleus of comet 67P and successfully reproduce the dust speeds reported early on when the comet was roughly 3.5 AU from the Sun. At this stage, we employ a simple spherical comet nucleus, we model activity as constant velocity gas expansion from a uniformly active surface, and use Mie scattering. We discuss pathways to improve on these simplifications in the future.
  • We report the discovery, tracking and detection circumstances for 85 trans-Neptunian objects (TNOs) from the first 42 deg$^{2}$ of the Outer Solar System Origins Survey (OSSOS). This ongoing $r$-band Solar System survey uses the 0.9 deg$^{2}$ field-of-view MegaPrime camera on the 3.6 m Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Our orbital elements for these TNOs are precise to a fractional semi-major axis uncertainty $<0.1\%$. We achieve this precision in just two oppositions, as compared to the normal 3-5 oppositions, via a dense observing cadence and innovative astrometric technique. These discoveries are free of ephemeris bias, a first for large trans-Neptunian surveys. We also provide the necessary information to enable models of TNO orbital distributions to be tested against our TNO sample. We confirm the existence of a cold "kernel" of objects within the main cold classical Kuiper belt, and infer the existence of an extension of the "stirred" cold classical Kuiper belt to at least several AU beyond the 2:1 mean motion resonance with Neptune. We find that the population model of Petit et al. (2011) remains a plausible representation of the Kuiper belt. The full survey, to be completed in 2017, will provide an exquisitely characterized sample of important resonant TNO populations, ideal for testing models of giant planet migration during the early history of the Solar System.
  • We present an observational and dynamical study of newly discovered main-belt comet 313P/Gibbs. We find that the object is clearly active both in observations obtained in 2014 and in precovery observations obtained in 2003 by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, strongly suggesting that its activity is sublimation-driven. This conclusion is supported by a photometric analysis showing an increase in the total brightness of the comet over the 2014 observing period, and dust modeling results showing that the dust emission persists over at least three months during both active periods, where we find start dates for emission no later than 2003 July 24+/-10 for the 2003 active period and 2014 July 28+/-10 for the 2014 active period. From serendipitous observations by the Subaru Telescope in 2004 when the object was apparently inactive, we estimate that the nucleus has an absolute R-band magnitude of H_R=17.1+/-0.3, corresponding to an effective nucleus radius of r_e~1.00+/-0.15 km. The object's faintness at that time means we cannot rule out the presence of activity, and so this computed radius should be considered an upper limit. We find that 313P's orbit is intrinsically chaotic, having a Lyapunov time of T_l=12000 yr and being located near two 3-body mean-motion resonances with Jupiter and Saturn, 11J-1S-5A and 10J+12S-7A, yet appears stable over >50 Myr in an apparent example of stable chaos. We furthermore find that 313P is the second main-belt comet, after P/2012 T1 (PANSTARRS), to belong to the ~155 Myr old Lixiaohua asteroid family.
  • We analyze albedo data obtained using the Herschel Space Observatory that reveal the existence of two distinct types of surface among midsized transneptunian objects. A color-albedo diagram shows two large clusters of objects, one redder and higher albedo and another darker and more neutrally colored. Crucially, all objects in our sample located in dynamically stable orbits within the classical Kuiper belt region and beyond are confined to the bright-red group, implying a compositional link. Those objects are believed to have formed further from the Sun than the dark-neutral bodies. This color-albedo separation is evidence for a compositional discontinuity in the young solar system.
  • We present the results of a search for the reactivation of active asteroid 176P/LINEAR during its 2011 perihelion passage using deep optical observations obtained before, during, and after that perihelion passage. Deep composite images of 176P constructed from data obtained between June 2011 and December 2011 show no visible signs of activity, while photometric measurements of the object during this period also show no significant brightness enhancements similar to that observed for 176P between November 2005 and December 2005 when it was previously observed to be active. An azimuthal search for dust emission likewise reveals no evidence for directed emission (i.e., a tail, as was previously observed for 176P), while a one-dimensional surface brightness profile analysis shows no indication of a spherically symmetric coma at any time in 2011. We conclude that 176P did not in fact exhibit activity in 2011, at least not on the level on which it exhibited activity in 2005, and suggest that this could be due to the devolatization or mantling of the active site responsible for its activity in 2005.
  • We report photometric observations of Kuiper belt object 2013 SQ317 obtained between 2011 August 21 and 2011 November 1 at the 3.58 m New Technology Telescope, La Silla. We obtained a rotational lightcurve for 2013 SQ317 with a large peak-to-peak photometric range 0.85+/-0.05 mag, and a periodicity, P=7.210+/-0.001 hr. We also measure a nearly neutral broadband colour B-R=1.05+/-0.18 mag and a phase function with slope beta=0.95+/-0.41 mag/deg. The large lightcurve range implies an extremely elongated shape for 2013 SQ317, possibly as a single elongated object but most simply explained as a compact binary. If modelled as a compact binary near hydrostatic equilibrium, the bulk density of 2013 SQ317 is near 2670 kg m^(-3). If 2003 SQ317 is instead a single, elongated object, then its equilibrium density is about 860 kg m^(-3). These density estimates become uncertain at the 30% level if we relax the hydrostatic assumption and account for solid, "rubble pile"-type configurations. 2013 SQ317 has been associated with the Haumea family based on its orbital parameters and near-infrared colour; we discuss our findings in this context. If confirmed as a close binary, 2013 SQ317 will be the second object of its kind identified in the Kuiper belt.
  • On 2007 October 29 the outbursting comet 17P/Holmes passed within 0.79 arcsec of a background star. We recorded the event using optical, narrowband photometry and detect a 3% to 4% dip in stellar brightness bracketing the time of closest approach to the comet nucleus. The detected dimming implies an optical depth tau~0.04 at 1.5 arcsec from the nucleus and an optical depth towards the nucleus center tau_n<13.3. At the time of our observations, the coma was optically thick only within rho<~0.01 arcsec from the nucleus. By combining the measured extinction and the scattered light from the coma we estimate a dust red geometric albedo p_d=0.006+/-0.002 at 16 deg phase angle. Our measurements place the most stringent constraints on the extinction optical depth of any cometary coma.
  • Discovered in October 2010 by the LINEAR survey, P/2010 TO20 LINEAR-Grauer (LG) was initially classified as an inert Jupiter Trojan. Subsequent observations obtained in October 2011 revealed LG to be a Jupiter-family comet. LG has one of the largest perihelia (q=5.1 AU) and lowest eccentricities (e=0.09) of the known JFCs. We report on observations of LG taken on 29 October 2011 and numerical simulations of its orbital evolution. Analysis of our data reveals that LG has a small nucleus (<3 km in radius) with broadband colours (B-R=0.99+/-0.06 mag, V-R=0.47+/-0.06 mag) typical of JFCs. We find a model dependent mass-loss rate close to 100 kg/s, most likely powered by water-ice sublimation. Our numerical simulation indicate that the orbit of LG is unstable on very short (10 to 100 yr) timescales and suggest this object has recently evolved into its current location from a more distant, Centaur-type orbit. The orbit, dynamics and activity of LG share similarities with the well known case of comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1.
  • From a dynamical analysis of the orbital elements of transneptunian objects (TNOs), Ragozzine & Brown reported a list of candidate members of the first collisional family found among this population, associated with (136108) Haumea (a.k.a. 2003 EL61). We aim to distinguish the true members of the Haumea collisional family from interlopers. We search for water ice on their surfaces, which is a common characteristic of the known family members. The properties of the confirmed family are used to constrain the formation mechanism of Haumea, its satellites, and its family. Optical and near-infrared photometry is used to identify water ice. We use in particular the CH4 filter of the Hawk-I instrument at the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope as a short H-band (Hs), the (J-Hs) colour being a sensitive measure of the water ice absorption band at 1.6 {\mu}m. Continuing our previous study headed by Snodgrass, we report colours for 8 candidate family members, including near-infrared colours for 5. We confirm one object as a genuine member of the collisional family (2003 UZ117), and reject 5 others. The lack of infrared data for the two remaining objects prevent any conclusion from being drawn. The total number of rejected members is therefore 17. The 11 confirmed members represent only a third of the 36 candidates. The origin of Haumea's family is likely to be related to an impact event. However, a scenario explaining all the peculiarities of Haumea itself and its family remains elusive.
  • Ever since the very first photometric studies of Centaurs and Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) their visible color distribution has been controversial. That controversy gave rise to a prolific debate on the origin of the surface colors of these distant icy objects of the Solar System. Two different views attempt to interpret and explain the large variability of colors, hence surface composition. Are the colors mainly primordial and directly related to the formation region, or are they the result of surface evolution processes? To date, no mechanism has been found that successfully explains why Centaurs, which are escapees from the Kuiper Belt, exhibit two distinct color groups, whereas KBOs do not. In this letter, we readdress this issue using a carefully compiled set of B-R colors and H({\alpha}) magnitudes (as proxy for size) for 253 objects, including data for 10 new small objects. We find that the bimodal behavior seen among Centaurs is a size related phenomenon, common to both Centaurs and small KBOs, i.e. independent of dynamical classification. Further, we find that large KBOs also exhibit a bimodal behavior of surface colors, albeit distinct from the small objects and strongly dependent on the `Haumea collisional family' objects. When plotted in B-R, H({\alpha}) space, the colors of Centaurs and KBOs display a peculiar N shape.
  • We present observations of comet-like main-belt object P/2010 R2 (La Sagra) obtained by Pan-STARRS 1 and the Faulkes Telescope-North on Haleakala in Hawaii, the University of Hawaii 2.2 m, Gemini-North, and Keck I telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Danish 1.54 m telescope at La Silla, and the Isaac Newton Telescope on La Palma. An antisolar dust tail is observed from August 2010 through February 2011, while a dust trail aligned with the object's orbit plane is also observed from December 2010 through August 2011. Assuming typical phase darkening behavior, P/La Sagra is seen to increase in brightness by >1 mag between August 2010 and December 2010, suggesting that dust production is ongoing over this period. These results strongly suggest that the observed activity is cometary in nature (i.e., driven by the sublimation of volatile material), and that P/La Sagra is therefore the most recent main-belt comet to be discovered. We find an approximate absolute magnitude for the nucleus of H_R=17.9+/-0.2 mag, corresponding to a nucleus radius of ~0.7 km, assuming an albedo of p=0.05. Using optical spectroscopy, we find no evidence of sublimation products (i.e., gas emission), finding an upper limit CN production rate of Q_CN<6x10^23 mol/s, from which we infer an H2O production rate of Q_H2O<10^26 mol/s. Numerical simulations indicate that P/La Sagra is dynamically stable for >100 Myr, suggesting that it is likely native to its current location and that its composition is likely representative of other objects in the same region of the main belt, though the relatively close proximity of the 13:6 mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and the (3,-2,-1) three-body mean-motion resonance with Jupiter and Saturn mean that dynamical instability on larger timescales cannot be ruled out.
  • Main belt asteroid (300163) 2006 VW139 (later designated P/2006 VW139) was discovered to exhibit comet-like activity by the Pan-STARRS1 survey telescope using automated point-spread-function analyses performed by PS1's Moving Object Processing System. Deep follow-up observations show both a short (\sim 10") antisolar dust tail and a longer (\sim 60") dust trail aligned with the object's orbit plane, similar to the morphology observed for another main-belt comet, P/2010 R2 (La Sagra), and other well-established comets, implying the action of a long-lived, sublimation-driven emission event. Photometry showing the brightness of the near-nucleus coma remaining constant over \sim 30 days provides further evidence for this object's cometary nature, suggesting it is in fact a main-belt comet, and not a disrupted asteroid. A spectroscopic search for CN emission was unsuccessful, though we find an upper limit CN production rate of Q_CN < 1.3x10^24 mol/s, from which we infer a water production rate of Q_H2O < 10^26 mol/s. We also find an approximately linear optical spectral slope of 7.2%/1000A, similar to other cometary dust comae. Numerical simulations indicate that P/2006 VW139 is dynamically stable for > 100 Myr, while a search for a potential asteroid family around the object reveals a cluster of 24 asteroids within a cutoff distance of 68 m/s. At 70 m/s, this cluster merges with the Themis family, suggesting that it could be similar to the Beagle family to which another main-belt comet, 133P/Elst-Pizarro, belongs.
  • New observations show that the lightcurve of Kuiper belt contact binary (139775) 2001 QG298 has changed substantially since the first observations in 2003. The 2010 lightcurve has a peak-to-peak photometric of range \Deltam{2010}=0.7\pm0.1 mag, significantly lower than in 2003, \Deltam{2003}=1.14\pm0.04 mag. This change is most simply interpreted if 2001 QG298 has an obliquity near 90 deg. The observed decrease in \Deltam is caused by a change in viewing geometry, from equator-on in 2003 to nearly 16 deg (the orbital angular distance covered by the object between the observations) off the equator in 2010. The 2003 and 2010 lightcurves have the same rotation period and appear in phase when shifted by an integer number of full rotations, also consistent with high obliquity. Based on the new 2010 lightcurve data, we find that 2001 QG298 has an obliquity {\epsilon}=90\pm30 deg. Current estimates of the intrinsic fraction of contact binaries in the Kuiper belt are debiased assuming that these objects have randomly oriented spins. If, as 2001 QG298, KBO contact binaries tend to have large obliquities, a larger correction is required. As a result, the abundance of contact binaries may be larger than previously believed.
  • We present a physical characterization of main-belt comet 176P/LINEAR. Observations show the object exhibiting a fan-shaped tail in late 2005, but then becoming inactive in early 2006. Using data from 2007 when the object was observed to be inactive, we derive best-fit IAU phase function parameters of H=15.10 mag and G=0.15, linear phase function parameters of m(1,1,0)=15.35 mag and Beta=0.038 mag/deg, and a rotation period of P_rot=22.23 hr and a photometric range of delta~0.7 mag. In 2005, the nucleus exhibits a significantly smaller photometric range that is attributed to viewing geometry effects. An analysis of these effects showed that 176P likely has an axis ratio of 1.8<b/a<2.1, an obliquity of epsilon~60 deg, and a solstice position at a true anomaly of ~20 deg. Numerical modeling found that 176P's activity can only be reproduced by asymmetric dust emission, such as a cometary jet. We find plausible fits to our observations using models assuming ~10 micron dust particles continuously emitted over 176P's active period, and a jet direction of 180 < alpha_jet < 120 deg and delta_jet ~ -60 deg. We do not find good fits to our observations using models of impulsive dust emission, i.e., what would be expected from an impact. Since for a rotating body, the time-averaged direction of a non-equatorial jet is equivalent to the direction of the nearest rotation pole, we find an equivalent orbital obliquity of 50 < epsilon < 75 deg, consistent with the results of our lightcurve analysis. The results of our lightcurve analysis and dust modeling analysis are furthermore both consistent with the seasonal heating hypothesis used to explain the modulation of 176P's activity. Additional observations are highly encouraged to further characterize 176P's active behavior as the object approaches perihelion on 2011 July 01.
  • One of the most fundamental problems in the study of Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) is to know their true physical size. Without knowledge of their albedos we are not able to distinguish large and dark from small and bright KBOs. Spitzer produced rough estimates of the sizes and albedos of about 20 KBOs, and the Herschel space telescope will improve on those initial measurements by extending the sample to the ~150 brightest KBOs. SPICA's higher sensitivity instruments should allow us not only to broaden the sample to smaller KBOs but also to achieve a statistically significant sample of KBO thermal light curves (Herschel will measure only six objects). A large sample covering a broad range of sizes will be key to identify meaningful correlations between size and other physical and surface properties that constrain the processes of formation and evolution of the solar system.
  • Kuiper belt object 136108 Haumea is one of the most fascinating bodies in our solar system. Approximately 2000x1600x1000 km in size, it is one of the largest Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) and an unusually elongated one for its size. The shape of Haumea is the result of rotational deformation due to its extremely short 3.9-hour rotation period. Unlike other 1000 km-scale KBOs which are coated in methane ice the surface of Haumea is covered in almost pure water-ice. The bulk density of Haumea, estimated around 2.6 g/cc, suggests a more rocky interior composition, different from the water-ice surface. Recently, Haumea has become the second KBO after Pluto to show observable signs of surface features. A region darker and redder than the average surface of Haumea has been identified, the composition and origin of which remain unknown. I discuss this recent finding and what it may tell us about Haumea.
  • We present time-resolved near-infrared (J and H) photometry of the extreme Kuiper belt object (136108) Haumea (formerly 2003 EL61) taken to further investigate rotational variability of this object. The new data show that the near-infrared peak-to-peak photometric range is similar to the value at visible wavelengths, \Delta m_R = 0.30+/-0.02 mag. Detailed analysis of the new and previous data reveals subtle visible/near-infrared color variations across the surface of Haumea. The color variations are spatially correlated with a previously identified surface region, redder in B-R and darker than the mean surface. Our photometry indicates that the J-H colors of Haumea (J-H=-0.057+/-0.016 mag) and its brightest satellite Hi'iaka (J-H=-0.399+/-0.034 mag) are significantly (>9 sigma) different. The satellite Hi'iaka is unusually blue in J-H, consistent with strong 1.5 micron water-ice absorption. The phase coefficient of Haumea in the J-band is found to increase monotonically with wavelength in the range 0.4<lambda<1.3. We compare our findings with other Solar system objects and discuss implications regarding the surface of Haumea.
  • We discuss the current knowledge of the Solar system, focusing on bodies in the outer regions, on the information they provide concerning Solar system formation, and on the possible relationships that may exist between our system and the debris disks of other stars. Beyond the domains of the Terrestrial and giant planets, the comets in the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud preserve some of our most pristine materials. The Kuiper belt, in particular, is a collisional dust source and a scientific bridge to the dusty "debris disks" observed around many nearby main-sequence stars. Study of the Solar system provides a level of detail that we cannot discern in the distant disks while observations of the disks may help to set the Solar system in proper context.