• New and more reliable distances and proper motions of a large number of stars in the Tycho-Gaia Astrometric Solution (TGAS) catalogue allow to calculate the local matter density distribution more precisely than earlier. We devised a method to calculate the stationary gravitational potential distribution perpendicular to the Galactic plane by comparing the vertical probability density distribution of a sample of observed stars with the theoretical probability density distribution computed from their vertical coordinates and velocities. We applied the model to idealised test stars and to the real observational samples. Tests with two mock datasets proved that the method is viable and provides reasonable results. Applying the method to TGAS data we derived that the total matter density in the Solar neighbourhood is $0.09\pm 0.02 \text{M}_\odot\text{pc}^{-3}$ being consistent with the results from literature. The matter surface density within $|z|\le 0.75 \text{kpc}$ is $42\pm 4 \text{M}_\odot\text{pc}^{-2}$. This is slightly less than the results derived by other authors but within errors is consistent with previous estimates. Our results show no firm evidence for significant amount of dark matter in the Solar neighbourhood. However, we caution that our calculations at $|z| \leq 0.75$ kpc rely on an extrapolation from the velocity distribution function calculated at $|z| \leq 25$ pc. This extrapolation can be very sensitive to our assumption that the stellar motions are perfectly decoupled in R and z, and to our assumption of equilibrium. Indeed, we find that $\rho (z)$ within $|z|\le 0.75$ kpc is asymmetric with respect to the Galactic plane at distances $|z| = 0.1-0.4$ kpc indicating that the density distribution may be influenced by density perturbations.
  • Aims: Density waves are often considered as the triggering mechanism of star formation in spiral galaxies. Our aim is to study relations between different star formation tracers (stellar UV and near-IR radiation and emission from HI, CO and cold dust) in the spiral arms of M31, to calculate stability conditions in the galaxy disc and to draw conclusions about possible star formation triggering mechanisms. Methods: We select fourteen spiral arm segments from the de-projected data maps and compare emission distributions along the cross sections of the segments in different datasets to each other, in order to detect spatial offsets between young stellar populations and the star forming medium. By using the disc stability condition as a function of perturbation wavelength and distance from the galaxy centre we calculate the effective disc stability parameters and the least stable wavelengths at different distances. For this we utilise a mass distribution model of M31 with four disc components (old and young stellar discs, cold and warm gaseous discs) embedded within the external potential of the bulge, the stellar halo and the dark matter halo. Each component is considered to have a realistic finite thickness. Results: No systematic offsets between the observed UV and CO/far-IR emission across the spiral segments are detected. The calculated effective stability parameter has a minimal value Q_{eff} ~ 1.8 at galactocentric distances 12 - 13 kpc. The least stable wavelengths are rather long, with the minimal values starting from ~ 3 kpc at distances R > 11 kpc. Conclusions: The classical density wave theory is not a realistic explanation for the spiral structure of M31. Instead, external causes should be considered, e.g. interactions with massive gas clouds or dwarf companions of M31.
  • We probe the feasibility of describing the structure of a multi-component axisymmetric galaxy with a dynamical model based on the Jeans equations while taking into account a third integral of motion. We demonstrate that using the third integral in the form derived by G. Kuzmin, it is possible to calculate the stellar kinematics of a galaxy from the Jeans equations by integrating the equations along certain characteristic curves. In cases where the third integral of motion does not describe the system exactly, the derived kinematics would describe the galaxy only approximately. We apply our method to the Andromeda galaxy, for which the mass distribution is relatively firmly known. We are able to reproduce the observed stellar kinematics of the galaxy rather well. The calculated model suggests that the velocity dispersion ratios ${\sigma}_z^2/{\sigma}_R^2$ of M31 decrease with increasing R. Moving away from the galactic plane, ${\sigma}_z^2/{\sigma}_R^2$ remains the same. The velocity dispersions ${\sigma}_{\theta}^2$ and ${\sigma}_R^2$ are roughly equal in the galactic plane.
  • The objective of this work is to obtain an extinction-corrected distribution of optical surface brightness and colour indices of the large nearby galaxy M 31 using homogeneous observational data and a model for intrinsic extinction. We process the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) images in ugriz passbands and construct corresponding mosaic images, taking special care of subtracting the varying sky background. We apply the galactic model developed in Tempel et al. (2010) and far-infrared imaging to correct the photometry for intrinsic dust effects. We obtain observed and dust-corrected distributions of the surface brightness of M 31 and a map of line-of-sight extinctions inside the galaxy. Our extinction model suggests that either M 31 is intrinsically non-symmetric along the minor axis or the dust properties differ from those of the Milky Way. Assuming the latter case, we present the surface brightness distributions and integral photometry for the Sloan filters as well as the standard UBVRI system. We find the following intrinsic integral colour indices for M 31: (U-B)_0=0.35; (B-V)_0=0.86; (V-R)_0=0.63; (R-I)_0=0.53; the total intrinsic absorption-corrected luminosities of M 31 in the B and the V filters are 4.10 and 3.24 mag, respectively.
  • We create a model for recovering the intrinsic, absorption-corrected surface brightness distribution of a galaxy and apply the model to the M31. We construct a galactic model as a superposition of axially symmetric stellar components and a dust disc to analyse the intrinsic absorption efects. Dust column density is assumed to be proportional to the far-infrared flux of the galaxy. Along each line of sight, the observed far-infrared spectral energy distribution is approximated with modified black body functions considering dust components with different temperatures, allowing to determine the temperatures and relative column densities of the dust components. We apply the model to the nearby galaxy M31 using the Spitzer Space Telescope far-infrared observations for mapping dust distribution and temperature. A warm and a cold dust component are distinguished. The temperature of the warm dust in M31 varies between 56 and 60 K and is highest in the spiral arms; the temperature of the cold component is mostly 15-19 K and rises up to about 25 K at the centre of the galaxy. The intensity-weighted mean temperature of the dust decreases from T ~32 K at the centre to T ~20 K at R ~7 kpc and outwards. We also calculate the intrinsic UBVRIL surface brightness distributions and the spatial luminosity distribution. The intrinsic dust extinction in the V-colour rises from 0.25 mag at the centre to 0.4-0.5 mag at R = 6-13 kpc and decreases smoothly thereafter. The calculated total extinction-corrected luminosity of M31 is L_B = (3.64 pm 0.15) 10^10L_sun, corresponding to an absolute luminosity M_B = (-20.89 pm 0.04) mag. Of the total B-luminosity, 20% (0.24 mag) is obscured from us by the dust inside M31. The intrinsic shape of the bulge is slightly prolate in our best-fit model.
  • We construct a structural model of the Andromeda Galaxy, simultaneously corresponding to observed photometrical and kinematical data and chemical abundances. In this paper we present the observed surface brightness, colour and metallicity distributions, and compare them to the model galaxy. In Paper II (Tempel, Tamm & Tenjes 2007) we present similar data for the kinematics, and derive the mass distribution of the galaxy. On the basis of U, B, V, R, I and L luminosity distributions, we construct the model galaxy as a superposition of four axially symmetric stellar components: a bulge, a disc, an inner halo and an extended diffuse halo. By using far-infrared imaging data of M31 and a thin dust disc assumption, we derive dust-free surface brightness and colour distributions. We find the total absorption corrected luminosity of M31 to be L_B = (3.3+/-0.7)x10^10 L_sun, corresponding to an absolute luminosity M_B = -20.8+/-0.2 mag. Of the total luminosity, 41% (0.57 mag) is obscured from us by the dust inside M31. Using chemical evolution models, we calculate mass-to-light ratios of the components, correspoding to the colour indices and metallicities. We find the total intrinsic mass-to-light ratio of the visible matter to be M/L_B=3.1-5.8 M_sun/L_sun and the total mass of visible matter M_vis =(10-19)x10^10 M_sun. The use of the model parameters for a dynamical analysis and for determining dark matter distribution is presented in Paper II.
  • In the present paper we derive the density distribution of dark matter (DM) in a well-observed nearby disc galaxy, the Andromeda galaxy. From photometrical and chemical evolution models constructed in the first part of the study (Tamm, Tempel & Tenjes 2007 (arXiv:0707.4375), hereafter Paper I) we can calculate the mass distribution of visible components (the bulge, the disc, the stellar halo, the outer diffuse stellar halo). In the dynamical model we calculate stellar rotation velocities along the major axis and velocity dispersions along the major, minor and intermediate axes of the galaxy assuming triaxial velocity dispersion ellipsoid. Comparing the calculated values with the collected observational data, we find the amount of DM, which must be added to reach an agreement with the observed rotation and dispersion data. We conclude that within the uncertainties, the DM distributions by Moore, Burkert, Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) and the Einasto fit with observations nearly at all distances. The NFW and Einasto density distributions give the best fit with observations. The total mass of M 31 with the NFW DM distribution is 1.19*10^12 M_sun, the ratio of the DM mass to the visible mass is 10.0. For the Einasto DM distribution, these values are 1.28*10^12 M_sun and 10.8. The ratio of the DM mass to the visible mass inside the Holmberg radius is 1.75 for the NFW and the Einasto distributions. For different cuspy DM distributions, the virial mass is in a range 6.9-7.9*10^11 M_sun and the virial radius is ~150 kpc. The DM mean densities inside 10 pc for cusped models are 33 and 16 M_sun pc^-3 for the NFW and the Einasto profiles, respectively. For the cored Burkert profile, this value is 0.06 M_sun pc^-3.
  • In the present paper we develop an algorithm allowing to calculate line-of-sight velocity dispersions in an axisymmetric galaxy outside of the galactic plane. When constructing a self-consistent model, we take into account the galactic surface brightness distribution, stellar rotation curve and velocity dispersions. This algorithm is applied to a Sa galaxy NGC 4594 = M 104, for which there exist velocity dispersion measurements outside of the galactic major axis. The mass distribution model is constructed in two stages. In the first stage we construct a luminosity distribution model, where only galactic surface brightness distribution is taken into account. Thereafter, in the second stage we develop on the basis of the Jeans equations a detailed mass distribution model and calculate line-of-sight velocity dispersions and the stellar rotation curve. Here a dark matter halo is added to visible components. Calculated dispersions are compared with observations along different slit positions perpendicular and parallel to the galactic major axis. In the best-fitting model velocity dispersion ellipsoids are radially elongated. Outside the galactic plane velocity dispersion behaviour is more sensitive to the dark matter density distribution and allows to estimate dark halo parameters.
  • Using the HST archive WFPC2 observations and rotation curves measeured by Vogt et al. (1996), we constructed self-consistent light and mass distribution models for three disk galaxies at redshifts z = 0.15, 0.90 and 0.99. The models consist of three components: the bulge, the disk and the dark matter. Spatial density distribution parameters for the components were calculated. After applying k-corrections, mass-to-light ratios for galactic disks within the maximum disk assumption are M/L_B = 4.4, 1.2 and 1.2, respectively. Corresponding central densities of dark matter halos within a truncated isothermal model are 0.0092, 0.028 and 0.015 in units M_sol/pc^3. The light distribution of galaxies in outer parts is steeper than a simple exponential disk.
  • We collected a sample of 100 galaxies for which different observers have determined colour indices of globular cluster candidates. The sample includes representatives of galaxies of various morphological types and different luminosities. Colour indices (in most cases (V-I), but also (B-I) and (C-T1)) were transformed into metallicities [Fe/H] according to a relation by Kissler-Patig (1998). These data were analysed with the KMM software in order to estimate similarity of the distribution with uni- or bimodal Gaussian distribution. We found that 45 of 100 systems have bimodal metallicity distributions. Mean metallicity of the metal-poor component for these galaxies is <[Fe/H]> = -1.40\pm 0.02, of the metal-rich component <[Fe/H]> = -0.69 \pm 0.03. Dispersions of the distributions are 0.15 and 0.18, respectively. Distribution of unimodal metallicities is rather wide. These data will be analysed in a subsequent paper in order to find correlations with parameters of galaxies and galactic environment.