• Without measurement errors in predictors, discontinuity of a nonparametric regression function at unknown locations could be estimated using a number of existing approaches. However, it becomes a challenging problem when the predictors contain measurement errors. In this paper, an error-in-variables jump point estimator is suggested for a nonparametric generalized error-in-variables regression model. A major feature of our method is that it does not impose any parametric distribution on the measurement error. Its performance is evaluated by both numerical studies and theoretical justifications. The method is applied to studying the impact of Medicare Levy Surcharge on the private health insurance take-up rate in Australia.
  • Although anger is an important emotion that underlies much overt aggression at great social cost, little is known about how to quantify anger or to specify the relationship between anger and the overt behaviors that express it. This paper proposes a novel statistical model which provides both a metric for the intensity of anger and an approach to determining the quantitative relationship between anger intensity and the specific behaviors that it controls. From observed angry behaviors, we reconstruct the time course of the latent anger intensity and the linkage between anger intensity and the probability of each angry behavior. The data on which this analysis is based consist of observed tantrums had by 296 children in the Madison WI area during the period 1994--1996. For each tantrum, eight angry behaviors were recorded as occurring or not within each consecutive 30-second unit. So, the data can be characterized as a multivariate, binary, longitudinal (MBL) dataset with a latent variable (anger intensity) involved. Data such as these are common in biomedical, psychological and other areas of the medical and social sciences. Thus, the proposed modeling approach has broad applications.
  • This paper deals with phase II, univariate, statistical process control when a set of in-control data is available, and when both the in-control and out-of-control distributions of the process are unknown. Existing process control techniques typically require substantial knowledge about the in-control and out-of-control distributions of the process, which is often difficult to obtain in practice. We propose (a) using a sequence of control limits for the cumulative sum (CUSUM) control charts, where the control limits are determined by the conditional distribution of the CUSUM statistic given the last time it was zero, and (b) estimating the control limits by bootstrap. Traditionally, the CUSUM control chart uses a single control limit, which is obtained under the assumption that the in-control and out-of-control distributions of the process are Normal. When the normality assumption is not valid, which is often true in applications, the actual in-control average run length, defined to be the expected time duration before the control chart signals a process change, is quite different from the nominal in-control average run length. This limitation is mostly eliminated in the proposed procedure, which is distribution-free and robust against different choices of the in-control and out-of-control distributions.
  • The removal of blur from a signal, in the presence of noise, is readily accomplished if the blur can be described in precise mathematical terms. However, there is growing interest in problems where the extent of blur is known only approximately, for example in terms of a blur function which depends on unknown parameters that must be computed from data. More challenging still is the case where no parametric assumptions are made about the blur function. There has been a limited amount of work in this setting, but it invariably relies on iterative methods, sometimes under assumptions that are mathematically convenient but physically unrealistic (e.g., that the operator defined by the blur function has an integrable inverse). In this paper we suggest a direct, noniterative approach to nonparametric, blind restoration of a signal. Our method is based on a new, ridge-based method for deconvolution, and requires only mild restrictions on the blur function. We show that the convergence rate of the method is close to optimal, from some viewpoints, and demonstrate its practical performance by applying it to real images.