• Superconductors at the atomic two-dimensional (2D) limit are the focus of an enduring fascination in the condensed matter community. This is because, with reduced dimensions, the effects of disorders, fluctuations, and correlations in superconductors become particularly prominent at the atomic 2D limit; thus such superconductors provide opportunities to tackle tough theoretical and experimental challenges. Here, based on the observation of ultrathin 2D superconductivity in mono- and bilayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS$_2$) with electric-double-layer (EDL) gating, we found that the critical sheet carrier density required to achieve superconductivity in a monolayer MoS$_2$ flake can be as low as 0.55*10$^{14}$cm$^{-2}$, which is much lower than those values in the bilayer and thicker cases in previous report and also our own observations. Further comparison of the phonon dispersion obtained by ab initio calculations indicated that the phonon softening of the acoustic modes around the M point plays a key role in the gate-induced superconductivity within the Bardeen-Cooper Schrieffer (BCS) theory framework. This result might help enrich the understanding of 2D superconductivity with EDL gating.
  • Recently, orthorhombic CuMnAs has been proposed to be a magnetic material where topological fermions exist around the Fermi level. Here we report the magnetic structure of the orthorhombic Cu0.95MnAs and Cu0.98Mn0.96As single crystals. While Cu0.95MnAs is a commensurate antiferromagnet (C-AFM) below 360 K with a propagation vector of k = 0, Cu0.98Mn0.96As undergoes a second-order paramagnetic to incommensurate antiferromagnetic (IC-AFM) phase transition at 320 K with k = (0.1,0,0), followed by a second-order IC-AFM to C-AFM phase transition at 230 K. In the C-AFM state, the Mn spins order parallel to the b-axis but antiparallel to their nearest-neighbors with the easy axis along the b axis. This magnetic order breaks Ry gliding and S2z rotational symmetries, the two crucial for symmetry analysis, resulting in finite band gaps at the crossing point and the disappearance of the massless topological fermions. However, the spin-polarized surface states and signature induced by non-trivial topology still can be observed in this system, which makes orthorhombic CuMnAs promising in antiferromagnetic spintronics.
  • Exotic massless fermionic excitations with non-zero Berry flux, other than Dirac and Weyl fermions, could exist in condensed matter systems under the protection of crystalline symmetries, such as spin-1 excitations with 3-fold degeneracy and spin-3/2 Rarita-Schwinger-Weyl fermions. Herein, by using ab initio density functional theory, we show that these unconventional quasiparticles coexist with type-I and type-II Weyl fermions in a family of transition metal silicides, including CoSi, RhSi, RhGe and CoGe, when the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) is considered. Their non-trivial topology results in a series of extensive Fermi arcs connecting projections of these bulk excitations on side surface, which is confirmed by (010) surface electronic spectra of CoSi. In addition, these stable arc states exist within a wide energy window around the Fermi level, which makes them readily accessible in angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy measurements.
  • As one of the simplest systems for realizing Majorana fermions, topological superconductor plays an important role in both condensed matter physics and quantum computations. Based on \emph{ab~initio} calculations and the analysis of an effective 8-band model with the superconducting pairing, we demonstrate that the three dimensional extended $s$-wave Fe-based superconductors such as Fe$_{1+\text{y}}$Se$_{0.5}$Te$_{0.5}$ have a metallic topologically nontrivial band structure, and exhibit a normal-topological-normal superconductivity phase transition on the ($001$) surface by tuning the bulk carrier doping level. In the topological superconductivity (TSC) phase, a Majorana zero mode is trapped at the end of a magnetic vortex line. We further show that, the surface TSC phase only exists up to a certain bulk pairing gap, and there is a normal-topological phase transition driven by the temperature, which has not been discussed before. These results pave an effective way to realize the TSC and Majorana fermions in a large class of superconductors.
  • The analogues of elementary particles have been extensively searched for in condensed matter systems because of both scientific interests and technological applications. Recently massless Dirac fermions were found to emerge as low energy excitations in the materials named Dirac semimetals. All the currently known Dirac semimetals are nonmagnetic with both time-reversal symmetry $\mathcal{T}$ and inversion symmetry $\mathcal{P}$. Here we show that Dirac fermions can exist in one type of antiferromagnetic systems, where $\mathcal{T}$ and $\mathcal{P}$ are broken but their combination $\mathcal{PT}$ is respected. We propose orthorhombic antiferromagnet CuMnAs as a candidate, analyze the robustness of the Dirac points with symmetry protections, and demonstrate its distinctive bulk dispersions as well as the corresponding surface states by \emph{ab initio} calculations. Our results give a new route towards the realization of Dirac materials, and provide a possible platform to study the interplay of Dirac fermion physics and magnetism.
  • Based on first-principles calculations, we find that LiZnBi, a metallic hexagonal $ABC$ compound, can be driven into a Dirac semimetal with a pair of Dirac points by strain. The nontrivial topological nature of the strained LiZnBi is directly demonstrated by calculating its $\mathbb{Z}_2$ index and the surface states, where the Fermi arcs are clearly observed. The low-energy states as well as topological properties are shown to be sensitive to the strain configurations. The finding of Dirac semimetal phase in LiZnBi may intrigue further researches on the topological properties of hexagonal $ABC$ materials and promote new practical applications.
  • The low energy physics of both graphene and surface states of three-dimensional topological insulators is described by gapless Dirac fermions with linear dispersion. In this work, we predict the emergence of a "heavy" Dirac fermion in a graphene/topological insulator hetero-junction, where the linear term almost vanishes and the corresponding energy dispersion becomes highly non-linear. By combining {\it ab initio} calculations and an effective low-energy model, we show explicitly how strong hybridization between Dirac fermions in graphene and the surface states of topological insulators can reduce the Fermi velocity of Dirac fermions. Due to the negligible linear term, interaction effects will be greatly enhanced and can drive "heavy" Dirac fermion states into the half quantum Hall state with non-zero Hall conductance.
  • Three dimensional topological Dirac semi-metals represent a novel state of quantum matter with exotic electronic properties, in which a pair of Dirac points with the linear dispersion along all momentum directions exist in the bulk. Herein, by using the first principles calculations, we discover a new metastable allotrope of Ge and Sn in the staggered layered dumbbell structure, named as germancite and stancite, to be Dirac semi-metals with a pair of Dirac points on its rotation axis. On the surface parallel to the rotation axis, a pair of topologically non-trivial Fermi arcs are observed and a Lifshitz transition is found by tuning the Fermi level. Furthermore, the quantum thin film of germancite is found to be an intrinsic quantum spin Hall insulator. These discoveries suggest novel physical properties and future applications of the new metastable allotrope of Ge and Sn.
  • The existence of gapless Dirac surface band of a three dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) is guaranteed by the non-trivial topological character of the bulk band, yet the surface band dispersion is mainly determined by the environment near the surface. In this Letter, through in-situ angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and the first-principles calculation on 3D TI-based van der Waals heterostructures, we demonstrate that one can engineer the surface band structures of 3D TIs by surface modifications without destroying their topological non-trivial property. The result provides an accessible method to independently control the surface and bulk electronic structures of 3D TIs, and sheds lights in designing artificial topological materials for electronic and spintronic purposes.
  • Two-dimensional stanene is a promising candidate material for realizing room-temperature quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect. Monolayer stanene has recently been fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy, but shows metallic features on Bi$_2$Te$_3$(111) substrate, which motivates us to study the important influence of substrate. Based on first-principles calculations, we find that varying substrate conditions considerably tunes electronic properties of stanene. The supported stanene gives either trivial or QSH states, with significant Rashba splitting induced by inversion asymmetry. More importantly, large-gap (up to 0.3 eV) QSH states are realizable when growing stanene on various substrates, like the anion-terminated (111) surfaces of SrTe, PbTe, BaSe and BaTe. These findings provide significant guidance for future research of stanene and large-gap QSH states.
  • The IrTe2 transition metal dichalcogenide undergoes a series of structural and electronic phase transitions when doped with Pt. The nature of each phase and the mechanism of the phase transitions have attracted much attention. In this paper, we report scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies of Pt doped IrTe2 with varied Pt contents. In pure IrTe2, we find that the ground state has a 1/6 superstructure, and the electronic structure is inconsistent with Fermi surface nesting induced charge density wave order. Upon Pt doping, the crystal structure changes to a 1/5 superstructure and then to a quasi-periodic hexagonal phase. First principles calculations show that the superstructures and electronic structures are determined by the global chemical strain and local impurity states that can be tuned systematically by Pt doping.
  • The interaction between magnetic impurities and the gapless surface state is of critical importance for realizing novel quantum phenomena and new functionalities in topological insulators. By combining angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopic experiments with density functional theory calculations, we show that surface deposition of Cr atoms on Bi$_2$Se$_3$ does not lead to gap opening of the surface state at the Dirac point, indicating the absence of long-range out-of-plane ferromagnetism down to our measurement temperature of 15 K. This is in sharp contrast to bulk Cr doping, and the origin is attributed to different Cr occupation sites. These results highlight the importance of nanoscale configuration of doped magnetic impurities in determining the electronic and magnetic properties of topological insulators.
  • With angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, gap-opening is resolved at up to room temperature in the Dirac surface states of molecular beam epitaxy grown Cr-doped Bi2Se3 topological insulator films, which however show no long-range ferromagnetic order down to 1.5 K. The gap size is found decreasing with increasing electron doping level. Scanning tunneling microscopy and first principles calculations demonstrate that substitutional Cr atoms aggregate into superparamagnetic multimers in Bi2Se3 matrix, which contribute to the observed chemical potential dependent gap-opening in the Dirac surface states without long-range ferromagnetic order.
  • We predict from first-principles calculations a novel structure of stanene with dumbbell units (DB), and show that it is a two-dimensional topological insulator with inverted band gap which can be tuned by compressive strain. Furthermore, we propose that the boron nitride sheet and reconstructed ($2\times2$) InSb(111) surfaces are ideal substrates for the experimental realization of DB stanene, maintaining its non-trivial topology. Combined with standard semiconductor technologies, such as magnetic doping and electrical gating, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, Chern half metallicity and topological superconductivity can be realized in DB stanene on those substrates. These properties make the two-dimensional supported stanene a good platform for the study of new quantum spin Hall insulator as well as other exotic quantum states of matter.
  • The search of large-gap quantum spin Hall (QSH) insulators and effective approaches to tune QSH states is important for both fundamental and practical interests. Based on first-principles calculations we find two-dimensional tin films are QSH insulators with sizable bulk gaps of 0.3 eV, sufficiently large for practical applications at room temperature. These QSH states can be effectively tuned by chemical functionalization and by external strain. The mechanism for the QSH effect in this system is band inversion at the \Gamma point, similar to the case of HgTe quantum well. With surface doping of magnetic elements, the quantum anomalous Hall effect could also be realized.
  • Based on first-principles calculations, we predict Bi2TeI, a stoichiometric compound synthesized, to be a weak topological insulator (TI) in layered subvalent bismuth telluroiodides. Within a bulk energy gap of 80 meV, two Dirac-cone-like topological surface states exist on the side surface perpendicular to BiTeI layer plane. These Dirac cones are relatively isotropic due to the strong inter-layer coupling, distinguished from those of previously reported weak TI candidates. Moreover, with chemically stable cladding layers, the BiTeI-Bi2-BiTeI sandwiched structure is a robust quantum spin Hall system, which can be obtained by simply cleaving the bulk Bi2TeI.
  • The electronic structure of the recently synthesised (3x3) reconstructed silicene on (4x4) Ag(111) is investigated by first-principles calculations. New states emerge due to the strong hybridization between silicene and Ag. Analyzing the nature and composition of these hybridized states, we show that i) it is possible to clearly distinguish them from states coming from the Dirac cone of free-standing silicene or from the sp-bands of bulk Ag and ii) assign their contribution to the description of the linearly dispersing band observed in photoemission. Furthermore, we show that silicene atoms contribute to the Fermi level, which leads to similar STM patterns as observed below or above the Fermi level. Our findings are crucial for the proper interpretation of experimental observations.