• We investigate the maximum coding rate achievable on a two-user broadcast channel for the case where a common message is transmitted with feedback using either fixed-blocklength codes or variable-length codes. For the fixed-blocklength-code setup, we establish nonasymptotic converse and achievability bounds. An asymptotic analysis of these bounds reveals that feedback improves the second-order term compared to the no-feedback case. In particular, for a certain class of antisymmetric broadcast channels, we show that the dispersion is halved. For the variable-length-code setup, we demonstrate that the channel dispersion is zero.
  • We investigate the maximum coding rate for a given average blocklength and error probability over a K-user discrete memoryless broadcast channel for the scenario where a common message is transmitted using variable-length stop-feedback codes. For the point-to-point case, Polyanskiy et al. (2011) demonstrated that variable-length coding combined with stop-feedback significantly increases the speed of convergence of the maximum coding rate to capacity. This speed-up manifests itself in the absence of a square-root penalty in the asymptotic expansion of the maximum coding rate for large blocklengths, i.e., zero dispersion. In this paper, we present nonasymptotic achievability and converse bounds on the maximum coding rate of the common-message K-user discrete memoryless broadcast channel, which strengthen and generalize the ones reported in Trillingsgaard et al. (2015) for the two-user case. An asymptotic analysis of these bounds reveals that zero dispersion cannot be achieved for certain common-message broadcast channels (e.g., the binary symmetric broadcast channel). Furthermore, we identify conditions under which our converse and achievability bounds are tight up to the second order. Through numerical evaluations, we illustrate that our second-order expansions approximate accurately the maximum coding rate and that the speed of convergence to capacity is indeed slower than for the point-to-point case.
  • We present a framework for random access that is based on three elements: physical-layer network coding (PLNC), signature codes and tree splitting. In presence of a collision, physical-layer network coding enables the receiver to decode, i.e. compute, the sum of the packets that were transmitted by the individual users. For each user, the packet consists of the user's signature, as well as the data that the user wants to communicate. As long as no more than K users collide, their identities can be recovered from the sum of their signatures. This framework for creating and transmitting packets can be used as a fundamental building block in random access algorithms, since it helps to deal efficiently with the uncertainty of the set of contending terminals. In this paper we show how to apply the framework in conjunction with a tree-splitting algorithm, which is required to deal with the case that more than K users collide. We demonstrate that our approach achieves throughput that tends to 1 rapidly as K increases. We also present results on net data-rate of the system, showing the impact of the overheads of the constituent elements of the proposed protocol. We compare the performance of our scheme with an upper bound that is obtained under the assumption that the active users are a priori known. Also, we consider an upper bound on the net data-rate for any PLNC based strategy in which one linear equation per slot is decoded. We show that already at modest packet lengths, the net data-rate of our scheme becomes close to the second upper bound, i.e. the overhead of the contention resolution algorithm and the signature codes vanishes.
  • The performance of orthogonal and non-orthogonal multiple access is studied for the multiplexing of enhanced Mobile BroadBand (eMBB) and Ultra-Reliable Low-Latency Communications (URLLC) users in the uplink of a multi-cell Cloud Radio Access Network (C-RAN) architecture. While eMBB users can operate over long codewords spread in time and frequency, URLLC users' transmissions are random and localized in time due to their low-latency requirements. These requirements also call for decoding of their packets to be carried out at the edge nodes (ENs), whereas eMBB traffic can leverage the interference management capabilities of centralized decoding at the cloud. Using information-theoretic arguments, the performance trade-offs between eMBB and URLLC traffic types are investigated in terms of rate for the former, and rate, access latency, and reliability for the latter. The analysis includes non-orthogonal multiple access (NOMA) with different decoding architectures, such as puncturing and successive interference cancellation (SIC). The study sheds light into effective design choices as a function of inter-cell interference, signal-to-noise ratio levels, and fronthaul capacity constraints.
  • The grand objective of 5G wireless technology is to support services with vastly heterogeneous requirements. Network slicing, in which each service operates within an exclusive slice of allocated resources, is seen as a way to cope with this heterogeneity. However, the shared nature of the wireless channel allows non-orthogonal slicing, where services us overlapping slices of resources at the cost of interference. This paper investigates the performance of orthogonal and non-orthogonal slicing of radio resources for the provisioning of the three generic services of 5G: enhanced mobile broadband (eMBB), massive machine-type communications (mMTC), and ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC). We consider uplink communications from a set of eMBB, mMTC and URLLC devices to a common base station. A communication-theoretic model is proposed that accounts for the heterogeneous requirements and characteristics of the three services. For non-orthogonal slicing, different decoding architectures are considered, such as puncturing and successive interference cancellation. The concept of reliability diversity is introduced here as a design principle that takes advantage of the vastly different reliability requirements across the services. This study reveals that non-orthogonal slicing can lead, in some regimes, to significant gains in terms of performance trade-offs among the three generic services compared to orthogonal slicing.
  • The next wave of wireless technologies will proliferate in connecting sensors, machines, and robots for myriad new applications, thereby creating the fabric for the Internet of Things (IoT). A generic scenario for IoT connectivity involves a massive number of machine-type connections. But in a typical application, only a small (unknown) subset of devices are active at any given instant, thus one of the key challenges for providing massive IoT connectivity is to detect the active devices first and then to decode their data with low latency. This article outlines several key signal processing techniques that are applicable to the problem of massive IoT access, focusing primarily on advanced compressed sensing technique and its application for efficient detection of the active devices. We show that massive multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) is especially well-suited for massive IoT connectivity in the sense that the device detection error can be driven to zero asymptotically in the limit as the number of antennas at the base station goes to infinity by using the multiple-measurement vector (MMV) compressed sensing techniques. The paper also provides a perspective on several related important techniques for massive access, such as embedding of short messages onto the device activity detection process and the coded random access.
  • The fifth generation of cellular communication systems is foreseen to enable a multitude of new applications and use cases with very different requirements. A new 5G multiservice air interface needs to enhance broadband performance as well as provide new levels of reliability, latency and supported number of users. In this paper we focus on the massive Machine Type Communications (mMTC) service within a multi-service air interface. Specifically, we present an overview of different physical and medium access techniques to address the problem of a massive number of access attempts in mMTC and discuss the protocol performance of these solutions in a common evaluation framework.
  • Immersive social interactions of mobile users are soon to be enabled within a virtual space, by means of virtual reality (VR) technologies and wireless cellular systems. In a VR mobile social network, the states of all interacting users should be updated synchronously and with low latency via two-way communications with edge computing servers. The resulting end-to-end latency depends on the relationship between the virtual and physical locations of the wireless VR users and of the edge servers. In this work, the problem of analyzing and optimizing the end-to-end latency is investigated for a simple network topology, yielding important insights into the interplay between physical and virtual geometries.
  • We treat the emerging power systems with direct current (DC) MicroGrids, characterized with high penetration of power electronic converters. We rely on the power electronics to propose a decentralized solution for autonomous learning of and adaptation to the operating conditions of the DC Mirogrids; the goal is to eliminate the need to rely on an external communication system for such purpose. The solution works within the primary droop control loops and uses only local bus voltage measurements. Each controller is able to estimate (i) the generation capacities of power sources, (ii) the load demands, and (iii) the conductances of the distribution lines. To define a well-conditioned estimation problem, we employ decentralized strategy where the primary droop controllers temporarily switch between operating points in a coordinated manner, following amplitude-modulated training sequences. We study the use of the estimator in a decentralized solution of the Optimal Economic Dispatch problem. The evaluations confirm the usefulness of the proposed solution for autonomous MicroGrid operation.
  • The stringent requirements of ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC) require rethinking of the physical layer transmission techniques. Massive antenna arrays are seen as an enabler of the emerging $5^\text{th}$ generation systems, due to increases in spectral efficiency and degrees of freedom for transmissions, which can greatly improve reliability under demanding latency requirements. Massive array coherent processing relies on accurate channel state information (CSI) in order to achieve high reliability. In this paper, we investigate the impact of imperfect CSI in a single-input multiple-output (SIMO) system on the coherent receiver. An amplitude-phase keying (APK) symbol constellation is proposed, where each two symmetric symbols reside on distinct power levels. The symbols are demodulated using a dual-stage non-coherent and coherent detection strategy, in order to improve symbol reliability. By means of analysis and simulation, we find an adequate scaling of the constellation and show that for high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and inaccurate CSI regime, the proposed scheme enhances receiver performance.
  • The fifth generation (5G) of wireless systems holds the promise of supporting a wide range of services with different communication requirements. Ultra-reliable low-latency communications (URLLC) is a generic service that enables mission-critical applications, such as industrial automation, augmented reality, and vehicular communications. URLLC has stringent requirements for reliability and latency of delivering both data and control information. In order to meet these requirements, the Third Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) has been introducing new features to the upcoming releases of the cellular system standards, namely releases 15 and beyond. This article reviews some of these features and introduces new enhancements for designing the control channels to efficiently support the URLLC. In particular, a flexible slot structure is presented as a solution to detect a failure in delivering the control information at an early stage, thereby allowing timely retransmission of the control information. Finally, some remaining challenges and envisioned research directions are discussed for shaping the 5G new radio (NR) as a unified wireless access technology for supporting different services.
  • Traditional random access schemes are designed based on the aggregate process of user activation, which is created on the basis of independent activations of the users. However, in Machine-Type Communications (MTC), some users are likely to exhibit a high degree of correlation, e.g. because they observe the same physical phenomenon. This paves the way to devise access schemes that combine scheduling and random access, which is the topic of this work. The underlying idea is to schedule highly correlated users in such a way that their transmissions are less likely to result in a collision. To this end, we propose two greedy allocation algorithms. Both attempt to maximize the throughput using only pairwise correlations, but they rely on different assumptions about the higher-order dependencies. We show that both algorithms achieve higher throughput compared to the traditional random access schemes, suggesting that user correlation can be utilized effectively in access protocols for MTC.
  • Machine-type communication requires rethinking of the structure of short packets due to the coding limitations and the significant role of the control information. In ultra-reliable low-latency communication (URLLC), it is crucial to optimally use the limited degrees of freedom (DoFs) to send data and control information. We consider a URLLC model for short packet transmission with acknowledgement (ACK). We compare the detection/decoding performance of two short packet structures: (1) time-multiplexed detection sequence and data; and (2) structure in which both packet detection and data decoding use all DoFs. Specifically, as an instance of the second structure we use superimposed sequences for detection and data. We derive the probabilities of false alarm and misdetection for an AWGN channel and numerically minimize the packet error probability (PER), showing that for delay-constrained data and ACK exchange, there is a tradeoff between the resources spent for detection and decoding. We show that the optimal PER for the superimposed structure is achieved for higher detection overhead. For this reason, the PER is also higher than in the preamble case. However, the superimposed structure is advantageous due to its flexibility to achieve optimal operation without the need to use multiple codebooks.
  • In many scenarios, low latency wireless communication assumes two-way connection, such that the node that receives information can swiftly send acknowledgment or other response. In this paper, we address the problem of low latency two-way communication and address it through proposal of a base station (BS) cooperation scheme. The scheme is based on downlink (DL) and uplink (UL) decoupled access (DUDA). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the idea of decoupled access is used to reduce latency. We derive the analytical expression for the average latency and verify that the latency expression is valid with outage probability based on stochastic geometry analysis. Both analytical and simulation results show that, with DUDA, the latency can be reduced by approximately 30-60% compared to the traditional coupled access.
  • Blockchain is a technology uniquely suited to support massive number of transactions and smart contracts within the Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem, thanks to the decentralized accounting mechanism. In a blockchain network, the states of the accounts are stored and updated by the validator nodes, interconnected in a peer-to-peer fashion. IoT devices are characterized by relatively low computing capabilities and low power consumption, as well as sporadic and low-bandwidth wireless connectivity. An IoT device connects to one or more validator nodes to observe or modify the state of the accounts. In order to interact with the most recent state of accounts, a device needs to be synchronized with the blockchain copy stored by the validator nodes. In this work, we describe general architectures and synchronization protocols that enable synchronization of the IoT endpoints to the blockchain, with different communication costs and security levels. We model and analytically characterize the traffic generated by the synchronization protocols, and also investigate the power consumption and synchronization trade-off via numerical simulations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that rigorously models the role of wireless connectivity in blockchain-powered IoT systems.
  • Microgrids (MGs) rely on networked control supported by off-the-shelf wireless communications. This makes them vulnerable to cyber-attacks, such as denial-of-service (DoS). In this paper, we mitigate those attacks by applying the concepts of (i) separation of data plane from network control plane, inspired by the software defined networking (SDN) paradigm, and (ii) agile reconfiguration of the data plane connections. In our architecture, all generators operate as either voltage regulators (active agents), or current sources (passive agents), with their operating mode being locally determined, according the global information on the MG state. The software-defined MG control utilizes the fact that, besides the data exchange on the wireless channel, the power-grid bus can be used to create side communication channels that carry control plane information about the state of the MG. For this purpose, we adopt power talk, a modem-less, low-rate, power-line communication designed for direct current (DC) MGs. The results show that the proposed software-defined MG offers superior performance compared to the static MG, as well as resilience against cyber attacks.
  • In many wireless systems, the signal-to-interference-and-noise ratio that is applicable to a certain transmission, referred to as channel state information (CSI), can only be learned after the transmission has taken place and is thereby delayed (outdated). In such systems, hybrid automatic repeat request (HARQ) protocols are often used to achieve high throughput with low latency. This paper put forth the family of expandable message space (EMS) protocols that generalize the HARQ protocol and allow for rate adaptation based on delayed CSI at the transmitter (CSIT). Assuming a block-fading channel, the proposed EMS protocols are analyzed using dynamic programming. When full delayed CSIT is available and there is a constraint on the average decoding time, it is shown that the optimal zero outage EMS protocol has a particularly simple operational interpretation and that the throughput is identical to that of the backtrack retransmission request (BRQ) protocol. We also devise EMS protocols for the case in which CSIT is only available through a finite number of feedback messages. The numerical results demonstrate that the throughput of BRQ approaches the ergodic capacity quickly compared to HARQ, while EMS protocols with only three and four feedback messages achieve throughputs that are only slightly worse than that of BRQ.
  • Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communication (URLLC) is one of the distinctive features of the upcoming 5G wireless communication, going down to packet error rates (PER) of $10^{-9}$. In this paper we discuss the statistical properties of the wireless channel models that are relevant for characterization of the lower tail of the Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF). We show that, for a wide range of channel models, the outage probability at URLLC levels can be approximated by a simple power law expression, whose exponent and offset depend on the actual channel model. The main insights from the analysis can be summarized as follows: (1) the two-wave model and the impact of shadowing in combined models lead to pessimistic predictions of the fading in the URLLC region; (2) the CDFs of models that contain single cluster diffuse components have slopes that correspond to the slope of a Rayleigh fading, and (3) multi-cluster diffuse components can result in different slopes. We apply our power law approximation results to analyze the performance of receiver diversity schemes for URLLC-relevant statistics and obtain a new simplified expression for Maximum Ratio Combining (MRC) in channels with power law tail statistics.
  • In cellular massive Machine-Type Communications (MTC), a device can transmit directly to the base station (BS) or through an aggregator (intermediate node). While direct device-BS communication has recently been in the focus of 5G/3GPP research and standardization efforts, the use of aggregators remains a less explored topic. In this paper we analyze the deployment scenarios in which aggregators can perform cellular access on behalf of multiple MTC devices. We study the effect of packet bundling at the aggregator, which alleviates overhead and resource waste when sending small packets. The aggregators give rise to a tradeoff between access congestion and resource starvation and we show that packet bundling can minimize resource starvation, especially for smaller numbers of aggregators. Under the limitations of the considered model, we investigate the optimal settings of the network parameters, in terms of number of aggregators and packet-bundle size. Our results show that, in general, data aggregation can benefit the uplink massive MTC in LTE, by reducing the signalling overhead.
  • One of the novelties brought by 5G is that wireless system design has increasingly turned its focus on guaranteeing reliability and latency. This shifts the design objective of random access protocols from throughput optimization towards constraints based on reliability and latency. For this purpose, we use frameless ALOHA, which relies on successive interference cancellation (SIC), and derive its exact finite-length analysis of the statistics of the unresolved users (reliability) as a function of the contention period length (latency). The presented analysis can be used to derive the reliability-latency guarantees. We also optimize the scheme parameters in order to maximize the reliability within a given latency. Our approach represents an important step towards the general area of design and analysis of access protocols with reliability-latency guarantees.
  • Radio access management plays a vital role in delay and energy consumption of connected devices. The radio access in existing cellular networks is unable to efficiently support massive connectivity, due to its signaling overhead. In this paper, we investigate an asynchronous grant-free narrowband data transmission protocol that aims to provide low energy consumption and delay, by relaxing the synchronization/reservation requirement at the cost of sending several packet copies at the transmitter side and more complex signal processing at the receiver side. Specifically, the timing and frequency offsets, as well as sending of multiple replicas of the same packet, are exploited as form of diversities at the receiver-side to trigger successive interference cancellation. The proposed scheme is investigated by deriving closed-form expressions for key performance indicators, including reliability and battery-lifetime. The performance evaluation indicates that the scheme can be tuned to realize long battery lifetime radio access for low-complexity devices. The obtained results indicate existence of traffic load regions, where synchronous access outperforms asynchronous access and vice versa.
  • A massive MIMO system, represented by a base station with hundreds of antennas, is capable of spatially multiplexing many devices and thus naturally suited to serve dense crowds of wireless devices in emerging applications, such as machine-type communications. Crowd scenarios pose new challenges in the pilot-based acquisition of channel state information and call for pilot access protocols that match the intermittent pattern of device activity. A joint pilot assignment and data transmission protocol based on random access is proposed in this paper for the uplink of a massive MIMO system. The protocol relies on the averaging across multiple transmission slots of the pilot collision events that result from the random access process. We derive new uplink sum rate expressions that take pilot collisions, intermittent device activity, and interference into account. Simplified bounds are obtained and used to optimize the device activation probability and pilot length. A performance analysis indicates how performance scales as a function of the number of antennas and the transmission slot duration.
  • An important novelty of 5G is its role in transforming the industrial production into Industry 4.0. Specifically, Ultra-Reliable Low Latency Communications (URLLC) will, in many cases, enable replacement of cables with wireless connections and bring freedom in designing and operating interconnected machines, robots, and devices. However, not all industrial links will be of URLLC type; e.g. some applications will require high data rates. Furthermore, these industrial networks will be highly heterogeneous, featuring various communication technologies. We consider network slicing as a mechanism to handle the diverse set of requirements to the network. We present methods for slicing deterministic and packet-switched industrial communication protocols at an abstraction level that is decoupled from the specific implementation of the underlying technologies. Finally, we show how network calculus can be used to assess the end-to-end properties of the network slices.
  • Ultra-reliable low latency communication (URLLC) is an important new feature brought by 5G, with a potential to support a vast set of applications that rely on mission-critical links. In this article, we first discuss the principles for supporting URLLC in the perspective to the traditional assumptions and models applied in communication/information theory. We then discuss how this principles are applied in various elements of the system design, such as use of various diversity sources, design of packets and access protocols. Important messages are that there is a need to optimize the transmission of signaling information, as well as for a lean use of various sources of diversity.
  • This paper presents a small-signal analysis of an islanded microgrid composed of two or more voltage source inverters connected in parallel. The primary control of each inverter is integrated through internal current and voltage loops using PR compensators, a virtual impedance, and an external power controller based on frequency and voltage droops. The frequency restoration function is implemented at the secondary control level, which executes a consensus algorithm that consists of a load-frequency control and a single time delay communication network. The consensus network consists of a time-invariant directed graph and the output power of each inverter is the information shared among the units, which is affected by the time delay. The proposed small-signal model is validated through simulation results and experimental results. A root locus analysis is presented that shows the behavior of the system considering control parameters and time delay variation.