• The energetics and the electronic structure of methylammonium lead bromine (CH3NH3PbBr3) perovskite (001) surfaces are studied based on density functional theory. By examining the surface grand potential, we predict that the CH3NH3Br-terminated (001) surface is energetically more favorable than the PbBr2-terminated (001) surface, under thermodynamic equilibrium conditions of bulk CH3NH3PbBr3. The electronic structure of each of these two different surface terminations retains some of the characteristics of the bulk, while new surface states are found near band edges which may affect the photovoltaic performance in the solar cells based on CH3NH3PbBr3. The calculated electron affinity of CH3NH3PbBr3 reveals a sizable difference for the two surface terminations, indicating a possibility of tuning the band offset between the halide perovskite and adjacent electrode with proper interface engineering.
  • The structural transition at about 1000 {\deg}C, from the hexagonal to the orthorhombic phase of LuFeO3, has been investigated in thin films of LuFeO3. Separation of the two structural phases of LuFeO3 occurs on a length scale of micrometer, as visualized in real space using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM). The results are consistent with X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy obtained from LuFeO3 thin films undergoing the irreversible structural transition from the hexagonal to the orthorhombic phase of LuFeO3, at elevated temperatures. The sharp phase boundaries between the structural phases are observed to align with the crystal planes of the hexagonal LuFeO3 phase. The coexistence of different structural domains indicates that the irreversible structural transition, from the hexagonal to the orthorhombic phase in LuFeO3, is a first order transition, for epitaxial hexagonal LuFeO3 films grown on Al2O3.
  • Electronic structures for the conduction bands of both hexagonal and orthorhombic LuFeO3 thin films have been measured using x-ray absorption spectroscopy at oxygen K (O K) edge. Dramatic differences in both the spectra shape and the linear dichroism are observed. These differences in the spectra can be explained using the differences in crystal field splitting of the metal (Fe and Lu) electronic states and the differences in O 2p-Fe 3d and O 2p-Lu 5d hybridizations. While the oxidation states has not changed, the spectra are sensitive to the changes in the local environments of the Fe3+ and Lu3+ sites in the hexagonal and orthorhombic structures. Using the crystal-field splitting and the hybridizations that are extracted from the measured electronic structures and the structural distortion information, we derived the occupancies of the spin minority states in Fe3+, which are non-zero and uneven. The single ion anisotropy on Fe3+ sites is found to originate from these uneven occupancies of the spin minority states via spin-orbit coupling in LuFeO3.
  • Engineering the electronic structure of organics through interface manipulation, particularly the interface dipole and the barriers to charge carrier injection, is of essential importance to improved organic devices. This requires the meticulous fabrication of desired organic structures by precisely controlling the interactions between molecules. The well-known principles of organic coordination chemistry cannot be applied without proper consideration of extra molecular hybridization, charge transer and dipole formation at the interfaces. Here we identify the interplay between energy level alignment, charge transfer, surface dipole and charge pillow effect and show how these effects collectively determine the net force between adsorbed porphyrin 2H-TPP on Cu(111). We show that the forces between supported porphyrins can be altered by controlling the amount of charge transferred across the interface accurately through the relative alignment of molecular electronic levels with respect to the Shockley surface state of the metal substrate, and hence govern the self-assembly of the molecules.
  • Roughness-insensitive and electrically controllable magnetization at the (0001) surface of antiferromagnetic chromia is observed using magnetometry and spin-resolved photoemission measurements and explained by the interplay of surface termination and magnetic ordering. Further, this surface in placed in proximity with a ferromagnetic Co/Pd multilayer film. Exchange coupling across the interface between chromia and Co/Pd induces an electrically controllable exchange bias in the Co/Pd film, which enables a reversible isothermal (at room temperature) shift of the global magnetic hysteresis loop of the Co/Pd film along the magnetic field axis between negative and positive values. These results reveal the potential of magnetoelectric chromia for spintronic applications requiring non-volatile electric control of magnetization.