• Causal inference is known to be very challenging when only observational data are available. Randomized experiments are often costly and impractical and in instrumental variable regression the number of instruments has to exceed the number of causal predictors. It was recently shown in Peters et al. [2016] that causal inference for the full model is possible when data from distinct observational environments are available, exploiting that the conditional distribution of a response variable is invariant under the correct causal model. Two shortcomings of such an approach are the high computational effort for large-scale data and the assumed absence of hidden confounders. Here we show that these two shortcomings can be addressed if one is willing to make a more restrictive assumption on the type of interventions that generate different environments. Thereby, we look at a different notion of invariance, namely inner-product invariance. By avoiding a computationally cumbersome reverse-engineering approach such as in Peters et al. [2016], it allows for large-scale causal inference in linear structural equation models. We discuss identifiability conditions for the causal parameter and derive asymptotic confidence intervals in the low-dimensional setting. In the case of non-identifiability we show that the solution set of causal Dantzig has predictive guarantees under certain interventions. We derive finite-sample bounds in the high-dimensional setting and investigate its performance on simulated datasets.
  • We investigate the problem of inferring the causal predictors of a response $Y$ from a set of $d$ explanatory variables $(X^1,\dots,X^d)$. Classical ordinary least squares regression includes all predictors that reduce the variance of $Y$. Using only the causal predictors instead leads to models that have the advantage of remaining invariant under interventions, loosely speaking they lead to invariance across different "environments" or "heterogeneity patterns". More precisely, the conditional distribution of $Y$ given its causal predictors remains invariant for all observations. Recent work exploits such a stability to infer causal relations from data with different but known environments. We show that even without having knowledge of the environments or heterogeneity pattern, inferring causal relations is possible for time-ordered (or any other type of sequentially ordered) data. In particular, this allows detecting instantaneous causal relations in multivariate linear time series which is usually not the case for Granger causality. Besides novel methodology, we provide statistical confidence bounds and asymptotic detection results for inferring causal predictors, and present an application to monetary policy in macroeconomics.
  • We provide a view on high-dimensional statistical inference for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). It is in part a review but covers also new developments for meta analysis with multiple studies and novel software in terms of an R-package hierinf. Inference and assessment of significance is based on very high-dimensional multivariate (generalized) linear models: in contrast to often used marginal approaches, this provides a step towards more causal-oriented inference.
  • This is a preliminary draft of "Anchor regression: heterogeneous data meets causality".
  • We propose and study properties of maximum likelihood estimators in the class of conditional transformation models. Based on a suitable explicit parameterisation of the unconditional or conditional transformation function, we establish a cascade of increasingly complex transformation models that can be estimated, compared and analysed in the maximum likelihood framework. Models for the unconditional or conditional distribution function of any univariate response variable can be set-up and estimated in the same theoretical and computational framework simply by choosing an appropriate transformation function and parameterisation thereof. The ability to evaluate the distribution function directly allows us to estimate models based on the exact likelihood, especially in the presence of random censoring or truncation. For discrete and continuous responses, we establish the asymptotic normality of the proposed estimators. A reference software implementation of maximum likelihood-based estimation for conditional transformation models allowing the same flexibility as the theory developed here was employed to illustrate the wide range of possible applications.
  • In this work we propose a framework for constructing goodness of fit tests in both low and high-dimensional linear models. We advocate applying regression methods to the scaled residuals following either an ordinary least squares or Lasso fit to the data, and using some proxy for prediction error as the final test statistic. We call this family Residual Prediction (RP) tests. We show that simulation can be used to obtain the critical values for such tests in the low-dimensional setting, and demonstrate using both theoretical results and extensive numerical studies that some form of the parametric bootstrap can do the same when the high-dimensional linear model is under consideration. We show that RP tests can be used to test for significance of groups or individual variables as special cases, and here they compare favourably with state of the art methods, but we also argue that they can be designed to test for as diverse model misspecifications as heteroscedasticity and nonlinearity.
  • We consider the problem of structure learning for bow-free acyclic path diagrams (BAPs). BAPs can be viewed as a generalization of linear Gaussian DAG models that allow for certain hidden variables. We present a first method for this problem using a greedy score-based search algorithm. We also prove some necessary and some sufficient conditions for distributional equivalence of BAPs which are used in an algorithmic approach to compute (nearly) equivalent model structures, allowing to infer lower bounds of causal effects. The application of our method to datasets reveals that BAP models can represent the data much better than DAG models in these cases.
  • Causal inference from observational data is an ambitious but highly relevant task, with diverse applications ranging from natural to social sciences. Within the scope of nonparametric time series, causal inference defined through interventions (cf. Pearl (2000)) is largely unexplored, although time order simplifies the problem substantially. We consider a marginal integration scheme for inferring causal effects from observational time series data, MINT-T (marginal integration in time series), which is an adaptation for time series of a method proposed by Ernest and B\"{u}hlmann (Electron. J. Statist, pp. 3155-3194, vol. 9, 2015) for the case of independent data. Our approach for stationary stochastic processes is fully nonparametric and, assuming no instantaneous effects consistently recovers the total causal effect of a single intervention with optimal one-dimensional nonparametric convergence rate $n^{-2/5}$ assuming regularity conditions and twice differentiability of a certain corresponding regression function. Therefore, MINT-T remains largely unaffected by the curse of dimensionality as long as smoothness conditions hold in higher dimensions and it is feasible for a large class of stationary time series, including nonlinear and multivariate processes. For the case with instantaneous effects, we provide a procedure which guards against false positive causal statements.
  • We investigate the problem of testing whether $d$ random variables, which may or may not be continuous, are jointly (or mutually) independent. Our method builds on ideas of the two variable Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC) but allows for an arbitrary number of variables. We embed the $d$-dimensional joint distribution and the product of the marginals into a reproducing kernel Hilbert space and define the $d$-variable Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (dHSIC) as the squared distance between the embeddings. In the population case, the value of dHSIC is zero if and only if the $d$ variables are jointly independent, as long as the kernel is characteristic. Based on an empirical estimate of dHSIC, we define three different non-parametric hypothesis tests: a permutation test, a bootstrap test and a test based on a Gamma approximation. We prove that the permutation test achieves the significance level and that the bootstrap test achieves pointwise asymptotic significance level as well as pointwise asymptotic consistency (i.e., it is able to detect any type of fixed dependence in the large sample limit). The Gamma approximation does not come with these guarantees; however, it is computationally very fast and for small $d$, it performs well in practice. Finally, we apply the test to a problem in causal discovery.
  • We consider the identifiability and estimation of partially linear additive structural equation models with Gaussian noise (PLSEMs). Existing identifiability results in the framework of additive SEMs with Gaussian noise are limited to linear and nonlinear SEMs, which can be considered as special cases of PLSEMs with vanishing nonparametric or parametric part, respectively. We close the wide gap between these two special cases by providing a comprehensive theory of the identifiability of PLSEMs by means of (A) a graphical, (B) a transformational, (C) a functional and (D) a causal ordering characterization of PLSEMs that generate a given distribution. In particular, the characterizations (C) and (D) answer the fundamental question to which extent nonlinear functions in additive SEMs with Gaussian noise restrict the set of potential causal models and hence influence the identifiability. On the basis of the transformational characterization (B) we provide a score-based estimation procedure that outputs the graphical representation (A) of the distribution equivalence class of a given PLSEM. We derive its (high-dimensional) consistency and demonstrate its performance on simulated datasets.
  • We propose a residual and wild bootstrap methodology for individual and simultaneous inference in high-dimensional linear models with possibly non-Gaussian and heteroscedastic errors. We establish asymptotic consistency for simultaneous inference for parameters in groups $G$, where $p \gg n$, $s_0 = o(n^{1/2}/\{\log(p) \log(|G|)^{1/2}\})$ and $\log(|G|) = o(n^{1/7})$, with $p$ the number of variables, $n$ the sample size and $s_0$ denoting the sparsity. The theory is complemented by many empirical results. Our proposed procedures are implemented in the R-package hdi.
  • Large-scale sequential data is often exposed to some degree of inhomogeneity in the form of sudden changes in the parameters of the data-generating process. We consider the problem of detecting such structural changes in a high-dimensional regression setting. We propose a joint estimator of the number and the locations of the change points and of the parameters in the corresponding segments. The estimator can be computed using dynamic programming or, as we emphasize here, it can be approximated using a binary search algorithm with $O(n \log(n) \mathrm{Lasso}(n))$ computational operations while still enjoying essentially the same theoretical properties; here $\mathrm{Lasso}(n)$ denotes the computational cost of computing the Lasso for sample size $n$. We establish oracle inequalities for the estimator as well as for its binary search approximation, covering also the case with a large (asymptotically growing) number of change points. We evaluate the performance of the proposed estimation algorithms on simulated data and apply the methodology to real data.
  • We present a (selective) review of recent frequentist high-dimensional inference methods for constructing $p$-values and confidence intervals in linear and generalized linear models. We include a broad, comparative empirical study which complements the viewpoint from statistical methodology and theory. Furthermore, we introduce and illustrate the R-package hdi which easily allows the use of different methods and supports reproducibility.
  • What is the difference of a prediction that is made with a causal model and a non-causal model? Suppose we intervene on the predictor variables or change the whole environment. The predictions from a causal model will in general work as well under interventions as for observational data. In contrast, predictions from a non-causal model can potentially be very wrong if we actively intervene on variables. Here, we propose to exploit this invariance of a prediction under a causal model for causal inference: given different experimental settings (for example various interventions) we collect all models that do show invariance in their predictive accuracy across settings and interventions. The causal model will be a member of this set of models with high probability. This approach yields valid confidence intervals for the causal relationships in quite general scenarios. We examine the example of structural equation models in more detail and provide sufficient assumptions under which the set of causal predictors becomes identifiable. We further investigate robustness properties of our approach under model misspecification and discuss possible extensions. The empirical properties are studied for various data sets, including large-scale gene perturbation experiments.
  • We consider the problem of inferring the total causal effect of a single variable intervention on a (response) variable of interest. We propose a certain marginal integration regression technique for a very general class of potentially nonlinear structural equation models (SEMs) with known structure, or at least known superset of adjustment variables: we call the procedure S-mint regression. We easily derive that it achieves the convergence rate as for nonparametric regression: for example, single variable intervention effects can be estimated with convergence rate $n^{-2/5}$ assuming smoothness with twice differentiable functions. Our result can also be seen as a major robustness property with respect to model misspecification which goes much beyond the notion of double robustness. Furthermore, when the structure of the SEM is not known, we can estimate (the equivalence class of) the directed acyclic graph corresponding to the SEM, and then proceed by using S-mint based on these estimates. We empirically compare the S-mint regression method with more classical approaches and argue that the former is indeed more robust, more reliable and substantially simpler.
  • Large-scale data are often characterized by some degree of inhomogeneity as data are either recorded in different time regimes or taken from multiple sources. We look at regression models and the effect of randomly changing coefficients, where the change is either smoothly in time or some other dimension or even without any such structure. Fitting varying-coefficient models or mixture models can be appropriate solutions but are computationally very demanding and often return more information than necessary. If we just ask for a model estimator that shows good predictive properties for all regimes of the data, then we are aiming for a simple linear model that is reliable for all possible subsets of the data. We propose the concept of "maximin effects" and a suitable estimator and look at its prediction accuracy from a theoretical point of view in a mixture model with known or unknown group structure. Under certain circumstances the estimator can be computed orders of magnitudes faster than standard penalized regression estimators, making computations on large-scale data feasible. Empirical examples complement the novel methodology and theory.
  • Given data sampled from a number of variables, one is often interested in the underlying causal relationships in the form of a directed acyclic graph. In the general case, without interventions on some of the variables it is only possible to identify the graph up to its Markov equivalence class. However, in some situations one can find the true causal graph just from observational data, for example in structural equation models with additive noise and nonlinear edge functions. Most current methods for achieving this rely on nonparametric independence tests. One of the problems there is that the null hypothesis is independence, which is what one would like to get evidence for. We take a different approach in our work by using a penalized likelihood as a score for model selection. This is practically feasible in many settings and has the advantage of yielding a natural ranking of the candidate models. When making smoothness assumptions on the probability density space, we prove consistency of the penalized maximum likelihood estimator. We also present empirical results for simulated scenarios and real two-dimensional data sets (cause-effect pairs) where we obtain similar results as other state-of-the-art methods.
  • We consider high-dimensional inference when the assumed linear model is misspecified. We describe some correct interpretations and corresponding sufficient assumptions for valid asymptotic inference of the model parameters, which still have a useful meaning when the model is misspecified. We largely focus on the de-sparsified Lasso procedure but we also indicate some implications for (multiple) sample splitting techniques. In view of available methods and software, our results contribute to robustness considerations with respect to model misspecification.
  • One challenge of large-scale data analysis is that the assumption of an identical distribution for all samples is often not realistic. An optimal linear regression might, for example, be markedly different for distinct groups of the data. Maximin effects have been proposed as a computationally attractive way to estimate effects that are common across all data without fitting a mixture distribution explicitly. So far just point estimators of the common maximin effects have been proposed in Meinshausen and B\"uhlmann (2014). Here we propose asymptotically valid confidence regions for these effects.
  • We propose a general, modular method for significance testing of groups (or clusters) of variables in a high-dimensional linear model. In presence of high correlations among the covariables, due to serious problems of identifiability, it is indispensable to focus on detecting groups of variables rather than singletons. We propose an inference method which allows to build in hierarchical structures. It relies on repeated sample splitting and sequential rejection, and we prove that it asymptotically controls the familywise error rate. It can be implemented on any collection of clusters and leads to improved power in comparison to more standard non-sequential rejection methods. We complete the theoretical analysis with empirical results for simulated and real data.
  • We develop estimation for potentially high-dimensional additive structural equation models. A key component of our approach is to decouple order search among the variables from feature or edge selection in a directed acyclic graph encoding the causal structure. We show that the former can be done with nonregularized (restricted) maximum likelihood estimation while the latter can be efficiently addressed using sparse regression techniques. Thus, we substantially simplify the problem of structure search and estimation for an important class of causal models. We establish consistency of the (restricted) maximum likelihood estimator for low- and high-dimensional scenarios, and we also allow for misspecification of the error distribution. Furthermore, we develop an efficient computational algorithm which can deal with many variables, and the new method's accuracy and performance is illustrated on simulated and real data.
  • Large-scale data analysis poses both statistical and computational problems which need to be addressed simultaneously. A solution is often straightforward if the data are homogeneous: one can use classical ideas of subsampling and mean aggregation to get a computationally efficient solution with acceptable statistical accuracy, where the aggregation step simply averages the results obtained on distinct subsets of the data. However, if the data exhibit inhomogeneities (and typically they do), the same approach will be inadequate, as it will be unduly influenced by effects that are not persistent across all the data due to, for example, outliers or time-varying effects. We show that a tweak to the aggregation step can produce an estimator of effects which are common to all data, and hence interesting for interpretation and often leading to better prediction than pooled effects.
  • We propose a method for testing whether hierarchically ordered groups of potentially correlated variables are significant for explaining a response in a high-dimensional linear model. In presence of highly correlated variables, as is very common in high-dimensional data, it seems indispensable to go beyond an approach of inferring individual regression coefficients, and we show that detecting smallest groups of variables (MTDs: minimal true detections) is realistic. Thanks to the hierarchy among the groups of variables, powerful multiple testing adjustment is possible which leads to a data-driven choice of the resolution level for the groups. Our procedure, based on repeated sample splitting, is shown to asymptotically control the familywise error rate and we provide empirical results for simulated and real data which complement the theoretical analysis. Supplementary materials for this article are available after the References.
  • We propose a general method for constructing confidence intervals and statistical tests for single or low-dimensional components of a large parameter vector in a high-dimensional model. It can be easily adjusted for multiplicity taking dependence among tests into account. For linear models, our method is essentially the same as in Zhang and Zhang [J. R. Stat. Soc. Ser. B Stat. Methodol. 76 (2014) 217-242]: we analyze its asymptotic properties and establish its asymptotic optimality in terms of semiparametric efficiency. Our method naturally extends to generalized linear models with convex loss functions. We develop the corresponding theory which includes a careful analysis for Gaussian, sub-Gaussian and bounded correlated designs.
  • Discussion of "A significance test for the lasso" by Richard Lockhart, Jonathan Taylor, Ryan J. Tibshirani, Robert Tibshirani [arXiv:1301.7161].