• We describe and analyze an algorithm for computing the homology (Betti numbers and torsion coefficients) of basic semialgebraic sets which works in weak exponential time. That is, out of a set of exponentially small measure in the space of data the cost of the algorithm is exponential in the size of the data. All algorithms previously proposed for this problem have a complexity which is doubly exponential (and this is so for almost all data).
  • The permanent versus determinant conjecture is a major problem in complexity theory that is equivalent to the separation of the complexity classes VP_{ws} and VNP. Mulmuley and Sohoni (SIAM J. Comput., 2001) suggested to study a strengthened version of this conjecture over the complex numbers that amounts to separating the orbit closures of the determinant and padded permanent polynomials. In that paper it was also proposed to separate these orbit closures by exhibiting occurrence obstructions, which are irreducible representations of GL_{n^2}(C), which occur in one coordinate ring of the orbit closure, but not in the other. We prove that this approach is impossible. However, we do not rule out the general approach to the permanent versus determinant problem via multiplicity obstructions as proposed by Mulmuley and Sohoni.
  • We present a polynomial time algorithm to approximately scale tensors of any format to arbitrary prescribed marginals (whenever possible). This unifies and generalizes a sequence of past works on matrix, operator and tensor scaling. Our algorithm provides an efficient weak membership oracle for the associated moment polytopes, an important family of implicitly-defined convex polytopes with exponentially many facets and a wide range of applications. These include the entanglement polytopes from quantum information theory (in particular, we obtain an efficient solution to the notorious one-body quantum marginal problem) and the Kronecker polytopes from representation theory (which capture the asymptotic support of Kronecker coefficients). Our algorithm can be applied to succinct descriptions of the input tensor whenever the marginals can be efficiently computed, as in the important case of matrix product states or tensor-train decompositions, widely used in computational physics and numerical mathematics. We strengthen and generalize the alternating minimization approach of previous papers by introducing the theory of highest weight vectors from representation theory into the numerical optimization framework. We show that highest weight vectors are natural potential functions for scaling algorithms and prove new bounds on their evaluations to obtain polynomial-time convergence. Our techniques are general and we believe that they will be instrumental to obtain efficient algorithms for moment polytopes beyond the ones consider here, and more broadly, for other optimization problems possessing natural symmetries.
  • We initiate the study of average intersection theory in real Grassmannians. We define the expected degree $\textrm{edeg} G(k,n)$ of the real Grassmannian $G(k,n)$ as the average number of real $k$-planes meeting nontrivially $k(n-k)$ random subspaces of $\mathbb{R}^n$, all of dimension $n-k$, where these subspaces are sampled uniformly and independently from $G(n-k,n)$. We express $\textrm{edeg} G(k,n)$ in terms of the volume of an invariant convex body in the tangent space to the Grassmanian, and prove that for fixed $k\ge 2$ and $n\to\infty$, $$ \textrm{edeg} G(k,n) = \textrm{deg} G_\mathbb{C}(k,n)^{\frac{1}{2} \epsilon_k + o(1)}, $$ where $\textrm{deg} G_\mathbb{C}(k,n)$ denotes the degree of the corresponding complex Grassmannian and $\epsilon_k$ is monotonically decreasing with $\lim_{k\to\infty} \epsilon_k = 1$. In the case of the Grassmannian of lines, we prove the finer asymptotic \begin{equation*} \textrm{edeg} G(2,n+1) = \frac{8}{3\pi^{5/2}\sqrt{n}}\, \left(\frac{\pi^2}{4} \right)^n \left(1+\mathcal{O}(n^{-1})\right). \end{equation*} The expected degree turns out to be the key quantity governing questions of the random enumerative geometry of flats. We associate with a semialgebraic set $X\subseteq\mathbb{R}\textrm{P}^{n-1}$ of dimension $n-k-1$ its Chow hypersurface $Z(X)\subseteq G(k,n)$, consisting of the $k$-planes $A$ in $\mathbb{R}^n$ whose projectivization intersects $X$. Denoting $N:=k(n-k)$, we show that $$ \mathbb{E}\#\left(g_1Z(X_1)\cap\cdots\cap g_N Z(X_N)\right) = \textrm{edeg} G(k,n) \cdot \prod_{i=1}^{N} \frac{|X_i|}{|\mathbb{R}\textrm{P}^{m}|}, $$ where each $X_i$ is of dimension $m=n-k-1$, the expectation is taken with respect to independent uniformly distributed $g_1,\ldots,g_m\in O(n)$ and $|X_i|$ denotes the $m$-dimensional volume of $X_i$.
  • We show that the problem of deciding membership in the moment polytope associated with a finite-dimensional unitary representation of a compact, connected Lie group is in NP and coNP. This is the first non-trivial result on the computational complexity of this problem, which naively amounts to a quadratically-constrained program. Our result applies in particular to the Kronecker polytopes, and therefore to the problem of deciding positivity of the stretched Kronecker coefficients. In contrast, it has recently been shown that deciding positivity of a single Kronecker coefficient is NP-hard in general [Ikenmeyer, Mulmuley and Walter, arXiv:1507.02955]. We discuss the consequences of our work in the context of complexity theory and the quantum marginal problem.
  • The numerical condition of the problem of intersecting a fixed $m$-dimensional irreducible complex projective variety $Z\subseteq\mathbb{P}^n$ with a varying linear subspace $L\subseteq\mathbb{P}^n$ of complementary dimension $s=n-m$ is studied. We define the intersection condition number $\kappa_Z(L,z)$ at a smooth intersection point $z\in Z\cap L$ as the norm of the derivative of the locally defined solution map $\mathbb{G}(s,\mathbb{P}^n)\to\mathbb{P}^n,\, L\mapsto z$. We show that $\kappa_Z(L,z) = 1/\sin\alpha$, where $\alpha$ is the minimum angle between the tangent spaces $T_zZ$ and $T_zL$. From this, we derive a condition number theorem that expresses $1/\kappa_Z(L,z)$ as the distance of $L$ to the local Schubert variety, which consists of the linear subspaces having an ill-posed intersection with $Z$ at $z$. A probabilistic analysis of the maximum condition number $\kappa_Z(L) := \max \kappa_Z(L,z_i)$, taken over all intersection points $z_i\in Z\cap L$, leads to the study of the volume of tubes around the Hurwitz hypersurface $\Sigma(Z)$. As a first step towards this, we express the volume of $\Sigma(Z)$ in terms of its degree.
  • We give an introduction to some of the recent ideas that go under the name "geometric complexity theory". We first sketch the proof of the known upper and lower bounds for the determinantal complexity of the permanent. We then introduce the concept of a representation theoretic obstruction, which has close links to algebraic combinatorics, and we explain some of the insights gained so far. In particular, we address very recent insights on the complexity of testing the positivity of Kronecker coefficients. We also briefly discuss the related asymptotic version of this question.
  • Let $f=(f_1,\ldots,f_n)$ be a system of $n$ complex homogeneous polynomials in $n$ variables of degree $d$. We call $\lambda\in\mathbb{C}$ an eigenvalue of $f$ if there exists $v\in\mathbb{C}^n\backslash\{0\}$ with $f(v)=\lambda v$, generalizing the case of eigenvalues of matrices ($d=1$). We derive the distribution of $\lambda$ when the $f_i$ are independently chosen at random according to the unitary invariant Weyl distribution and determine the limit distribution for $n\to\infty$.
  • For several objects of interest in geometric complexity theory, namely for the determinant, the permanent, the product of variables, the power sum, the unit tensor, and the matrix multiplication tensor, we introduce and study a fundamental SL-invariant function that relates the coordinate ring of the orbit with the coordinate ring of its closure. For the power sums we can write down this fundamental invariant explicitly in most cases. Our constructions generalize the two Aronhold invariants on ternary cubics. For the other objects we identify the invariant function conditional on intriguing combinatorial problems much like the well-known Alon-Tarsi conjecture on Latin squares. We provide computer calculations in small dimensions for these cases. As a main tool for our analysis, we determine the stabilizers, and we establish the polystability of all the mentioned forms and tensors (including the generic ones).
  • Quadrics in the Grassmannian of lines in 3-space form a 19-dimensional projective space. We study the subvariety of coisotropic hypersurfaces. Following Gel'fand, Kapranov and Zelevinsky, it decomposes into Chow forms of plane conics, Chow forms of pairs of lines, and Hurwitz forms of quadric surfaces. We compute the ideals of these loci.
  • Smale's 17th problem asks for an algorithm which finds an approximate zero of polynomial systems in average polynomial time (see Smale 2000). The main progress on Smale's problem is Beltr\'an-Pardo (2011) and B\"urgisser-Cucker (2010). In this paper we will improve on both approaches and we prove an important intermediate result. Our main results are Theorem 1 on the complexity of a randomized algorithm which improves the result of Beltr\'an-Pardo (2011), Theorem 2 on the average of the condition number of polynomial systems which improves the estimate found in B\"urgisser-Cucker (2010), and Theorem 3 on the complexity of finding a single zero of polynomial systems. This last Theorem is the main result of B\"urgisser-Cucker (2010). We give a proof of it relying only on homotopy methods, thus removing the need for the elimination theory methods used in B\"urgisser-Cucker (2010). We build on methods developed in Armentano et al. (2015).
  • Let Det_n denote the closure of the GL_{n^2}(C)-orbit of the determinant polynomial det_n with respect to linear substitution. The highest weights (partitions) of irreducible GL_{n^2}(C)-representations occurring in the coordinate ring of Det_n form a finitely generated monoid S(Det_n). We prove that the saturation of S(Det_n) contains all partitions lambda with length at most n and size divisible by n. This implies that representation theoretic obstructions for the permanent versus determinant problem must be holes of the monoid S(Det_n).
  • We describe algorithms for computing eigenpairs (eigenvalue-eigenvector pairs) of a complex $n\times n$ matrix $A$. These algorithms are numerically stable, strongly accurate, and theoretically efficient (i.e., polynomial-time). We do not believe they outperform in practice the algorithms currently used for this computational problem. The merit of our paper is to give a positive answer to a long-standing open problem in numerical linear algebra.
  • We describe algorithms for computing eigenpairs (eigenvalue--eigenvector) of a complex $n\times n$ matrix $A$. These algorithms are numerically stable, strongly accurate, and theoretically efficient (i.e., polynomial-time). We do not believe they outperform in practice the algorithms currently used for this computational problem. The merit of our paper is to give a positive answer to a long-standing open problem in numerical linear algebra.
  • We analyze the probability that a random m-dimensional linear subspace of R^n both intersects a regular closed convex cone C\subseteq R^n and lies within distance \alpha of an m-dimensional subspace not intersecting C (except at the origin). The result is expressed in terms of the spherical intrinsic volumes of the cone C. This allows us to perform an average analysis of the Grassmann condition number \C(A) for the homogeneous convex feasibility problem \exists x\in C\setminus 0 : Ax=0. The Grassmann condition number is a geometric version of Renegar's condition number, that we have introduced recently in [SIOPT 22(3):1029-1041, 2012]. We thus give the first average analysis of convex programming that is not restricted to linear programming. In particular, we prove that if the entries of A\in R^{m\times n} are chosen i.i.d. standard normal, then for any regular cone C, we have E[ln\C(A)]<1.5 ln(n)+1.5. The proofs rely on various techniques from Riemannian geometry applied to Grassmann manifolds.
  • Starting with Knutson and Tao's hive model (in J. Amer. Math. Soc., 1999) we characterize the Littlewood-Richardson coefficient $c_{\lambda,\mu}^\nu$ of given partitions $\lambda,\mu,\nu\in N^n$ as the number of capacity achieving hive flows on the honeycomb graph. Based on this, we design a polynomial time algorithm for deciding $c_{\lambda,\mu}^\nu >0$. This algorithm is easy to state and takes $O(n^3 \log \nu_1)$ arithmetic operations and comparisons. We further show that the capacity achieving hive flows can be seen as the vertices of a connected graph, which leads to new structural insights into Littlewood-Richardson coefficients.
  • We prove the lower bound R(M_m) \geq 3/2 m^2 - 2 on the border rank of m x m matrix multiplication by exhibiting explicit representation theoretic (occurence) obstructions in the sense of the geometric complexity theory (GCT) program. While this bound is weaker than the one recently obtained by Landsberg and Ottaviani, these are the first significant lower bounds obtained within the GCT program. Behind the proof is the new combinatorial concept of obstruction designs, which encode highest weight vectors in Sym^d\otimes^3(C^n)^* and provide new insights into Kronecker coefficients.
  • We prove that for any partition $(\lambda_1,...,\lambda_{d^2})$ of size $\ell d$ there exists $k\ge 1$ such that the tensor square of the irreducible representation of the symmetric group $S_{k\ell d}$ with respect to the rectangular partition $(k\ell,...,k\ell)$ contains the irreducible representation corresponding to the stretched partition $(k\lambda_1,...,k\lambda_{d^2})$. We also prove a related approximate version of this statement in which the stretching factor $k$ is effectively bounded in terms of $d$. This investigation is motivated by questions of geometric complexity theory.
  • We introduce and analyze a natural geometric version of Renegar's condition number R for the homogeneous convex feasibility problem associated with a regular cone C subseteq R^n. Let Gr_{n,m} denote the Grassmann manifold of m-dimensional linear subspaces of R^n and consider the projection distance d_p(W_1,W_2) := ||Pi_{W_1} - Pi_{W_2}|| (spectral norm) between W_1 and W_2 in Gr_{n,m}, where Pi_{W_i} denotes the orthogonal projection onto W_i. We call C_G(W) := max {d_p(W,W')^{-1} | W' \in Sigma_m} the Grassmann condition number of W in Gr_{n,m}, where the set of ill-posed instances Sigma_m subset Gr_{n,m} is defined as the set of linear subspaces touching C. We show that if W = im(A^T) for a matrix A in R^{m\times n}, then C_G(W) \le R(A) \le C_G(W) kappa(A), where kappa(A) =||A|| ||A^\dagger|| denotes the matrix condition number. This extends work by Belloni and Freund in Math. Program. 119:95-107 (2009). Furthermore, we show that C_G(W) can as well be characterized in terms of the Riemannian distance metric on Gr_{n,m}. This differential geometric characterization of C_G(W) is the starting point of the sequel [arXiv:1112.2603] to this paper, where the first probabilistic analysis of Renegar's condition number for an arbitrary regular cone C is achieved.
  • We compute the intrinsic volumes of the cone of positive semidefinite matrices over the real numbers, over the complex numbers, and over the quaternions, in terms of integrals related to Mehta's integral. Several applications for the probabilistic analysis of semidefinite programming are given.
  • We prove that for all natural numbers k,n,d with k <= d and every partition lambda of size kn with at most k parts there exists an irreducible GL(d, C)-representation of highest weight 2*lambda in the plethysm Sym^k(Sym^(2n) (C^d)). This gives an affirmative answer to a conjecture by Weintraub (J. Algebra, 129 (1):103-114, 1990). Our investigation is motivated by questions of geometric complexity theory and uses ideas from quantum information theory.
  • This paper has two agendas. Firstly, we exhibit new results for coverage processes. Let $p(n,m,\alpha)$ be the probability that $n$ spherical caps of angular radius $\alpha$ in $S^m$ do not cover the whole sphere $S^m$. We give an exact formula for $p(n,m,\alpha)$ in the case $\alpha\in[\pi/2,\pi]$ and an upper bound for $p(n,m,\alpha)$ in the case $\alpha\in [0,\pi/2]$ which tends to $p(n,m,\pi/2)$ when $\alpha\to\pi/2$. In the case $\alpha\in[0,\pi/2]$ this yields upper bounds for the expected number of spherical caps of radius $\alpha$ that are needed to cover $S^m$. Secondly, we study the condition number ${\mathscr{C}}(A)$ of the linear programming feasibility problem $\exists x\in\mathbb{R}^{m+1}Ax\le0,x\ne0$ where $A\in\mathbb{R}^{n\times(m+1)}$ is randomly chosen according to the standard normal distribution. We exactly determine the distribution of ${\mathscr{C}}(A)$ conditioned to $A$ being feasible and provide an upper bound on the distribution function in the infeasible case. Using these results, we show that $\mathbf{E}(\ln{\mathscr{C}}(A))\le2\ln(m+1)+3.31$ for all $n>m$, the sharpest bound for this expectancy as of today. Both agendas are related through a result which translates between coverage and condition.
  • We perform a smoothed analysis of the GCC-condition number C(A) of the linear programming feasibility problem \exists x\in\R^{m+1} Ax < 0. Suppose that \bar{A} is any matrix with rows \bar{a_i} of euclidean norm 1 and, independently for all i, let a_i be a random perturbation of \bar{a_i} following the uniform distribution in the spherical disk in S^m of angular radius \arcsin\sigma and centered at \bar{a_i}. We prove that E(\ln C(A)) = O(mn / \sigma). A similar result was shown for Renegar's condition number and Gaussian perturbations by Dunagan, Spielman, and Teng [arXiv:cs.DS/0302011]. Our result is robust in the sense that it easily extends to radially symmetric probability distributions supported on a spherical disk of radius \arcsin\sigma, whose density may even have a singularity at the center of the perturbation. Our proofs combine ideas from a recent paper of B\"urgisser, Cucker, and Lotz (Math. Comp. 77, No. 263, 2008) with techniques of Dunagan et al.