• Cosmic acceleration is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades. Testing and distinguishing among possible explanations requires cosmological measurements of extremely high precision probing the full history of cosmic expansion and structure growth and, ideally, compare and contrast matter and relativistic tracers of the gravity potential. This program is one of the defining objectives of the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST), as set forth in the New Worlds, New Horizons report (NWNH) in 2010. The WFIRST mission has the ability to improve these measurements by 1-2 orders of magnitude compared to the current state of the art, while simultaneously extending their redshift grasp, greatly improving control of systematic effects, and taking a unified approach to multiple probes that provide complementary physical information and cross-checks of cosmological results. We describe in this annual report the activities of the Science Investigation Team (SIT) "Cosmology with the High Latitude Survey (HLS)" during the year 2017. This team was selected by NASA in December 2015 in order to address the stringent challenges of the WFIRST dark energy (DE) program through the Project's formulation phase. This SIT has elected to jointly address Galaxy Redshift Survey, Weak Lensing and Cluster Growth and thus fully embrace the fact that the imaging and spectroscopic elements of the HLS will be realized as an integrated observing program, and they jointly impose requirements on performance and operations. WFIRST is designed to be able to deliver a definitive result on the origin of cosmic acceleration. It is not optimized for Figure of Merit sensitivity but for control of systematic uncertainties and for having multiple techniques each with multiple cross-checks. Our SIT work focuses on understanding the potential systematics in the WFIRST DE measurements.
  • We present an empirical parameterization of the [NII]/H$\alpha$ flux ratio as a function of stellar mass and redshift valid at 0 < z < 2.7 and 8.5 < log(M) < 11.0. This description can easily be applied to (i) simulations for modeling [NII]$\lambda6584$ line emission, (ii) deblend [NII] and H$\alpha$ in current low-resolution grism and narrow-band observations to derive intrinsic H$\alpha$ fluxes, and (iii) to reliably forecast the number counts of H$\alpha$ emission-line galaxies for future surveys, such as those planned for Euclid and the Wide Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST). Our model combines the evolution of the locus on the Baldwin, Phillips & Terlevich (BPT) diagram measured in spectroscopic data out to z = 2.5 with the strong dependence of [NII]/H$\alpha$ on stellar mass and [OIII]/H$\beta$ observed in local galaxy samples. We find large variations in the [NII]/H$\alpha$ flux ratio at a fixed redshift due to its dependency on stellar mass; hence, the assumption of a constant [NII] flux contamination fraction can lead to a significant under- or overestimate of H$\alpha$ luminosities. Specifically, measurements of the intrinsic H$\alpha$ luminosity function derived from current low-resolution grism spectroscopy assuming a constant 29% contamination of [NII] can be overestimated by factors of ~8 at log(L) > 43.0 for galaxies at redshifts z = 1.5. This has implications for the prediction of H$\alpha$ emitters for Euclid and WFIRST. We also study the impact of blended H$\alpha$ and [NII] on the accuracy of measured spectroscopic redshifts.
  • We present a multi-wavelength catalog in the Subaru-XMM Deep Field (SXDF) as part of the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH). We include the newly acquired optical data from the Hyper-Suprime Cam Subaru Strategic Program, accompanied by IRAC coverage from the SPLASH survey. All available optical and near-infrared data is homogenized and resampled on a common astrometric reference frame. Source detection is done using a multi-wavelength detection image including the $u$-band to recover the bluest objects. We measure multi-wavelength photometry and compute photometric redshifts as well as stellar masses for $\sim$1.17 million objects over $\sim$4.2 deg$^2$ with $\sim$800,000 objects in the 2.4 deg$^2$ HSC-UltraDeep coverage. Using the available spectroscopic redshifts from various surveys over the range of $0<z<6$, we verify the performance of the photometric redshifts and we find a normalized median absolute deviation of 0.023 and outlier fraction of 3.2%. The SPLASH-SXDF catalog is a valuable, publicly available resource that is perfectly suited for studying galaxies in the early universe and tracing their evolution through cosmic time. The catalog is available for download from https://z.umn.edu/SXDF .
  • We carried out targeted ALMA observations of 129 fields in the COSMOS region at 1.25 mm, detecting 152 galaxies at S/N$\geq$5 with an average continuum RMS of 150 $\mu$Jy. These fields represent a S/N-limited sample of AzTEC / ASTE sources with 1.1 mm S/N$\geq$4 over an area of 0.72 square degrees. Given ALMA's fine resolution and the exceptional spectroscopic and multiwavelength photometric data available in COSMOS, this survey allows us unprecedented power in identifying submillimeter galaxy counterparts and determining their redshifts through spectroscopic or photometric means. In addition to 30 sources with prior spectroscopic redshifts, we identified redshifts for 113 galaxies through photometric methods and an additional nine sources with lower limits, which allowed a statistically robust determination of the redshift distribution. We have resolved 33 AzTEC sources into multi-component systems and our redshifts suggest that nine are likely to be physically associated. Our overall redshift distribution peaks at $z\sim$2.0 with a high redshift tail skewing the median redshift to $\tilde{z}$=2.48$\pm$0.05. We find that brighter millimeter sources are preferentially found at higher redshifts. Our faintest sources, with S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$<1.25 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=2.18$\pm$0.09, while the brightest sources, S$_{1.25 \rm mm}$>1.8 mJy, have a median redshift of $\tilde{z}$=3.08$\pm$0.17. After accounting for spectral energy distribution shape and selection effects these results are consistent with several previous submillimeter galaxy surveys, and moreover, support the conclusion that the submillimeter galaxy redshift distribution is sensitive to survey depth.
  • A key goal of the Stage IV dark energy experiments Euclid, LSST and WFIRST is to measure the growth of structure with cosmic time from weak lensing analysis over large regions of the sky. Weak lensing cosmology will be challenging: in addition to highly accurate galaxy shape measurements, statistically robust and accurate photometric redshift (photo-z) estimates for billions of faint galaxies will be needed in order to reconstruct the three-dimensional matter distribution. Here we present an overview of and initial results from the Complete Calibration of the Color-Redshift Relation (C3R2) survey, designed specifically to calibrate the empirical galaxy color-redshift relation to the Euclid depth. These redshifts will also be important for the calibrations of LSST and WFIRST. The C3R2 survey is obtaining multiplexed observations with Keck (DEIMOS, LRIS, and MOSFIRE), the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC; OSIRIS), and the Very Large Telescope (VLT; FORS2 and KMOS) of a targeted sample of galaxies most important for the redshift calibration. We focus spectroscopic efforts on under-sampled regions of galaxy color space identified in previous work in order to minimize the number of spectroscopic redshifts needed to map the color-redshift relation to the required accuracy. Here we present the C3R2 survey strategy and initial results, including the 1283 high confidence redshifts obtained in the 2016A semester and released as Data Release 1.
  • We combine star formation along the `main sequence', quiescence, and clustering and merging to produce an empirical model for the evolution of individual galaxies. Main sequence star formation alone would significantly steepen the stellar mass function towards low redshift, in sharp conflict with observation. However, a combination of star formation and merging produces a consistent result for correct choice of the merger rate function. As a result, we are motivated to propose a model in which hierarchical merging is disconnected from environmentally-independent star formation. This model can be tested via correlation functions and would produce new constraints on clustering and merging.
  • Euclid is a Europe-led cosmology space mission dedicated to a visible and near infrared survey of the entire extra-galactic sky. Its purpose is to deepen our knowledge of the dark content of our Universe. After an overview of the Euclid mission and science, this contribution describes how the community is getting organized to face the data analysis challenges, both in software development and in operational data processing matters. It ends with a more specific account of some of the main contributions of the Swiss Science Data Center (SDC-CH).
  • We present a structural study of 182 obscured Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs) at z<=1.5, selected in the COSMOS field from their extreme infrared to X-ray luminosity ratio and their negligible emission at optical wavelengths. We fit optical to far-infrared spectral energy distributions and analyze deep HST imaging to derive the physical and morphological properties of their host galaxies. We find that such galaxies are more compact than normal star-forming sources at similar redshift and stellar mass, and we show that it is not an observational bias related to the emission of the AGN. Based on the distribution of their UVJ colors, we also argue that this increased compactness is not due to the additional contribution of a passive bulge. We thus postulate that a vast majority of obscured AGNs reside in galaxies undergoing dynamical compaction, similar to processes recently invoked to explain the formation of compact star-forming sources at high redshift.
  • We present, for the first time, the local [CII] 158 um emission line luminosity function measured using a sample of more than 500 galaxies from the Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). [CII] luminosities are measured from the Herschel PACS observations of the Luminous Infrared Galaxies in the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) and estimated for the rest of the sample based on the far-IR luminosity and color. The sample covers 91.3% of the sky and is complete at S_60 um > 5.24 Jy. We calculated the completeness as a function of [CII] line luminosity and distance, based on the far-IR color and flux densities. The [CII] luminosity function is constrained in the range ~10^(7-9) (Lo) from both the 1/V_max and a maximum likelihood methods. The shape of our derived [CII] emission line luminosity function agrees well with the IR luminosity function. For the CO(1-0) and [CII] luminosity functions to agree, we propose a varying ratio of [CII]/CO(1-0) as a function of CO luminosity, with larger ratios for fainter CO luminosities. Limited [CII] high redshift observations as well as estimates based on the IR and UV luminosity functions are suggestive of an evolution in the [CII] luminosity function similar to the evolution trend of the cosmic star formation rate density. Deep surveys using ALMA with full capability will be able to confirm this prediction.
  • We characterise the physical nature of a 1.1 mm-selected, flux-limited, and interferometrically followed up sample of SMGs in COSMOS. We used the MAGPHYS code to fit the multiwavelength (UV-radio) SEDs of 16 of the target SMGs. We also constructed the pure radio SEDs of our SMGs using three different radio bands (325 MHz, 1.4 GHz, and 3 GHz). Moreover, since two SMGs in our sample, AzTEC1 and AzTEC3, benefit from previous CO line observations, we studied their properties in more detail. We found that 63% of our target SMGs lie above the galaxy main-sequence by more than a factor of 3, and hence are starbursts. The 3 GHz radio sizes we have previously measured for the target SMGs were compared with the present stellar mass estimates, and we found that the z>3 SMGs are fairly consistent with the mass-size relationship of z~2 compact, quiescent galaxies (cQGs). The median IR-radio correlation parameter is found to be q=2.27, which is lower than measured locally (median q=2.64). AzTEC1 is found to have a sub-Eddington SFR surface density (by a factor of 2.6), while AzTEC3 appears to be an Eddington-limited starburster. The gas reservoir in these two high-z SMGs would be exhausted in only ~86 and 19 Myr at the current SFR, respectively. A comparison of the MAGPHYS-based properties of our SMGs with those of equally bright ALESS SMGs suggests that the two populations share fairly similar physical characteristics, including the q parameter. A hint of negative correlation is found between the 3 GHz size and the level of starburstiness, and hence cosmic-ray electrons in more compact starbursts might be more susceptible to free-free absorption. Some of the derived low and high q values (compared to the local median) could be the result of a specific merger/post-starburst phase of galaxy evolution. Overall, our results support the scenario where z>3 SMGs evolve into today's giant ellipticals.
  • We examine the repeatability, reliability, and accuracy of differential exoplanet eclipse depth measurements made using the InfraRed Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope during the post-cryogenic mission. We have re-analyzed an existing 4.5 {\mu}m data set, consisting of 10 observations of the XO-3b system during secondary eclipse, using seven different techniques for removing correlated noise. We find that, on average, for a given technique, the eclipse depth estimate is repeatable from epoch to epoch to within 156 parts per million (ppm). Most techniques derive eclipse depths that do not vary by more than a factor 3 of the photon noise limit. All methods but one accurately assess their own errors: for these methods, the individual measurement uncertainties are comparable to the scatter in eclipse depths over the 10 epoch sample. To assess the accuracy of the techniques as well as to clarify the difference between instrumental and other sources of measurement error, we have also analyzed a simulated data set of 10 visits to XO-3b, for which the eclipse depth is known. We find that three of the methods (BLISS mapping, Pixel Level Decorrelation, and Independent Component Analysis) obtain results that are within three times the photon limit of the true eclipse depth. When averaged over the 10 epoch ensemble, 5 out of 7 techniques come within 60 ppm of the true value. Spitzer exoplanet data, if obtained following current best practices and reduced using methods such as those described here, can measure repeatable and accurate single eclipse depths, with close to photon-limited results.
  • Stellar streams have become central to studies of the interaction histories of nearby galaxies. To characterize the most prominent parts of the stellar stream around the well-known nearby (d = 17 Mpc) edge-on disk galaxy NGC 5907, we have obtained and analyzed new, deep gri Subaru/Suprime-Cam and 3.6 micron Spitzer/Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) observations. Combining the near-infrared 3.6 micron data with visible-light images allows us to use a long wavelength baseline to estimate the metallicity and age of the stellar population along a ~60 kpc long segment of the stream. We have fitted the stellar spectral energy distribution (SED) with a single-burst stellar population synthesis model and we use it to distinguish between the proposed satellite accretion and minor/major merger formation models of the stellar stream around this galaxy. We conclude that a massive minor merger (stellar mass ratio of at least 1:8) can best account for the metallicity of -0.3 inferred along the brightest parts of the stream.
  • SPHEREx is a proposed SMEX mission selected for Phase A. SPHEREx will carry out the first all-sky spectral survey and provide for every 6.2" pixel a spectra between 0.75 and 4.18 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$41.4] and 4.18 and 5.00 $\mu$m [with R$\sim$135]. The SPHEREx team has proposed three specific science investigations to be carried out with this unique data set: cosmic inflation, interstellar and circumstellar ices, and the extra-galactic background light. It is readily apparent, however, that many other questions in astrophysics and planetary sciences could be addressed with the SPHEREx data. The SPHEREx team convened a community workshop in February 2016, with the intent of enlisting the aid of a larger group of scientists in defining these questions. This paper summarizes the rich and varied menu of investigations that was laid out. It includes studies of the composition of main belt and Trojan/Greek asteroids; mapping the zodiacal light with unprecedented spatial and spectral resolution; identifying and studying very low-metallicity stars; improving stellar parameters in order to better characterize transiting exoplanets; studying aliphatic and aromatic carbon-bearing molecules in the interstellar medium; mapping star formation rates in nearby galaxies; determining the redshift of clusters of galaxies; identifying high redshift quasars over the full sky; and providing a NIR spectrum for most eROSITA X-ray sources. All of these investigations, and others not listed here, can be carried out with the nominal all-sky spectra to be produced by SPHEREx. In addition, the workshop defined enhanced data products and user tools which would facilitate some of these scientific studies. Finally, the workshop noted the high degrees of synergy between SPHEREx and a number of other current or forthcoming programs, including JWST, WFIRST, Euclid, GAIA, K2/Kepler, TESS, eROSITA and LSST.
  • Highly accurate models of the galaxy population over cosmological volumes are necessary in order to predict the performance of upcoming cosmological missions. We present a data-driven model of the galaxy population constrained by deep 0.1-8 $\rm \mu m$ imaging and spectroscopic data in the COSMOS survey, with the immediate goal of simulating the spectroscopic redshift performance of the proposed SPHEREx mission. SPHEREx will obtain over the full-sky $R\sim41$ spectrophotometry at moderate spatial resolution ($\sim6"$) over the wavelength range 0.75-4.18 $\rm \mu m$ and $R\sim135$ over the wavelength range 4.18-5 $\rm \mu m$. We show that our simulation accurately reproduces a range of known galaxy properties, encapsulating the full complexity of the galaxy population and enables realistic, full end-to-end simulations to predict mission performance. Finally, we discuss potential applications of the simulation framework to future cosmology missions and give a description of released data products.
  • The most prodigious starburst galaxies are absent in massive galaxy clusters today, but their connection with large scale environments is less clear at $z\gtrsim2$. We present a search of large scale structure around a galaxy cluster core at $z=2.095$ using a set of spectroscopically confirmed galaxies. We find that both color-selected star-forming galaxies (SFGs) and dusty star-forming galaxies (DSFGs) show significant overdensities around the $z=2.095$ cluster. A total of 8 DSFGs (including 3 X-ray luminous active galactic nuclei, AGNs) and 34 SFGs are found within a 10 arcmin radius (corresponds to $\sim$15 cMpc at $z\sim2.1$) from the cluster center and within a redshift range of $\Delta z=0.02$, which leads to galaxy overdensities of $\delta_{\rm DSFG}\sim12.3$ and $\delta_{\rm SFG}\sim2.8$. The cluster core and the extended DSFG- and SFG-rich structure together demonstrate an active cluster formation phase, in which the cluster is accreting a significant amount of material from large scale structure while the more mature core may begin to virialize. Our finding of this DSFG-rich structure, along with a number of other protoclusters with excess DSFGs and AGNs found to date, suggest that the overdensities of these rare sources indeed trace significant mass overdensities. However, it remains puzzling how these intense star formers are triggered concurrently. Although an increased probability of galaxy interactions and/or enhanced gas supply can trigger the excess of DSFGs, our stacking analysis based on 850 $\mu$m images and morphological analysis based on rest-frame optical imaging do not show such enhancements of merger fraction and gas content in this structure.
  • The offset of high redshift star-forming galaxies in the [OIII]/H$\beta$ versus [NII]/H$\alpha$ (O3N2) diagram in comparison with the local star-forming galaxy sequence is now well established. The physical origin of the shift is the subject of some debate, and has important implications for metallicity measurements based on strong lines at all redshifts. To investigate the origin of the O3N2 offset, we use a sample of ~100,000 star-forming galaxies from SDSS DR12 to probe the empirical correlations between emission line diagnostics and measurable galaxy physical properties. In particular, we examine how surface density of star formation, ionization parameter, nitrogen-to-oxygen (N/O) ratio, and stellar mass drive position in two key diagnostic diagrams: O3N2 and [OIII]/H$\beta$ versus [SII]/H$\alpha$ (O3S2). We show that, at fixed [OIII]/H$\beta$, galaxies falling closer to the high-redshift locus in O3N2 have higher star formation density, stellar mass and N/O ratios. We also find a tight correspondence in the distributions of stellar mass and N/O in the diagnostic diagrams. This relation, spanning a range of galaxy evolutionary states, suggests that the N/O-$M_{*}$ relation is more fundamental than the N/O-metallicity relation. We argue that a tight N/O-$M_{*}$ relation is well-motivated physically, and that the observed correlation of N/O with O/H in the local universe is primarily a reflection of the existence of the mass-metallicity relation. Because the mass-metallicity relation evolves much more rapidly with redshift than N/O-$M_{*}$, the N/O ratios of high redshift galaxies are significantly elevated in comparison with local galaxies with the same gas-phase O/H. The O3N2 shift and elevated N/O ratios observed in high redshift galaxies therefore come about as a natural consequence of the N/O-$M_{*}$ relation combined with the evolution of the mass-metallicity relation.
  • We study the effects of local environment and stellar mass on galaxy properties using a mass complete sample of quiescent and star-forming systems in the COSMOS field at $z\lesssim$ 3. We show that at $z\lesssim$ 1, the median star-formation rate (SFR) and specific SFR (sSFR) of all galaxies depend on environment, but they become independent of environment at $z\gtrsim$ 1. However, we find that only for \textit{star-forming} galaxies, the median SFR and sSFR are similar in different environments, regardless of redshift and stellar mass. We find that the quiescent fraction depends on environment at $z\lesssim$ 1, and on stellar mass out to $z\sim$ 3. We show that at $z\lesssim$ 1, galaxies become quiescent faster in denser environments and that the overall environmental quenching efficiency increases with cosmic time. Environmental and mass quenching processes depend on each other. At $z\lesssim$ 1, denser environments more efficiently quench galaxies with higher masses (log($M/M_{\odot}$)$\gtrsim$ 10.7), possibly due to a higher merger rate of massive galaxies in denser environments, and that mass quenching is more efficient in denser regions. We show that the overall mass quenching efficiency ($\epsilon_{mass}$) for more massive galaxies (log($M/M_{\odot}$)$\gtrsim$ 10.2) rises with cosmic time until $z\sim$ 1 and flattens out since then. However, for less massive galaxies, the rise in $\epsilon_{mass}$ continues to the present time. Our results suggest that environmental quenching is only relevant at $z\lesssim$ 1, likely a fast process, whereas mass quenching is the dominant mechanism at $z\gtrsim$ 1, with a possible stellar feedback physics.
  • The current hierarchical merging paradigm and $\Lambda$CDM predict that the $z \sim 4-8$ universe should be a time in which the most massive galaxies are transitioning from their initial halo assembly to the later baryonic evolution seen in star-forming galaxies and quasars. However, no evidence of this transition has been found in many high redshift galaxy surveys including CFHTLS, CANDELS and SPLASH, the first studies to probe the high-mass end at these redshifts. Indeed, if halo mass to stellar mass ratios estimated at lower-redshift continue to $z \sim 6-8$, CANDELS and SPLASH report several orders of magnitude more $M \sim 10^{12-13} M_\odot$ halos than are possible to have formed by those redshifts, implying these massive galaxies formed impossibly early. We consider various systematics in the stellar synthesis models used to estimate physical parameters and possible galaxy formation scenarios in an effort to reconcile observation with theory. Although known uncertainties can greatly reduce the disparity between recent observations and cold dark matter merger simulations, even taking the most conservative view of the observations, there remains considerable tension with current theory.
  • Calibrating the photometric redshifts of >10^9 galaxies for upcoming weak lensing cosmology experiments is a major challenge for the astrophysics community. The path to obtaining the required spectroscopic redshifts for training and calibration is daunting, given the anticipated depths of the surveys and the difficulty in obtaining secure redshifts for some faint galaxy populations. Here we present an analysis of the problem based on the self-organizing map, a method of mapping the distribution of data in a high-dimensional space and projecting it onto a lower-dimensional representation. We apply this method to existing photometric data from the COSMOS survey selected to approximate the anticipated Euclid weak lensing sample, enabling us to robustly map the empirical distribution of galaxies in the multidimensional color space defined by the expected Euclid filters. Mapping this multicolor distribution lets us determine where - in galaxy color space - redshifts from current spectroscopic surveys exist and where they are systematically missing. Crucially, the method lets us determine whether a spectroscopic training sample is representative of the full photometric space occupied by the galaxies in a survey. We explore optimal sampling techniques and estimate the additional spectroscopy needed to map out the color-redshift relation, finding that sampling the galaxy distribution in color space in a systematic way can efficiently meet the calibration requirements. While the analysis presented here focuses on the Euclid survey, similar analysis can be applied to other surveys facing the same calibration challenge, such as DES, LSST, and WFIRST.
  • SPHEREx (Spectro-Photometer for the History of the Universe, Epoch of Reionization, and Ices Explorer) ( http://spherex.caltech.edu ) is a proposed all-sky spectroscopic survey satellite designed to address all three science goals in NASA's Astrophysics Division: probe the origin and destiny of our Universe; explore whether planets around other stars could harbor life; and explore the origin and evolution of galaxies. SPHEREx will scan a series of Linear Variable Filters systematically across the entire sky. The SPHEREx data set will contain R=40 spectra fir 0.75$<\lambda<$4.1$\mu$m and R=150 spectra for 4.1$<\lambda<$4.8$\mu$m for every 6.2 arc second pixel over the entire-sky. In this paper, we detail the extra-galactic and cosmological studies SPHEREx will enable and present detailed systematic effect evaluations. We also outline the Ice and Galaxy Evolution Investigations.
  • We used the PdBI to map a sample of 15 SMGs in the COSMOS field at the wavelength of 1.3 mm. The target SMGs were originally discovered in the JCMT/AzTEC 1.1 mm continuum survey at S/N=4-4.5. This paper presents, for the first time, interferometric millimetre-wavelength observations of these sources. The angular resolution of our observations, 1.8", allowed us to accurately determine the positions of the target SMGs. Using a detection threshold of S/N>4.5 regardless of multiwavelength counterpart association, and 4<S/N<=4.5 if a multiwavelength counterpart within 1.5" is also present, the total number of detections in our survey is 22. Three of our detected SMGs (AzTEC21, 27, and 28; which corresponds to 20%) are marginally resolved at our angular resolution, and these sources are found to have elongated or clumpy morphologies and/or multiple components. Using optical to NIR photometric redshifts, available spectroscopic redshifts, and redshifts estimated from the radio-to-submm spectral index we infer a median redshift of $\tilde{z}=3.20\pm0.25$ for our sample. To study the overall multiplicity and redshift distribution of flux-limited samples of SMGs we combined these sources with the 15 brightest AzTEC SMGs detected at 1.1 mm, AzTEC1-15, and studied previously. This constitutes a complete, flux- and S/N-limited 1.1-mm selected sample. We find that the median redshift for the 15 brightest AzTEC SMGs ($\tilde{z}=3.05\pm0.44$) is consistent with that for AzTEC16-30. This conforms to recent observational findings that SMGs do not exhibit any significant trend between the redshift and (sub)mm flux density. For the combined AzTEC1-30 sample we derive a median redshift of $\tilde{z}=3.17\pm0.27$, consistent with previous results based on mm-selected samples. We further infer that within the combined AzTEC1-30 sample $\sim25\pm9\%$ of sources separate into multiple components.
  • The relationship between galaxy star formation rates (SFR) and stellar masses ($M_\ast$) is re-examined using a mass-selected sample of $\sim$62,000 star-forming galaxies at $z \le 1.3$ in the COSMOS 2-deg$^2$ field. Using new far-infrared photometry from $Herschel$-PACS and SPIRE and $Spitzer$-MIPS 24 $\mu$m, along with derived infrared luminosities from the NRK method based on galaxies' locations in the restframe color-color diagram $(NUV - r)$ vs. $(r - K)$, we are able to more accurately determine total SFRs for our complete sample. At all redshifts, the relationship between median $SFR$ and $M_\ast$ follows a power-law at low stellar masses, and flattens to nearly constant SFR at high stellar masses. We describe a new parameterization that provides the best fit to the main sequence and characterizes the low mass power-law slope, turnover mass, and overall scaling. The turnover in the main sequence occurs at a characteristic mass of about $M_{0} \sim 10^{10} M_{\odot}$ at all redshifts. The low mass power-law slope ranges from 0.9-1.3 and the overall scaling rises in SFR as a function of $(1+z)^{4.12 \pm 0.10}$. A broken power-law fit below and above the turnover mass gives relationships of $SFR \propto M_{*}^{0.88 \pm 0.06}$ below the turnover mass and $SFR \propto M_{*}^{0.27 \pm 0.04}$ above the turnover mass. Galaxies more massive than $M_\ast \gtrsim 10^{10}\ M_{\rm \odot}$ have on average, a much lower specific star formation rate (sSFR) than would be expected by simply extrapolating the traditional linear fit to the main sequence found for less massive galaxies.
  • We use observed optical to near infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 266 galaxies in the COSMOS survey to derive the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation at high redshift. All of the galaxies have spectroscopic redshifts in the range z = 2 to 6.5. The presence of the CIV absorption feature, indicating that the rest-frame UV-optical SED is dominated by OB stars, is used to select objects for which the intrinsic, unattenuated spectrum has a well-established shape. Comparison of this intrinsic spectrum with the observed broadband photometric SED then permits derivation of the wavelength dependence of the dust attenuation. The derived dust attenuation curve is similar in overall shape to the Calzetti curve for local starburst galaxies. We also see the 2175 \AA~bump feature which is present in the Milky Way and LMC extinction curves but not seen in the Calzetti curve. The bump feature is commonly attributed to graphite or PAHs. No significant dependence is seen with redshift between sub-samples at z = 2 - 4 and z = 4 - 6.5. The 'extinction' curve obtained here provides a firm basis for color and extinction corrections of high redshift galaxy photometry.
  • Limited studies have been performed on the radio-loud fraction in X-ray selected type 1 AGN samples. The consistency between various radio-loudness definitions also needs to be checked. We measure the radio-loudness of the 407 type 1 AGNs in the XMM-COSMOS quasar sample using nine criteria from the literature (six defined in the rest-frame and three defined in the observed frame): $R_L=\log(L_{5GHz}/L_B)$, $q_{24}=\log(L_{24\mu m}/L_{1.4GHz})$, $R_{uv}=\log(L_{5GHz}/L_{2500\AA})$, $R_{i}=\log(L_{1.4GHz}/L_i)$, $R_X=\log(\nu L_{\nu}(5GHz)/L_X)$, $P_{5GHz}=\log(P_{5GHz}(W/Hz/Sr))$, $R_{L,obs}=\log(f_{1.4GHz}/f_B)$ (observed frame), $R_{i,obs}=\log(f_{1.4GHz}/f_i)$ (observed frame), and $q_{24, obs}=\log(f_{24\mu m}/f_{1.4GHz})$ (observed frame). Using any single criterion defined in the rest-frame, we find a low radio-loud fraction of $\lesssim 5\%$ in the XMM-COSMOS type 1 AGN sample, except for $R_{uv}$. Requiring that any two criteria agree reduces the radio-loud fraction to $\lesssim 2\%$ for about 3/4 of the cases. The low radio-loud fraction cannot be simply explained by the contribution of the host galaxy luminosity and reddening. The $P_{5GHz}=\log(P_{5GHz}(W/Hz/Sr))$ gives the smallest radio-loud fraction. Two of the three radio-loud fractions from the criteria defined in the observed frame without k-correction ($R_{L,obs}$ and $R_{i,obs}$) are much larger than the radio-loud fractions from other criteria.
  • Using the first 50% of data collected for the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLASH) observations on the 1.8 deg$^2$ Cosmological Evolution Survey (COSMOS) we estimate the masses and star formation rates of 3398 $M_*>10^{10}M_\odot $ star-forming galaxies at $4 < z < 6$ with a substantial population up to $M_* \gtrsim 10^{11.5} M_\odot$. We find that the strong correlation between stellar mass and star formation rate seen at lower redshift (the "main sequence" of star-forming galaxies) extends to $z\sim6$. The observed relation and scatter is consistent with a continued increase in star formation rate at fixed mass in line with extrapolations from lower-redshift observations. It is difficult to explain this continued correlation, especially for the most massive systems, unless the most massive galaxies are forming stars near their Eddington-limited rate from their first collapse. Furthermore, we find no evidence for moderate quenching at higher masses, indicating quenching either has not occurred prior to $z \sim 6$ or else occurs rapidly, so that few galaxies are visible in transition between star-forming and quenched.