• The position-dependent power spectrum has been recently proposed as a descriptor of gravitationally induced non-Gaussianity in galaxy clustering, as it is sensitive to the "soft limit" of the bispectrum (i.e. when one of the wave number tends to zero). We generalise this concept to higher order and clarify their relationship to other known statistics such as the skew-spectrum, the kurt-spectra and their real-space counterparts the cumulants correlators. Using the {\em Hierarchical Ansatz} (HA) as a toy model for the higher order correlation hierarchy, we show how in the soft limit, polyspectra at a given order can be identified with lower order polyspectra with the same geometrical dependence but with {\em renormalised} amplitudes expressed in terms of amplitudes of the original polyspectra. We extend the concept of position-dependent bispectrum to bispectrum of the divergence of the velocity field $\Theta$ and mixed multispectra involving $\delta$ and $\Theta$ in the 3D perturbative regime. To quantify the effects of transients in numerical simulations, we also present results for lowest order in Lagrangian perturbation theory (LPT) or the Zel'dovich approximation (ZA). Finally, we discuss how to extend the position-dependent spectrum concept to encompass cross-spectra. And finally study the application of this concept to two dimensions (2D), for projected galaxy maps, convergence $\kappa$ maps from weak-lensing surveys or maps of CMB secondaries e.g. the frequency cleaned $y$ - parameter maps of thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect from CMB surveys.
  • We explore the dynamical behaviour of cosmological models involving a scalar field (with an exponential potential and a canonical kinetic term) and a matter fluid with spatial curvature included in the equations of motion. Using appropriately defined parameters to describe the evolution of the scalar field energy in this situation, we find that there are two extra fixed points that are not present in the case without curvature. We also analyse the evolution of the effective equation-of-state parameter for different initial values of the curvature.
  • We study Modified Gravity (MG) theories by modelling the redshifted matter power spectrum in a spherical Fourier-Bessel (sFB) basis. We use a fully non-linear description of the real-space matter power-spectrum and include the lowest-order redshift-space correction (Kaiser effect), taking into account some additional non-linear contributions. Ignoring relativistic corrections, which are not expected to play an important role for a shallow survey, we analyse two different modified gravity scenarios, namely the generalised Dilaton scalar-tensor theories and the $f({R})$ models in the large curvature regime. We compute the 3D power spectrum ${\cal C}^s_{\ell}(k_1,k_2)$ for various such MG theories with and without redshift space distortions, assuming precise knowledge of background cosmological parameters. Using an all-sky spectroscopic survey with Gaussian selection function $\varphi(r)\propto \exp(-{r^2 / r^2_0})$, $r_0 = 150 \, h^{-1} \, {\textrm{Mpc}}$, and number density of galaxies $\bar {\textrm{N}} =10^{-4}\;{\textrm{Mpc}}^{-3}$, we use a $\chi^2$ analysis, and find that the lower-order $(\ell \leq 25)$ multipoles of ${\cal C}^s_\ell(k,k')$ (with radial modes restricted to $k < 0.2 \, h \,{\textrm{Mpc}}^{-1}$) can constraint the parameter $f_{R_0}$ at a level of $2\times 10^{-5} (3\times 10^{-5})$ with $3 \sigma$ confidence for $n=1(2)$. Combining constraints from higher $\ell > 25$ modes can further reduce the error bars and thus in principle make cosmological gravity constraints competitive with solar system tests. However this will require an accurate modelling of non-linear redshift space distortions. Using a tomographic $\beta(a)$-$m(a)$ parameterization we also derive constraints on specific parameters describing the Dilaton models of modified gravity.
  • We use the cosmic shear data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey to place constraints on $f(R)$ and {\it Generalized Dilaton} models of modified gravity. This is highly complimentary to other probes since the constraints mainly come from the non-linear scales: maximal deviations with respects to the General-Relativity + $\Lambda$CDM scenario occurs at $k\sim1 h \mbox{Mpc}^{-1}$. At these scales, it becomes necessary to account for known degeneracies with baryon feedback and massive neutrinos, hence we place constraints jointly on these three physical effects. To achieve this, we formulate these modified gravity theories within a common tomographic parameterization, we compute their impact on the clustering properties relative to a GR universe, and propagate the observed modifications into the weak lensing $\xi_{\pm}$ quantity. Confronted against the cosmic shear data, we reject the $f(R)$ $\{ |f_{R_0}|=10^{-4}, n=1\}$ model with more than 99.9% confidence interval (CI) when assuming a $\Lambda$CDM dark matter only model. In the presence of baryonic feedback processes and massive neutrinos with total mass up to 0.2eV, the model is disfavoured with at least 94% CI in all different combinations studied. Constraints on the $\{ |f_{R_0}|=10^{-4}, n=2\}$ model are weaker, but nevertheless disfavoured with at least 89% CI. We identify several specific combinations of neutrino mass, baryon feedback and $f(R)$ or Dilaton gravity models that are excluded by the current cosmic shear data. Notably, universes with three massless neutrinos and no baryon feedback are strongly disfavoured in all modified gravity scenarios studied. These results indicate that competitive constraints may be achieved with future cosmic shear data.
  • We present novel statistical tools to cross-correlate frequency cleaned thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) maps and tomographic weak lensing (wl) convergence maps. Moving beyond the lowest order cross-correlation, we introduce a hierarchy of mixed higher-order statistics, the cumulants and cumulant correlators, to analyze non-Gaussianity in real space, as well as corresponding polyspectra in the harmonic domain. Using these moments, we derive analytical expressions for the joint two-point probability distribution function (2PDF) for smoothed tSZ (y_s) and convergence (\kappa_s) maps. The presence of tomographic information allows us to study the evolution of higher order {\em mixed} tSZ-weak lensing statistics with redshift. We express the joint PDFs p_{\kappa y}(\kappa_s,y_s) in terms of individual one-point PDFs (p_{\kappa}(\kappa_s), p_y(y_s)) and the relevant bias functions (b_{\kappa}(\kappa_s), b_y(y_s)). Analytical results for two different regimes are presented that correspond to the small and large angular smoothing scales. Results are also obtained for corresponding {\em hot spots} in the tSZ and convergence maps. In addition to results based on hierarchical techniques and perturbative methods, we present results of calculations based on the lognormal approximation. The analytical expressions derived here are generic and applicable to cross-correlation studies of arbitrary tracers of large scale structure including e.g. that of tSZ and soft X-ray background.
  • Motivated by recent suggestions that a number of observed galaxy clusters have masses which are too high for their given redshift to occur naturally in a standard model cosmology, we use Extreme Value Statistics to construct confidence regions in the mass-redshift plane for the most extreme objects expected in the universe. We show how such a diagram not only provides a way of potentially ruling out the concordance cosmology, but also allows us to differentiate between alternative models of enhanced structure formation. We compare our theoretical prediction with observations, placing currently observed high and low redshift clusters on a mass-redshift diagram and find -- provided we consider the full sky to avoid a posteriori selection effects -- that none are in significant tension with concordance cosmology.
  • We generalize the concept of the ordinary skew-spectrum to probe the effect of non-Gaussianity on the morphology of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) maps in several domains: in real-space (where they are commonly known as cumulant-correlators), and in harmonic and needlet bases. The essential aim is to retain more information than normally contained in these statistics, in order to assist in determining the source of any measured non-Gaussianity, in the same spirit as Munshi & Heavens (2010) skew-spectra were used to identify foreground contaminants to the CMB bispectrum in Planck data. Using a perturbative series to construct the Minkowski Functionals (MFs), we provide a pseudo-Cl based approach in both harmonic and needlet representations to estimate these spectra in the presence of a mask and inhomogeneous noise. Assuming homogeneous noise we present approx- imate expressions for error covariance for the purpose of joint estimation of these spectra. We present specific results for four different models of primordial non-Gaussianity local, equilateral, orthogonal and enfolded models, as well as non-Gaussianity caused by unsubtracted point sources. Closed form results of next-order corrections to MFs too are obtained in terms of a quadruplet of kurt-spectra. We also use the method of modal decomposition of the bispectrum and trispectrum to reconstruct the MFs as an alternative method of reconstruction of morphological properties of CMB maps. Finally, we introduce the odd-parity skew-spectra to probe the odd-parity bispectrum and its impact on the morphology of the CMB sky. Although developed for the CMB, the generic results obtained here can be useful in other areas of cosmology.
  • At high angular frequencies, beyond the damping tail of the primary power spectrum, the dominant contribution to the power spectrum of cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuations is the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect. We investigate various important statistical properties of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich maps, using well-motivated models for dark matter clustering to construct statistical descriptions of the tSZ effect to all orders enabling us to determine the entire probability distribution function (PDF). Any generic deterministic biasing scheme can be incorporated in our analysis and the effects of projection, biasing and the underlying density distribution can be analysed separately and transparently in this approach. We introduce the cumulant correlators as tools to analyse tSZ catalogs and relate them to corresponding statistical descriptors of the underlying density distribution. The statistics of hot spots in frequency-cleaned tSZ maps are also developed in a self-consistent way to an arbitrary order, to obtain results complementary to those found using the halo model. We also consider different beam sizes, to check the extent to which the PDF can be extracted from various observational configurations. The formalism is presented with two specific models for underlying matter clustering: (1) the hierarchical ansatz; and (2) the lognormal distribution. We find both models to be in very good agreement with the simulation results, though the lognormal model has an edge over the hierarchical model.
  • Secondary contributions to the anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), such as the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect, the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect (tSZ), and the effect of gravitational lensing, have distinctive non-Gaussian signatures, and full descriptions therefore require information beyond that contained in their power spectra. In this paper we use the recently introduced skew-spectra associated with the Minkowski Functionals (MF) to probe the topology of CMB maps to probe the secondary non-Gaussianity as a function of beam-smoothing in order to separate various contributions. We devise estimators for these spectra in the presence of a realistic observational masks and present expressions for their covariance as a function of instrumental noise. Specific results are derived for the mixed ISW-lensing and tSZ-lensing bispectra as well as contamination due to point sources for noise levels that correspond to the Planck (143 GHz channel) and EPIC (150 GHz channel) experiments. The cumulative signal to noise ration $S/N$ for one-point generalized skewness-parameters can reach an order of ${\cal O}(10)$ for Planck and two orders of magnitude higher for EPIC, i.e. ${\cal O}(10^3)$. We also find that these three spectra skew-spectra are correlated, having correlation coefficients $r \sim 0.5-1.0$; higher $l$ modes are more strongly correlated. Though the values of $S/N$ increase with decreasing noise, the triplets of skew-spectra that determine the MFs bcome more correlated; the $S/N$ ratios of lensing-induced skew-spectra are smaller compared to that of a frequency-cleaned tSZ map.
  • The identification of strong gravitational lenses in large surveys has historically been a rather time consuming exercise. Early data from the Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey (Herschel-ATLAS) demonstrate that lenses can be identified efficiently at submillimetre wavelengths using a simple flux criteria. Motivated by that development, this work considers the statistical properties of strong gravitational lens systems which have been, and will be, found by the Herschel-ATLAS. Analytical models of lens statistics are tested with the current best estimates for the various model ingredients. These include the cosmological parameters, the mass function and the lens density profile, for which we consider the singular isothermal sphere (SIS) and the Navarro, Frenk & White (NFW) approximations. The five lenses identified in the Herschel-ATLAS Science Demonstration Phase suggest a SIS density profile is preferred, but cannot yet constrain \Omega_\Lambda to an accuracy comparable with other methods. The complete Herschel-ATLAS data set should be sufficient to yield competitive constraints on \Omega_\Lambda. Whilst this huge number of lenses has great potential for constraining cosmological parameters, they will be most powerful in constraining uncertainty in astrophysical processes. Further investigation is needed to fully exploit this unprecedented data set.
  • We study the effect of the non-Gaussianity induced by gravitational evolution upon the statistical properties of absorption in quasar (QSO) spectra. Using the generic hierarchical ansatz and the lognormal approximation we derive the analytical expressions for the one-point PDF as well as for the joint two-point probability distribution (2PDF) of transmitted fluxes in two neighbouring QSOs. These flux PDFs are constructed in 3D as well as in projection (i.e. in 2D). The PDFs are constructed by relating the lower-order moments, i.e. cumulants and cumulant correlators, of the fluxes to the 3D neutral hydrogen distribution which is, in turn, expressed as a function of the underlying dark matter distribution. The lower-order moments are next modelled using a generating function formalism in the context of a {\em minimal tree-model} for the higher-order correlation hierarchy. These different approximations give nearly identical results for the range of redshifts probed, and we also find a very good agreement between our predictions and outputs of hydrodynamical simulations. The formalism developed here for the joint statistics of flux-decrements concerning two lines of sight can be extended to multiple lines of sight, which could be particularly important for the 3D reconstruction of the cosmic web from QSO spectra (e.g. in the BOSS survey). These statistics probe the underlying projected neutral hydrogen field and are thus linked to "hot-spots" of absorption. The results for the PDF and the bias presented here use the same functional forms of scaling functions that have previously been employed for the modelling of other cosmological observation such as the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect.
  • Extending previous studies, we derive generic predictions for lower order cumulants and their correlators for individual tomographic bins as well as between two different bins. We derive the corresponding one- and two-point joint probability distribution function for the tomographic convergence maps from different bins as a function of angular smoothing scale. The modelling of weak lensing statistics is obtained by adopting a detailed prescription for the underlying density contrast. In this paper we concentrate on the convergence field $\kappa$ and use top-hat filter; though the techniques presented can readily be extended to model the PDF of shear components or to include other windows such as the compensated filter. The functional form for the underlying PDF and bias is modelled in terms of the non-linear or the quasilinear form depending on the smoothing angular scale. Results from other semi-analytical models e.g. the lognormal distribution are also presented. Introducing a reduced convergence for individual bins, we are able to show that the tomographic PDFs and bias for each bin sample the same functional form of the underlying PDF of density contrast but with varying variance. The joint probability distribution of the convergence maps that correspond to two different tomographic bins can be constructed from individual tomographic PDF and bias. We study their dependence on cosmological parameters for source distributions corresponding to the realistic surveys such as LSST and DES. We briefly outline how photometric redshift information can be incorporated in our computation of cumulants, cumulant correlators and the PDFs. Connection of our results to the full 3D calculations is elucidated. Analytical results for inclusion of realistic noise and finite survey size are presented in detail.
  • Motivated by observations that suggest the presence of extremely massive clusters at uncomfortably high redshifts for the standard cosmological model to explain, we develop a theoretical framework for the study of the most massive haloes, e.g. the most massive cluster found in a given volume, based on Extreme Value Statistics (EVS). We proceed from the exact distribution of the extreme values drawn from a known underlying distribution, rather than relying on asymptotic theory (which is independent of the underlying form), arguing that the former is much more likely to furnish robust statistical results. We illustrate this argument with a discussion of the use of extreme value statistics as a probe of primordial non-Gaussianity.
  • At high angular frequencies the thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (tSZ) effect constitutes the dominant signal in the CMB sky. The tSZ effect is caused by large scale pressure fluctuations in the baryonic distribution in the Universe so its statistical properties provide estimates of corresponding properties of the projected 3D pressure fluctuations. It's power spectrum is a sensitive probe of the density fluctuations, and the bispectrum can be used to separate the bias associated with pressure. The bispectrum is often probed with a one-point real-space analogue, the skewness. In addition to the skewness the morphological properties, as probed by the well known Minkowski Functionals (MFs), also require the generalized one-point statistics, which at the lowest order are identical to the skewness parameters. The concept of generalized skewness parameters can be extended to define a set of three associated generalized skew-spectra. We use these skew-spectra to probe the morphology of the tSZ sky or the y-sky. We show how these power spectra can be recovered from the data in the presence of arbitrary mask and noise templates using the well known Pseudo-Cl (PCL) approach for arbitrary beam shape. We also employ an approach based on the halo model to compute the tSZ bispectrum. The bispectrum from each of these models is then used to construct the generalized skew-spectra. We consider the performance of an all-sky survey with Planck-type noise and compare the results against a noise-free ideal experiment using a range of smoothing angles. We find that the skew-spectra can be estimated with very high signal-to-noise ratio from future frequency cleaned tSZ maps that will be available from experiments such as Planck. This will allow their mode by mode estimation for a wide range of angular frequencies and will help us to differentiate them from various other sources of non-Gaussianity.
  • We present a new harmonic-domain approach for extracting morphological information, in the form of Minkowski Functionals (MFs), from weak lensing (WL) convergence maps. Using a perturbative expansion of the MFs, which is expected to be valid for the range of angular scales probed by most current weak-lensing surveys, we show that the study of three generalized skewness parameters is equivalent to the study of the three MFs defined in two dimensions. We then extend these skewness parameters to three associated skew-spectra which carry more information about the convergence bispectrum than their one-point counterparts. We discuss various issues such as noise and incomplete sky coverage in the context of estimation of these skew-spectra from realistic data. Our technique provides an alternative to the pixel-space approaches typically used in the estimation of MFs, and it can be particularly useful in the presence of masks with non-trivial topology. Analytical modeling of weak lensing statistics relies on an accurate modeling of the statistics of underlying density distribution. We apply three different formalisms to model the underlying dark-matter bispectrum: the hierarchical ansatz, halo model and a fitting function based on numerical simulations; MFs resulting from each of these formalisms are computed and compared. We investigate the extent to witch late-time gravity-induced non-Gaussianity (to which weak lensing is primarily sensitive) can be separated from primordial non-Gaussianity and how this separation depends on source redshift and angular scale.
  • We consider the issue of characterizing the coherent large-scale patterns from CMB temperature maps in globally anisotropic cosmologies. The methods we investigate are reasonably general; the particular models we test them on are the homogeneous but anisotropic relativistic cosmologies described by the Bianchi classification. Although the temperature variations produced in these models are not stochastic, they give rise to a "non-Gaussian" distribution of temperature fluctuations over the sky that is a partial diagnostic of the model. We explore two methods for quantifying non-Gaussian and/or non-stationary fluctuation fields in order to see how they respond to the Bianchi models.We first investigate the behavior of phase correlations between the spherical harmonic modes of the maps. Then we examine the behavior of the multipole vectors of the temperature distribution which, though defined in harmonic space, can indicate the presence of a preferred direction in real space, i.e. on the 2-sphere. These methods give extremely clear signals of the presence of anisotropy when applied to the models we discuss, suggesting that they have some promise as diagnostics of the presence of global asymmetry in the Universe.
  • We discuss and compare two alternative models for the two-point angular correlation function of galaxies detected through the sub-millimetre emission using the Herschel Space Observatory. The first, now-standard Halo Model, which represents the angular correlations as arising from one-halo and two-halo contributions, is flexible but complex and rather unwieldy. The second model is based on a much simpler approach: we incorporate a fitting function method to estimate the matter correlation function with approximate model of the bias inferred from the estimated redshift distribution to find the galaxy angular correlation function. We find that both models give a good account of the shape of the correlation functions obtained from published preliminary studies of the HerMES and H-ATLAS surveys performed using Herschel, and yield consistent estimates of the minimum halo mass within which the sub-millimetre galaxies must reside. We note also that both models predict an inflection in the correlation function at intermediate angular scales, so the presence of the feature in the measured correlation function does not unambiguously indicate the presence of intra-halo correlations. The primary barrier to more detailed interpretation of these clustering measurements lies in the substantial uncertainty surrounding the redshift distribution of the sources.
  • We introduce a collection of statistics appropriate for the study of spinorial quantities defined in three dimensions, focussing on applications to cosmological weak gravitational lensing studies in 3D. In particular, we concentrate on power spectra associated with three- and four-point statistics, which have the advantage of compressing a large number of typically very noisy modes into a convenient data set. It has been shown previously by \cite{MuHe09} that, for non--Gaussianity studies in the microwave background, such compression can be lossless for certain purposes, so we expect the statistics we define here to capture the bulk of the cosmological information available in these higher-order statistics. We consider the effects of a sky mask and noise, and use Limber's approximation to show how, for high-frequency angular modes, confrontation of the statistics with theory can be achieved efficiently and accurately. We focus on scalar and spinorial fields including convergence, shear and flexion of 3D weak lensing, but many of the results apply for general spin fields.
  • Asantha Cooray, Steve Eales, Scott Chapman, David L. Clements, Olivier Dore, Duncan Farrah, Matt J. Jarvis, Manoj Kaplinghat, Mattia Negrello, Alessandro Melchiorri, Hiranya Peiris, Alexandra Pope, Mario G. Santos, Stephen Serjeant, Mark Thompson, Glenn White, Alexandre Amblard, Manda Banerji, Pier-Stefano Corasaniti, Sudeep Das, Francesco de_Bernardis, Gianfranco de_Zotti, Tommaso Giannantonio, Joaquin Gonzalez-Nuevo Gonzalez, Ali Ahmad Khostovan, Ketron Mitchell-Wynne, Paolo Serra, Yong-Seon Song, Joaquin Vieira, Lingyu Wang, Michael Zemcov, Filipe Abdalla, Jose Afonso, Nabila Aghanim, Paola Andreani, Itziar Aretxaga, Robbie Auld, Maarten Baes, Andrew Baker, Denis Barkats, R. Belen Barreiro, Nicola Bartolo, Elizabeth Barton, Sudhanshu Barway, Elia Stefano Battistelli, Carlton Baugh, Alexander Beelen, Karim Benabed, Andrew Blain, Joss Bland-Hawthorn, James J. Bock, J. Richard Bond, Julian Borrill, Colin Borys, Alessandro Boselli, Francois R. Bouchet, Carrie Bridge, Fabrizio Brighenti, Veronique Buat, David Buote, Denis Burgarella, Robert Bussmann, Erminia Calabrese, Christopher Cantalupo, Raymond Carlberg, Carla Sofia Carvalho, Caitlin Casey, Antonio Cava, Jordi Cepa, Edward Chapin, Ranga Ram Chary, Xuelei Chen, Sergio Colafrancesco, Shaun Cole, Peter Coles, Alexander Conley, Luca Conversi, Jeff Cooke, Steven Crawford, Catherine Cress, Elisabete da Cunha, Gavin Dalton, Luigi Danese, Helmut Dannerbauer, Jonathan Davies, Paolo de Bernardis, Roland de Putter, Mark Devlin, Jose M. Diego, Herve Dole, Marian Douspis, Joanna Dunkley, James Dunlop, Loretta Dunne, Rolando Dunner, Simon Dye, George Efstathiou, Eiichi Egami, Taotao Fang, Patrizia Ferrero, Alberto Franceschini, Christopher C. Frazer, David Frayer, Carlos Frenk, Ken Ganga, Raphael Gavazzi, Jason Glenn, Yan Gong, Eduardo Gonzalez-Solares, Matt Griffin, Qi Guo, Mark Gurwell, Amir Hajian, Mark Halpern, Duncan Hanson, Martin Hardcastle, Evanthia Hatziminaoglou, Alan Heavens, Sebastien Heinis, Diego Herranz, Matt Hilton, Shirley Ho, Benne W. Holwerda, Rosalind Hopwood, Jonathan Horner, Kevin Huffenberger, David H. Hughes, John P. Hughes, Edo Ibar, Rob Ivison, Neal Jackson, Andrew Jaffe, Timothy Jenness, Gilles Joncas, Shahab Joudaki, Sugata Kaviraj, Sam Kim, Lindsay King, Theodore Kisner, Johan Knapen, Alexei Kniazev, Eiichiro Komatsu, Leon Koopmans, Chao-Lin Kuo, Cedric Lacey, Ofer Lahav, Anthony N. Lasenby, Andy Lawrence, Myung Gyoon Lee, Lerothodi L. Leeuw, Louis R. Levenson, Geraint Lewis, Nicola Loaring, Marcos Lopez-Caniego, Steve Maddox, Tobias Marriage, Gaelen Marsden, Enrique Martinez-Gonzalez, Silvia Masi, Sabino Matarrese, William G. Mathews, Shuji Matsuura, Richard McMahon, Yannick Mellier, Felipe Menanteau, Michal J. Michalowski, Marius Millea, Bahram Mobasher, Subhanjoy Mohanty, Ludovic Montier, Kavilan Moodley, Gerald H. Moriarty-Schieven, Angela Mortier, Dipak Munshi, Eric Murphy, Kirpal Nandra, Paolo Natoli, Hien Nguyen, Seb Oliver, Alain Omont, Lyman Page, Mathew Page, Roberta Paladini, Stefania Pandolfi, Enzo Pascale, Guillaume Patanchon, John Peacock, Chris Pearson, Ismael Perez-Fournon, Pablo G. Perez-Gonz, Francesco Piacentini, Elena Pierpaoli, Michael Pohlen, Etienne Pointecouteau, Gianluca Polenta, Jason Rawlings, Erik D. Reese, Emma Rigby, Giulia Rodighiero, Encarni Romero-Colmenero, Isaac Roseboom, Michael Rowan-Robinson, Miguel Sanchez-Portal, Fabian Schmidt, Michael Schneider, Bernhard Schulz, Douglas Scott, Chris Sedgwick, Neelima Sehgal, Nick Seymour, Blake D. Sherwin, Jo Short, David Shupe, Jonathan Sievers, Ramin Skibba, Joseph Smidt, Anthony Smith, Daniel J. B. Smith, Matthew W. L. Smith, David Spergel, Suzanne Staggs, Jason Stevens, Eric Switzer, Toshinobu Takagi, Tsutomu Takeuchi, Pasquale Temi, Markos Trichas, Corrado Trigilio, Katherine Tugwell, Grazia Umana, William Vacca, Mattia Vaccari, Petri Vaisanen, Ivan Valtchanov, Kurt van der Heyden, Paul P. van der Werf, Eelco van_Kampen, Ludovic van_Waerbeke, Simona Vegetti, Marcella Veneziani, Licia Verde, Aprajita Verma, Patricio Vielva, Marco P. Viero, Baltasar Vila Vilaro, Julie Wardlow, Grant Wilson, Edward L. Wright, C. Kevin Xu, Min S. Yun
    July 22, 2010 astro-ph.CO
    A large sub-mm survey with Herschel will enable many exciting science opportunities, especially in an era of wide-field optical and radio surveys and high resolution cosmic microwave background experiments. The Herschel-SPIRE Legacy Survey (HSLS), will lead to imaging data over 4000 sq. degrees at 250, 350, and 500 micron. Major Goals of HSLS are: (a) produce a catalog of 2.5 to 3 million galaxies down to 26, 27 and 33 mJy (50% completeness; 5 sigma confusion noise) at 250, 350 and 500 micron, respectively, in the southern hemisphere (3000 sq. degrees) and in an equatorial strip (1000 sq. degrees), areas which have extensive multi-wavelength coverage and are easily accessible from ALMA. Two thirds of the of the sources are expected to be at z > 1, one third at z > 2 and about a 1000 at z > 5. (b) Remove point source confusion in secondary anisotropy studies with Planck and ground-based CMB data. (c) Find at least 1200 strongly lensed bright sub-mm sources leading to a 2% test of general relativity. (d) Identify 200 proto-cluster regions at z of 2 and perform an unbiased study of the environmental dependence of star formation. (e) Perform an unbiased survey for star formation and dust at high Galactic latitude and make a census of debris disks and dust around AGB stars and white dwarfs.
  • All-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations are usually represented by a spherical harmonic decomposition involving modes labelled by their degree l and order m (where -l < m < +l). The zonal modes (i.e those with m = 0) are of particular interest because they vary only with galactic latitude; any anomalous behaviour in them might therefore be an indication of erroneous foreground substraction. We perform a simple statistical analysis of the modes with low l for sky maps derived via different cleaning procedures from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and show that the zonal modes provide a useful diagnostic of possible systematics.
  • Owing to their more extensive sky coverage and tighter control on systematic errors, future deep weak lensing surveys should provide a better statistical picture of the dark matter clustering beyond the level of the power spectrum. In this context, the study of non-Gaussianity induced by gravity can help tighten constraints on the background cosmology by breaking parameter degeneracies, as well as throwing light on the nature of dark matter, dark energy or alternative gravity theories. Analysis of the shear or flexion properties of such maps is more complicated than the simpler case of the convergence due to the spinorial nature of the fields involved. Here we develop analytical tools for the study of higher-order statistics such as the bispectrum (or trispectrum) directly using such maps at different source redshift. The statistics we introduce can be constructed from cumulants of the shear or flexions, involving the cross-correlation of squared and cubic maps at different redshifts. Typically, the low signal-to-noise ratio prevents recovery of the bispectrum or trispectrum mode by mode. We define power spectra associated with each multi- spectra which compresses some of the available information of higher order multispectra. We show how these can be recovered from a noisy observational data even in the presence of arbitrary mask, which introduces mixing between Electric (E-type) and Magnetic (B-type) polarization, in an unbiased way. We also introduce higher order cross-correlators which can cross-correlate lensing shear with different tracers of large scale structures.
  • We explore a systematic approach to the analysis of primordial non-Gaussianity using fluctuations in temperature and polarization of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Following Munshi & Heavens (2009), we define a set of power-spectra as compressed forms of the bispectrum and trispectrum derived from CMB temperature and polarization maps; these spectra compress the information content of the corresponding full multispectra and can be useful in constraining early Universe theories. We generalize the standard pseudo-C_l estimators in such a way that they apply to these spectra involving both spin-0 and spin-2 fields, developing explicit expressions which can be used in the practical implementation of these estimators. While these estimators are suboptimal, they are nevertheless unbiased and robust hence can provide useful diagnostic tests at a relatively small computational cost. We next consider approximate inverse-covariance weighting of the data and construct a set of near-optimal estimators based on that approach. Instead of combining all available information from the entire set of mixed bi- or trispectra, i.e multispectra describing both temperature and polarization information, we provide analytical constructions for individual estimators, associated with particular multispectra. The bias and scatter of these estimators can be computed using Monte-Carlo techniques. Finally, we provide estimators which are completely optimal for arbitrary scan strategies and involve inverse covariance weighting; we present the results of an error analysis performed using a Fisher-matrix formalism at both the one-point and two-point level.
  • Weak gravitational lensing on a cosmological scales can provide strong constraints both on the nature of dark matter and the dark energy equation of state. Most current weak lensing studies are restricted to (two-dimensional) projections, but tomographic studies with photometric redshifts have started, and future surveys offer the possibility of probing the evolution of structure with redshift. In future we will be able to probe the growth of structure in 3D and put tighter constraints on cosmological models than can be achieved by the use of galaxy redshift surveys alone. Earlier studies in this direction focused mainly on evolution of the 3D power spectrum, but extension to higher-order statistics can lift degeneracies as well as providing information on primordial non-gaussianity. We present analytical results for specific higher-order descriptors, the bispectrum and trispectrum, as well as collapsed multi-point statistics derived from them, i.e. cumulant correlators. We also compute quantities we call the power spectra associated with the bispectrum and trispectrum, the Fourier transforms of the well-known cumulant correlators. We compute the redshift dependence of these objects and study their performance in the presence of realistic noise and photometric redshift errors.
  • Cosmic microwave background studies of non-Gaussianity involving higher-order multispectra can distinguish between early universe theories that predict nearly identical power spectra. However, the recovery of higher-order multispectra is difficult from realistic data due to their complex response to inhomogeneous noise and partial sky coverage, which are often difficult to model analytically. A traditional alternative is to use one-point cumulants of various orders, which collapse the information present in a multispectrum to one number. The disadvantage of such a radical compression of the data is a loss of information as to the source of the statistical behaviour. A recent study by Munshi & Heavens (2009) has shown how to define the skew spectrum (the power spectra of a certain cubic field, related to the bispectrum) in an optimal way and how to estimate it from realistic data. The skew spectrum retains some of the information from the full configuration-dependence of the bispectrum, and can contain all the information on non-Gaussianity. In the present study, we extend the results of the skew spectrum to the case of two degenerate power-spectra related to the trispectrum. We also explore the relationship of these power-spectra and cumulant correlators previously used to study non-Gaussianity in projected galaxy surveys or weak lensing surveys. We construct nearly optimal estimators for quick tests and generalise them to estimators which can handle realistic data with all their complexity in a completely optimal manner. We show how these higher-order statistics and the related power spectra are related to the Taylor expansion coefficients of the potential in inflation models, and demonstrate how the trispectrum can constrain both the quadratic and cubic terms.
  • We calculate the temperature and polarization patterns generated in anisotropic cosmological models drawn from the Bianchi classification. We show that localized features in the temperature pattern, perhaps similar to the cold spot observed in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data, can be generated in models with negative spatial curvature, i.e. Bianchi types V and VII$_{h}$. Both these models also generate coherent polarization patterns. In Bianchi VII$_h$, however, rotation of the polarization angle as light propagates along geodesics can convert E modes into B modes but in Bianchi V this is not necessarily the case. It is in principle possible, therefore, to generate localized temperature features without violating existing observational constraints on the odd-parity component of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background.