• We present detailed ultraviolet, optical and near-infrared light curves of the Type Ia supernova (SN) 2012fr, which exploded in the Fornax cluster member NGC 1365. These precise high-cadence light curves provide a dense coverage of the flux evolution from $-$12 to $+$140 days with respect to the epoch of $B$-band maximum (\tmax). Supplementary imaging at the earliest epochs reveals an initial slow, nearly linear rise in luminosity with a duration of $\sim$2.5 days, followed by a faster rising phase that is well reproduced by an explosion model with a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni mixing in the ejecta. From an analysis of the light curves, we conclude: $(i)$ explosion occurred $< 22$ hours before the first detection of the supernova, $(ii)$ the rise time to peak bolometric ($\lambda > 1800 $\AA) luminosity was $16.5 \pm 0.6$ days, $(iii)$ the supernova suffered little or no host-galaxy dust reddening, $(iv)$ the peak luminosity in both the optical and near-infrared was consistent with the bright end of normal Type Ia diversity, and $(v)$ $0.60 \pm 0.15 M_{\odot}$ of $^{56}$Ni was synthesized in the explosion. Despite its normal luminosity, SN 2012fr displayed unusually prevalent high-velocity \ion{Ca}{2} and \ion{Si}{2} absorption features, and a nearly constant photospheric velocity of the \ion{Si}{2} $\lambda$6355 line at $\sim$12,000 \kms\ beginning $\sim$5 days before \tmax. Other peculiarities in the early phase photometry and the spectral evolution are highlighted. SN 2012fr also adds to a growing number of Type Ia supernovae hosted by galaxies with direct Cepheid distance measurements.
  • Hawking's singularity theorem concerns matter obeying the strong energy condition (SEC), which means that all observers experience a nonnegative effective energy density (EED), thereby guaranteeing the timelike convergence property. However, there are models that do not satisfy the SEC and therefore lie outside the scope of Hawking's hypotheses, an important example being the massive Klein-Gordon field. Here we derive lower bounds on local averages of the EED for solutions to the Klein-Gordon equation, allowing nonzero mass and nonminimal coupling to the scalar curvature. The averages are taken along timelike geodesics or over spacetime volumes, and our bounds are valid for a range of coupling constants including both minimal and conformal coupling. Using methods developed by Fewster and Galloway, these lower bounds are applied to prove a Hawking-type singularity theorem for solutions to the Einstein-Klein-Gordon theory, asserting that solutions with sufficient initial contraction at a compact Cauchy surface will be future timelike geodesically incomplete.
  • We present results of the photometric (from 3 to 509 days past explosion) and spectroscopic (up to 230 days past explosion) monitoring campaign of the He-rich Type IIb supernova (SN) 2015as. The {\it (B-V)} colour evolution of SN 2015as closely resemble those of SN 2008ax, suggesting that SN 2015as belongs to the SN IIb subgroup that does not show the early, short-duration photometric peak. The light curve of SN 2015as reaches the $B$-band maximum about 22 days after the explosion, at an absolute magnitude of -16.82 $\pm$ 0.18 mag. At $\sim$ 75 days after the explosion, its spectrum transitions from that of a SN II to a SN Ib. P~Cygni features due to He I lines appear at around 30 days after explosion, indicating that the progenitor of SN 2015as was partially stripped. For SN~2015as, we estimate a $^{56}$Ni mass of $\sim$ 0.08 M$_{\odot}$ and ejecta mass of 1.1--2.2 M$_{\odot}$, which are similar to the values inferred for SN 2008ax. The quasi bolometric analytical light curve modelling suggests that the progenitor of SN 2015as has a modest mass ($\sim$ 0.1 M$_{\odot}$), a nearly-compact ($\sim$ 0.05$\times$10$^{13}$ cm) H envelope on top of a dense, compact ($\sim$ 2$\times$10$^{11}$ cm) and a more massive ($\sim$ 1.2 M$_{\odot}$) He core. The analysis of the nebular phase spectra indicates that $\sim$ 0.44 M$_{\odot}$ of O is ejected in the explosion. The intensity ratio of the [Ca II]/[O I] nebular lines favours either a main sequence progenitor mass of $\sim$ 15 M$_{\odot}$ or a Wolf Rayet star of 20 M$_{\odot}$.
  • Optical polarimetry is an effective way of probing the environment of supernova for dust. We acquired linear HST ACS/WFC polarimetry in bands $F475W$, $F606W$, and $F775W$ of the supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 at six epochs from $\sim$277 days to $\sim$1181 days after the $B$-band maximum. The polarization measured at day 277 shows conspicuous deviations from other epochs. These differences can be attributed to at least $\sim$ 10$^{-6} M_{\odot}$ of circumstellar dust located at a distance of $\sim5\times10^{17}$ cm from the SN. The scattering dust grains revealed by these observations seem to be aligned with the dust in the interstellar medium that is responsible for the large reddening towards the supernova. The presence of this circumstellar dust sets strong constraints on the progenitor system that led to the explosion of SN\,2014J; however, it cannot discriminate between single- and double-degenerate models.
  • Hydrogen-poor superluminous supernovae (SLSNe-I) have been predominantly found in low-metallicity, star-forming dwarf galaxies. Here we identify Gaia17biu/SN 2017egm as an SLSN-I occurring in a "normal" spiral galaxy (NGC 3191) in terms of stellar mass (several times 10^10 M_sun) and metallicity (roughly Solar). At redshift z=0.031, Gaia17biu is also the lowest redshift SLSN-I to date, and the absence of a larger population of SLSNe-I in dwarf galaxies of similar redshift suggests that metallicity is likely less important to the production of SLSNe-I than previously believed. With the smallest distance and highest apparent brightness for an SLSN-I, we are able to study Gaia17biu in unprecedented detail. Its pre-peak near-ultraviolet to optical color is similar to that of Gaia16apd and among the bluest observed for an SLSN-I while its peak luminosity (M_g = -21 mag) is substantially lower than Gaia16apd. Thanks to the high signal-to-noise ratios of our spectra, we identify several new spectroscopic features that may help to probe the properties of these enigmatic explosions. We detect polarization at the ~0.5% level that is not strongly dependent on wavelength, suggesting a modest, global departure from spherical symmetry. In addition, we put the tightest upper limit yet on the radio luminosity of an SLSN-I with <5.4x10^26 erg/s/Hz (at 10 GHz), which is almost a factor of 40 better than previous upper limits and one of the few measured at an early stage in the evolution of an SLSN-I. This limit largely rules out an association of this SLSNe-I with known populations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) like central engines.
  • The very nearby Type Ia supernova 2014J in M82 offers a rare opportunity to study the physics of thermonuclear supernovae at extremely late phases ($\gtrsim$800 days). Using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we obtained six epochs of high precision photometry for SN 2014J from 277 days to 1181 days past the $B-$band maximum light. The reprocessing of electrons and X-rays emitted by the radioactive decay chain $^{57}$Co$\rightarrow ^{57}$Fe are needed to explain the significant flattening of both the $F606W$-band and the pseudo-bolometric light curves. The flattening confirms previous predictions that the late-time evolution of type Ia supernova luminosities requires additional energy input from the decay of $^{57}$Co (Seitenzahl et al. 2009). By assuming the $F606W$-band luminosity scales with the bolometric luminosity at $\sim$500 days after the $B-$band maximum light, a mass ratio $^{57}$Ni/$^{56}$Ni$\sim$0.065$_{-0.004}^{+0.005}$ is required. This mass ratio is roughly $\sim$3 times the solar ratio and favors a progenitor white dwarf with a mass near the Chandrasekhar limit. A similar fit using the constructed pseudo-bolometric luminosity gives a mass ratio $^{57}$Ni/$^{56}$Ni$\sim$0.066$_{-0.008}^{+0.009}$. Astrometric tests based on the multi-epoch HST ACS/WFC images reveal no significant circumstellar light echoes in between 0.3 pc and 100 pc (Yang et al. 2017) from the supernova.
  • We present the results of an extensive observational campaign on the nearby Type Ibn SN 2015G, including data from radio through ultraviolet wavelengths. SN 2015G was asymmetric, showing late-time nebular lines redshifted by ~1000 km/s. It shared many features with the prototypical SN In 2006jc, including extremely strong He I emssion lines and a late-time blue pseudocontinuum. The young SN 2015G showed narrow P-Cygni profiles of He I, but never in its evolution did it show any signature of hydrogen - arguing for a dense, ionized, and hydrogen-free circumstellar medium moving outward with a velocity of ~1000 km/s and created by relatively recent mass loss from the progenitor star. Ultraviolet through infrared observations show that the fading SN 2015G (which was probably discovered some 20 days post-peak) had a spectral energy distribution that was well described by a simple, single-component blackbody. Archival HST images provide upper limits on the luminosity of SN 2015G's progenitor, while nondetections of any luminous radio afterglow and optical nondetections of outbursts over the past two decades provide constraints upon its mass-loss history.
  • Understanding the intrinsic colors of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is important to their use as cosmological standard candles. Understanding the effects of reddening and redshift on the observed colors are complicated and dependent on the intrinsic spectrum, the filter curves, and the wavelength dependence of reddening. We present ultraviolet and optical data of a growing sample of SNe Ia observed with the Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope on the Swift spacecraft and use this sample to re-examine the near-UV (NUV) colors of SNe Ia. We find that a small amount of reddening (E(B-V)=0.2 mag) could account for the difference between groups designated as NUV-blue and NUV-red, and a moderate amount of reddening (E(B-V)=0.5 mag) could account for the whole NUV-optical differences. The reddening scenario, however, is inconsistent with the mid-UV colors and color evolution. The effect of redshift alone only accounts for part of the variation. Using a spectral template of SN2011fe we can forward model the effects of redshift and reddening and directly compare with the observed colors. We find that some SNe are consistent with reddened versions of SN2011fe, but most SNe Ia are much redder in the uvw1-v color than SN2011fe reddened to the same b-v color. The absolute magnitudes show that two of five NUV-blue SNe Ia are blue because their near-UV luminosity is high, and the other three are optically fainter. We also show that SN2011fe is not a "normal" SN Ia in the UV, but has colors placing it at the blue extreme of our sample.
  • The summit of the Antarctic plateau, Dome A, is proving to be an excellent site for optical, NIR, and THz astronomical observations. GATTINI was a wide-field camera installed on the PLATO instrument module as part of the Chinese-led traverse to Dome A in January, 2009. We present here the measurements of sky brightness with the Gattini ultra-large field of view (90 deg x 90 deg) in the photometric B-, V-, and R-bands, cloud cover statistics measured during the 2009 winter season, and an estimate of the sky transparency. A cumulative probability distribution indicates that the darkest 10% of the nights at Dome A have sky brightness of S_B = 22.98, S_V = 21.86, and S_R = 21.68 mag arcsec^{-2}. These values were obtained around the year 2009 with minimum aurora, and they are comparable to the faintest sky brightness at Mauna Kea and the best sites of northern Chile. Since every filter includes strong auroral lines that effectively contaminate the sky brightness measurements, for instruments working around the auroral lines, either with custom filters or with high spectral resolution instruments, these values could be easily obtained on a more routine basis. In addition, we present example light curves for bright targets to emphasize the unprecedented observational window function available from this ground-based site. These light curves will be published in a future paper.
  • SN 2016gkg is a nearby Type IIb supernova discovered shortly after explosion. Like several other Type IIb events with early-time data, SN 2016gkg displays a double-peaked light curve, with the first peak associated with the cooling of a low-mass extended progenitor envelope. We present unprecedented intranight-cadence multi-band photometric coverage of the first light-curve peak of SN 2016gkg obtained from the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope network, the Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System, the Swift satellite and various amateur-operated telescopes. Fitting these data to analytical shock-cooling models gives a progenitor radius of ~25-140 solar radii with ~2-30 x 10^-2 solar masses of material in the extended envelope (depending on the model and the assumed host-galaxy extinction). Our radius estimates are broadly consistent with values derived independently (in other works) from HST imaging of the progenitor star. However, the shock-cooling model radii are on the lower end of the values indicated by pre-explosion imaging. Hydrodynamical simulations could refine the progenitor parameters deduced from the shock-cooling emission and test the analytical models.
  • We present multiple-epoch measurements of the size and surface brightness of the light echoes from supernova (SN) 2014J in the nearby starburst galaxy M82. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) ACS/WFC images were taken ~277 and ~416 days after B-band maximum in the filters F475W, F606W, and F775W. Observations with HST WFC3/UVIS images at epochs ~216 and ~365 days (Crotts 2015) are included for a more complete analysis. The images reveal the temporal evolution of at least two major light-echo components. The first one exhibits a filled ring structure with position-angle-dependent intensity. This radially extended, diffuse echo indicates the presence of an inhomogeneous interstellar dust cloud ranging from ~100 pc to ~500 pc in the foreground of the SN. The second echo component appears as an unresolved luminous quarter-circle arc centered on the SN. The wavelength dependence of scattering measured in different dust components suggests that the dust producing the luminous arc favors smaller grain sizes, while that causing the diffuse light echo may have sizes similar to those of the Milky Way dust. Smaller grains can produce an optical depth consistent with that along the supernova-Earth line of sight measured by previous studies around maximum light. Therefore, it is possible that the dust slab, from which the luminous arc arises, is also responsible for most of the extinction towards SN 2014J. The optical depths determined from the Milky Way-like dust in the scattering matters are lower than that produced by the dust slab.
  • We present optical spectroscopy, ultraviolet to infrared imaging and X-ray observations of the intermediate luminosity optical transient (ILOT) SN 2010da in NGC 300 (d=1.86 Mpc) spanning from -6 to +6 years relative to the time of outburst in 2010. Based on the light curve and multi-epoch SEDs of SN 2010da, we conclude that the progenitor of SN 2010da is a ~10-12 Msol yellow supergiant possibly transitioning into a blue loop phase. During outburst, SN 2010da had a peak absolute magnitude of M<-10.4 mag, dimmer than other ILOTs and supernova impostors. We detect multi-component hydrogen Balmer, Paschen, and Ca II emission lines in our high-resolution spectra, which indicate a dusty and complex circumstellar environment. Since the 2010 eruption, the star has brightened by a factor of ~5 and remains highly variable in the optical. Furthermore, we detect SN 2010da in archival Swift and Chandra observations as an ultraluminous X-ray source (L~6x10^{39} erg/s). We additionally attribute He II 4686 Angstrom and coronal Fe emission lines in addition to a steady X-ray luminosity of ~10^{37} erg/s to the presence of a compact companion.
  • Extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations are presented for SN 2014cx, a type IIP supernova (SN) exploding in the nearby galaxy NGC 337. The observations are performed in optical and ultraviolet bands, covering from -20 to +400 days from the peak light. The stringent detection limit from prediscovery images suggests that this supernova was actually detected within about 1 day after explosion. Evolution of the very early-time light curve of SN 2014cx is similar to that predicted from a shock breakout and post-shock cooling decline before reaching the optical peak. Our photometric observations show that SN 2014cx has a plateau duration of ~ 100 days, an absolute V-band magnitude of ~ -16.5 mag at t~50 days, and a nickel mass of 0.056+-0.008 Msun. The spectral evolution of SN 2014cx resembles that of normal SNe IIP like SN 1999em and SN 2004et, except that it has a slightly higher expansion velocity (~ 4200 km/s at 50 days). From the cooling curve of photospheric temperature, we derive that the progenitor has a pre-explosion radius of ~ 640 Rsun, consistent with those obtained from SNEC modeling (~ 620 Rsun) and hydrodynamical modeling of the observables (~ 570 Rsun). Moreover, the hydrodynamical simulations yield a total explosion energy of ~ 0.4*10e51 erg, and an ejected mass of ~ 8 Msun. These results indicate that the immediate progenitor of SN 2014cx is likely a red supergiant star with a mass of ~ 10 Msun.
  • We present and discuss ultraviolet and optical photometry from the Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope and X-ray limits from the X-Ray Telescope on Swift and imaging polarimetry and ultraviolet/optical spectroscopy with the Hubble Space Telescope of ASASSN-15lh. It has been classified as a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN I) more luminous than any other supernova observed. ASASSN-15lh is not detected in the X-rays in individual or coadded observations. From the polarimetry we determine that the explosion was only mildly asymmetric. We find the flux of ASASSN-15lh to increase strongly into the ultraviolet, with a ultraviolet luminosity a hundred times greater than the hydrogen-rich, ultraviolet-bright SLSN II SN 2008es. We find objects as bright as ASASSN-15lh are easily detectable beyond redshifts of ~4 with the single-visit depths planned for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Deep near-infrared surveys could detect such objects past a redshift of ~20 enabling a probe of the earliest star formation. A late rebrightening -- most prominent at shorter wavelengths -- is seen about two months after the peak brightness, which is itself as bright as a superluminous supernova. The ultraviolet spectra during the rebrightening are dominated by the continuum without the broad absorption or emission lines seen in SLSNe or tidal disruption events and the early optical spectra of ASASSN-15lh. Our spectra show no strong hydrogen emission, showing only LyA absorption near the redshift previously found by optical absorption lines of the presumed host. The properties of ASASSN-15lh are extreme when compared to either SLSNe or tidal disruption events.
  • We discuss the transformation of observed photometry into flux for the creation of spectral energy distributions and the computation of bolometric luminosities. We do this in the context of supernova studies, particularly as observed with the Swift spacecraft, but the concepts and techniques should be applicable to many other types of sources and wavelength regimes. Traditional methods of converting observed magnitudes to flux densities are not very accurate when applied to UV photometry. Common methods for extinction and the integration of pseudo-bolometric fluxes can also lead to inaccurate results. The sources of inaccuracy, though, also apply to other wavelengths. Because of the complicated nature of translating broad-band photometry into monochromatic flux densities, comparison between observed photometry and a spectroscopic model is best done by comparing in the natural units of the observations. We recommend that integrated flux measurements be made using a spectrum or spectral energy distribution which is consistent with the multi-band photometry rather than converting individual photometric measurements to flux densities, linearly interpolating between the points, and integrating. We also highlight some specific areas where the UV flux can be mischaracterized.
  • We use the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) to reduce the uncertainty in the local value of the Hubble constant (H_0) from 3.3% to 2.4%. Improvements come from new, near-infrared observations of Cepheid variables in 11 new hosts of recent SNe~Ia, more than doubling the sample of SNe~Ia having a Cepheid-calibrated distance for a total of 19; these leverage the magnitude-z relation based on 300 SNe~Ia at z<0.15. All 19 hosts and the megamaser system NGC4258 were observed with WFC3, thus nullifying cross-instrument zeropoint errors. Other improvements include a 33% reduction in the systematic uncertainty in the maser distance to NGC4258, more Cepheids and a more robust distance to the LMC from late-type DEBs, HST observations of Cepheids in M31, and new HST-based trigonometric parallaxes for Milky Way (MW) Cepheids. We consider four geometric distance calibrations of Cepheids: (i) megamasers in NGC4258, (ii) 8 DEBs in the LMC, (iii) 15 MW Cepheids with parallaxes, and (iv) 2 DEBs in M31. H_0 from each is 72.25+/-2.51, 72.04+/-2.67, 76.18+/-2.37, and 74.50+/-3.27 km/sec/Mpc, respectively. Our best estimate of 73.24+/-1.74 km/sec/Mpc combines the anchors NGC4258, MW, and LMC, and includes systematic errors for a final uncertainty of 2.4%. This value is 3.4 sigma higher than 66.93+/-0.62 km/sec/Mpc predicted by LambdaCDM with 3 neutrinos with mass 0.06 eV and the Planck data, but reduces to 2.1 sigma relative to the prediction of 69.3+/-0.7 km/sec/Mpc with the combination of WMAP+ACT+SPT+BAO, suggesting systematic uncertainties in CMB measurements may play a role in the tension. If we take the conflict between Planck and H_0 at face value, one plausible explanation could involve an additional source of dark radiation in the early Universe in the range of Delta N_eff=0.4-1. We anticipate significant improvements in H_0 from upcoming parallax measurements.
  • We report evidence for excess blue light from the Type Ia supernova SN 2012cg at fifteen and sixteen days before maximum B-band brightness. The emission is consistent with predictions for the impact of the supernova on a non-degenerate binary companion. This is the first evidence for emission from a companion to a SN Ia. Sixteen days before maximum light, the B-V color of SN 2012cg is 0.2 mag bluer than for other normal SN~Ia. At later times, this supernova has a typical SN Ia light curve, with extinction-corrected M_B = -19.62 +/- 0.02 mag and Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.86 +/- 0.02. Our data set is extensive, with photometry in 7 filters from 5 independent sources. Early spectra also show the effects of blue light, and high-velocity features are observed at early times. Near maximum, the spectra are normal with a silicon velocity v_{Si} = -10,500$ km s^{-1}. Comparing the early data with models by Kasen (2010) favors a main-sequence companion of about 6 solar masses. It is possible that many other SN Ia have main-sequence companions that have eluded detection because the emission from the impact is fleeting and faint.
  • We present a new technique of decontaminating Swift UVOT grism spectra for transient objects. We describe the template image requirements and image processing steps necessary to successfully implement the empirical decontamination technique. We demonstrate the accuracy of the flux and wavelength calibrations for decontaminated spectra by comparing a spectrum of SN 2011fe with a well-calibrated, long-slit ultraviolet spectrum from the Hubble Space Telescope's Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. We also show how the decontamination removes spurious emission lines from spectra of iPTF14bdn which otherwise could be misinterpreted as coming from the supernova. The software which implements this technique is briefly discussed and is made available to the community.
  • We present ultraviolet (UV) and optical photometry and spectra of the 1999aa-like supernova (SN) iPTF14bdn. The UV data were observed using the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) and constitute the first UV spectral series of a 1999aa-like SN. From the photometry we measure $\Delta m_{15}({\it B})\,=\,0.84 \pm0.05$ mag and blue UV colors at epochs earlier than $-5$ days. The spectra show that the early-time blue colors are the result of less absorption between $2800 - 3200 \,\AA~$ than is present in normal SNe Ia. Using model spectra fits of the data at $-10 $ and $+10 $ days, we identify the origin of this spectral feature to be a temperature effect in which doubly ionized iron group elements create an opacity 'window'. We determine that the detection of high temperatures and large quantities of iron group elements at early epochs imply the mixing of a high Ni mass into the outer layers of the SN ejecta. We also identify the source of the I-band secondary maximum in iPTF14bdn to be the decay of Fe III to Fe II, as is seen in normal SNe Ia.
  • Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae in its first ten years. Photometry from the Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT) is being compiled in the Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernovae Archive (SOUSA). The diversity of supernovae leads to a wide dynamic range of intrinsic properties. The intrinsic UV brightness of supernovae as a function of type and epoch allows one to understand the distance ranges at which Swift can reliably detect supernovae. The large Swift sample also includes supernovae from the same galaxy as other Swift supernovae. Through the first ten years, these families include 34 supernovae from 16 host galaxies (two galaxies have each hosted three Swift supernovae).
  • The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Explorer has proven to be an incredible platform for studying the multiwavelength properties of supernova explosions. In its first ten years, Swift has observed over three hundred supernovae. The ultraviolet observations reveal a complex diversity of behavior across supernova types and classes. Even amongst the standard candle type Ia supernovae, ultraviolet observations reveal distinct groups. When the UVOT data is combined with higher redshift optical data, the relative populations of these groups appear to change with redshift. Among core-collapse supernovae, Swift discovered the shock breakout of two supernovae and the Swift data show a diversity in the cooling phase of the shock breakout of supernovae discovered from the ground and promptly followed up with Swift. Swift observations have resulted in an incredible dataset of UV and X-ray data for comparison with high-redshift supernova observations and theoretical models. Swift's supernova program has the potential to dramatically improve our understanding of stellar life and death as well as the history of our universe.
  • We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of supernova 2013ej. It is one of the brightest type II supernovae exploded in a nearby ($\sim 10$ Mpc) galaxy NGC 628. The light curve characteristics are similar to type II SNe, but with a relatively shorter ($ \sim85 $ day) and steeper ($ \sim1.7 $ mag (100 d)$^{-1} $ in V) plateau phase. The SN shows a large drop of 2.4 mag in V band brightness during plateau to nebular transition. The absolute ultraviolet (UV) light curves are identical to SN 2012aw, showing a similar UV plateau trend extending up to 85 days. The radioactive $^{56}$Ni mass estimated from the tail luminosity is $ 0.02 $M$_{\odot}$ which is significantly lower than typical type IIP SNe. The characteristics of spectral features and evolution of line velocities indicate that SN 2013ej is a type II event. However, light curve characteristics and some spectroscopic features provide strong support in classifying it as a type IIL event. A detailed SYNOW modelling of spectra indicates the presence of some high velocity components in H$\alpha$ and H$\beta$ profiles, implying possible ejecta-CSM interaction. The nebular phase spectrum shows an unusual notch in the H$\alpha$ emission which may indicate bipolar distribution of $^{56}$Ni. Modelling of the bolometric light curve yields a progenitor mass of $ \sim14 $M$_{\odot}$ and a radius of $ \sim450 $R$_{\odot}$, with a total explosion energy of $ \sim2.3\times10^{51} $ erg.
  • The effect of metallicity on the observed light of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) could lead to systematic errors as the absolute magnitudes of local and distant SNe Ia are compared to measure luminosity distances and determine cosmological parameters. The UV light may be especially sensitive to metallicity, though different modeling methods disagree as to the magnitude, wavelength dependence, and even the sign of the effect. The outer density structure, ^56 Ni, and to a lesser degree asphericity, also impact the UV. We compute synthetic photometry of various metallicity-dependent models and compare to UV/optical photometry from the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope. We find that the scatter in the mid-UV to near-UV colors is larger than predicted by changes in metallicity alone and is not consistent with reddening. We demonstrate that a recently employed method to determine relative abundances using UV spectra can be done using UVOT photometry, but we warn that accurate results require an accurate model of the cause of the variations. The abundance of UV photometry now available should provide constraints on models that typically rely on UV spectroscopy for constraining metallicity, density, and other parameters. Nevertheless, UV spectroscopy for a variety of SN explosions is still needed to guide the creation of accurate models. A better understanding of the influences affecting the UV is important for using SNe Ia as cosmological probes, as the UV light may test whether SNe Ia are significantly affected by evolutionary effects.
  • We present extensive ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of the type IIP supernova (SN IIP) 2013ej in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The multicolor light curves, spanning from $\sim$ 8--185 days after explosion, show that it has a higher peak luminosity (i.e., M$_{V}$ $\sim$$-$17.83 mag at maximum light), a faster post-peak decline, and a shorter plateau phase (i.e., $\sim$ 50 days) compared to the normal type IIP SN 1999em. The mass of $^{56}$Ni is estimated as 0.02$\pm$0.01 M$_{\odot}$ from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve. The spectral evolution of SN 2013ej is similar to that of SN 2004et and SN 2007od, but shows a larger expansion velocity (i.e., $v_{Fe II} \sim$ 4600 km s$^{-1}$ at t $\sim$ 50 days) and broader line profiles. In the nebular phase, the emission of H$\alpha$ line displays a double-peak structure, perhaps due to the asymmetric distribution of $^{56}$Ni produced in the explosion. With the constraints from the main observables such as bolometric light curve, expansion velocity and photospheric temperature of SN 2013ej, we performed hydrodynamical simulations of the explosion parameters, yielding the total explosion energy as $\sim$0.7$\times$ 10$^{51}$ erg, the radius of the progenitor as $\sim$600 R$_{\odot}$, and the ejected mass as $\sim$10.6 M$_{\odot}$. These results suggest that SN 2013ej likely arose from a red supergiant with a mass of 12--13 M$_{\odot}$ immediately before the explosion.
  • We present photometric and spectroscopic observations of SN Hunt 248, a new supernova (SN) impostor in NGC 5806, which began a multi-stage outburst in 2014 May. The initial '2014a' discovery brightening exhibited an absolute magnitude of M~-12 and the spectral characteristics of a cool dense outflow, including P-Cygni lines of Fe II, H I, Na I, and strong line blanketing from metals. The source rapidly climbed and peaked near M~-15 mag after two additional weeks. During this bright '2014b' phase the spectrum became dominated by Balmer emission and a stronger blue continuum, similar to the SN impostor SN 1997bs. Archival images from the Hubble Space Telescope between 1997 and 2005 reveal a luminous (4e5 Lsun) variable precursor star. Its location on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is consistent with a massive (M_init~30 Msun) cool hypergiant having an extremely dense wind and an Eddington ratio just below unity. At the onset of the recent 2014a brightening, however, the object became super-Eddington. The subsequent boost in luminosity during the 2014b phase probably resulted from circumstellar interaction. SN Hunt 248 provides the first case of a cool hypergiant undergoing a giant eruption reminiscent of outbursts from luminous blue variable (LBV) stars. This lends support to the hypothesis that some cool hypergiants, such as Rho Cas, could be LBVs masquerading under a pseudo-photosphere created by their extremely dense winds. Moreover, SN Hunt 248 demonstrates that eruptions stemming from such stars can rival in peak luminosity the giant outbursts of much more massive systems like Eta Car.