• High temperature superconductivity (HTS) in Cu-based materials is generated by strong electronic correlations due to proximity of the Mott insulator phase. By contrast, the undoped phase proximate to Fe-based HTS is never an insulator. But this striking distinction may be deceptive because, while only a single Cu d-orbital is active in the former compounds, up to five Fe d-orbitals are active in the latter. In theory, such orbital multiplicity allows an unusual new state, referred to as an orbital-selective Hund's metal, to appear. In this state, strong Hund's coupling aligns the Fe spins thereby suppressing the inter-orbital charge fluctuations. The result is orbital selectivity of correlations wherein electrons associated with some orbitals become strongly incoherent but coexist with coherent quasiparticles associated with other orbitals of the same atom. A distinguishing experimental signature would be that quasiparticle spectral weights $Z_m$ associated with each different orbital m would be highly distinct, effectively resulting in orbital selectivity of quasiparticles. To search for such effects associated with Fe-based HTS, we visualize quasiparticle interference resolved by orbital content in FeSe, and discover strong orbitally selective differences of quasiparticle $Z_m$ on all detectable bands. Measurement of QPI amplitudes on the \alpha-, \epsilon- and \delta-bands of FeSe reveals that $Z_{xy}<Z_{xz}<<Z_{yz}$ for a wide energy range and throughout k-space. Moreover, the magnitudes and ratios of these quasiparticle weights are consistent with those deduced independently from the properties of orbital-selective Cooper pairing. All these data indicate that orbital-selective strong correlations dominate the Hund's metal state underpinning superconductivity in FeSe, a situation that would be of broad fundamental significance if true for Fe-based superconductors in general.
  • The superconductor FeSe is of intense interest thanks to its unusual non-magnetic nematic state and potential for high temperature superconductivity. But its Cooper pairing mechanism has not been determined. Here we use Bogoliubov quasiparticle interference imaging to determine the Fermi surface geometry of the bands surrounding the $\Gamma = (0,0)$ and $X=(\pi / a_{Fe}, 0)$ points of FeSe, and to measure the corresponding superconducting energy gaps. We show that both gaps are extremely anisotropic but nodeless, and exhibit gap maxima oriented orthogonally in momentum space. Moreover, by implementing a novel technique we demonstrate that these gaps have opposite sign with respect to each other. This complex gap configuration reveals the existence of orbital-selective Cooper pairing which, in FeSe, is based preferentially on electrons from the $d_{yz}$ orbitals of the iron atoms.
  • Iron pnictides are the only known family of unconventional high-temperature superconductors besides cuprates. Until recently, it was widely accepted that superconductivity is spin-fluctuation driven and intimately related to their fermiology, specifically, hole and electron pockets separated by the same wave vector that characterizes the dominant spin fluctuations, and supporting order parameters (OP) of opposite signs. This picture was questioned after the discovery of a new family, based on the FeSe layers, either intercalated or in the monolayer form. The critical temperatures there reach ~40 K, the same as in optimally doped bulk FeSe - despite the fact that intercalation removes the hole pockets from the Fermi level and, seemingly, undermines the basis for the spin-fluctuation theory and the idea of a sign-changing OP. In this paper, using the recently proposed phase-sensitive quasiparticle interference technique, we show that in LiOH intercalated FeSe compound the OP does change sign, albeit within the electronic pockets, and not between the hole and electron ones. This result unifies the pairing mechanism of iron based superconductors with or without the hole Fermi pockets and supports the conclusion that spin fluctuations play the key role in electron pairing.
  • The microscopic mechanism and the experimental identification of it in unconventional superconductors is one of the most vexing problems of contemporary condensed matter physics. We show that Raman spectroscopy provides a new avenue for this quest by probing the structure of the pairing interaction. As a prototypical example, we study the doping dependence of the Raman spectra in different symmetry channels in the s-wave superconductor ${\rm Ba_{1-x}K_xFe_2As_2}$ for $0.22\le x \le 0.70$. The spectra collected in the $B_{1g}$ symmetry channel reveal the existence of two collective modes which are indicative of the presence of two competing, yet subdominant, pairing tendencies of $d_{x^2-y^2}$ symmetry. A functional Renormalization Group (fRG) and random-phase approximation (RPA) study on this material confirms the presence of the two pairing tendencies within a spin-fluctuation scenario. The experimental doping dependence of these modes is also consistently matched by both fRG and RPA studies. Thus our findings strongly support a spin-fluctuation mediated pairing scenario.
  • We study spin-fluctuation-mediated superconductivity in the one-band Hubbard model. Higher order effective interactions in $U$ give rise to a superconducting instability which is very sensitive to changes in the Fermi surface topology arising as a function of doping and changes in the band structure. We show the superconducting phase diagram as a function of doping and next-nearest neighbor hopping in the limit of very small Coulomb interaction strength and discuss peculiarities arising at the phase boundaries separating different superconducting domains.
  • We propose that the low temperature discrepancy between simple d-wave models of the microwave conductivity and existing experiments on single crystals of YBCO can be resolved by including the scattering of quasiparticles from "holes" of the order parameter at impurity sites. Within a framework proposed previously, we find in particular excellent agreement with data of Hosseini et al. on slightly overdoped YBCO samples over the entire temperature range down to about 2-3K, and for a wide range of frequencies. Remaining discrepancies in the "universal" regime at very low temperatures are discussed.
  • It has been known for some time that, in three dimensions, arbitrarily weak disorder in unconventional superconductors with line nodes gives rise to a nonzero residual density of zero-energy quasiparticle states N(0), leading to characteristic low-temperature thermodynamic properties similar to those observed in cuprate and heavy-fermion systems. In a strictly two-dimensional model possibly appropriate for the cuprates, it has been argued that N(0) vanishes, however. We perform exact calculations for d- and extended s-wave superconductors with Lorentzian disorder and similar models with continuous disorder distribution, and show that in these cases the residual density of states is nonzero even in two dimensions. We discuss the reasons for this discrepancy, and the implications of our result for the cuprates.