• We present optical observations of an exceptional Type II supernova, ASASSN-15nx. Its peak luminosity at M_V = -20 mag is between those of typical core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) and super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe). The post-peak multi-band optical light curves show a remarkably long, linear decline with a steep slope of 2.5 mag / 100 d (i.e., an exponential decline in flux), through to the end of our observations at phase ~ 260d. In contrast, the light curves of the two major subclasses of SNe II, Type II-P ("plateau") and Type II-L ("linear"), always show breaks in slopes at phase ~100 d, before settling onto Co56 radioactive decay tails with a decline rate typically of about 1 mag / 100 d. The spectra of ASASSN-15nx do not exhibit the narrow emission-line features characteristic of Type IIn SNe, which can have a wide variety of light-curve shapes usually attributed to strong interactions with circumstellar medium (CSM). ASASSN-15nx also exhibits a number of peculiar spectroscopic properties, including a relatively weak H-alpha emission line that has an unusually triangularly-shaped profile with no absorption component. The physical origin giving rise to these peculiarities is unclear, while the long and linear post-peak light curve without a break likely suggests a single dominant powering mechanism. The light curve is consistent with being predominantly powered by the decay of a large amount of Ni56 (M_Ni = 1.6 +/- 0.2 M_sun), and substantial gamma-ray escape from the ejecta is needed to explain the steep light-curve slope, which is possibly due to a low-mass hydrogen envelope of the progenitor. Another possibility is strong CSM interactions mostly powering the light curve, and the CSM needs to be sculpted to produce the unique light-curve shape as well as avoid producing SN IIn-like narrow emission lines.
  • We present photometry, spectra, and spectropolarimetry of supernova (SN) 2012ab, mostly obtained over the course of $\sim 300$ days after discovery. SN 2012ab was a Type IIn (SN IIn) event discovered near the nucleus of spiral galaxy 2MASXJ12224762+0536247. While its light curve resembles that of SN 1998S, its spectral evolution does not. We see indications of CSM interaction in the strong intermediate-width emission features, the high luminosity (peak at absolute magnitude $M=-19.5$), and the lack of broad absorption features in the spectrum. The H$\alpha$ emission undergoes a peculiar transition. At early times it shows a broad blue emission wing out to $-14{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ and a truncated red wing. Then at late times ($>$ 100$\,$days) it shows a truncated blue wing and a very broad red emission wing out to roughly $+20{,}000$ km $\mathrm{s^{-1}}$. This late-time broad red wing probably arises in the reverse shock. Spectra also show an asymmetric intermediate-width H$\alpha$ component with stronger emission on the red side at late times. The evolution of the asymmetric profiles requires a density structure in the distant CSM that is highly aspherical. Our spectropolarimetric data also suggest asphericity with a strong continuum polarization of $\sim 1-3$% and depolarization in the H$\alpha$ line, indicating asphericity in the CSM at a level comparable to that in other SNe IIn. We estimate a mass-loss rate of $\dot{M} = 0.050\, {\rm M}_{\odot}\,\mathrm{yr^{-1}}$ for $v_{\rm pre} = 100$$\,$km$\,$$\mathrm{s^{-1}}$ extending back at least 75$\,$yr prior to the SN. The strong departure from axisymmetry in the CSM of SN 2012ab may suggest that the progenitor was an eccentric binary system undergoing eruptive mass loss.
  • Very few low-ionization broad absorption line (LoBAL) QSOs have been found at high redshifts to date. One high-redshift LoBAL QSO, J0122+1216, was recently discovered at the Lijiang 2.4-m Telescope with an initial redshift determination of 4.76. Aiming to investigate its physical properties, we carried out follow-up observations in the optical and near-IR spectroscopy. Near-IR spectra from UKIRT and P200 confirms that it is a LoBAL, with a new redshift determination of $4.82\pm0.01$ based on the \mgii~ emission-line. The new \mgii~ redshift determination reveals strong blueshifts and asymmetry of the high-ionization emission lines. We estimated a black hole mass of $\sim 2.3\times 10^9 M_\odot$ and Eddington ratio of $\sim 1.0$ according to the empirical \mgii-based single-epoch relation and bolometric correction factor. It is possible that strong outflows are the result of an extreme quasar environment driven by the high Eddington ratio. A lower limit on the outflowing kinetic power ($>0.9\% L_{Edd}$) was derived from both emission and absorption lines, indicating these outflows play a significant role in the feedback process to regulate the growth of its black hole as well as host galaxy evolution.
  • We present an ongoing, systematic search for extragalactic infrared transients, dubbed SPIRITS --- SPitzer InfraRed Intensive Transients Survey. In the first year, using Spitzer/IRAC, we searched 190 nearby galaxies with cadence baselines of one month and six months. We discovered over 1958 variables and 43 transients. Here, we describe the survey design and highlight 14 unusual infrared transients with no optical counterparts to deep limits, which we refer to as SPRITEs (eSPecially Red Intermediate Luminosity Transient Events). SPRITEs are in the infrared luminosity gap between novae and supernovae, with [4.5] absolute magnitudes between -11 and -14 (Vega-mag) and [3.6]-[4.5] colors between 0.3 mag and 1.6 mag. The photometric evolution of SPRITEs is diverse, ranging from < 0.1 mag/yr to > 7 mag/yr. SPRITEs occur in star-forming galaxies. We present an in-depth study of one of them, SPIRITS 14ajc in Messier 83, which shows shock-excited molecular hydrogen emission. This shock may have been triggered by the dynamic decay of a non-hierarchical system of massive stars that led to either the formation of a binary or a proto-stellar merger.
  • We present optical/near-infrared spectroscopy and photometry of the supernova (SN) PS15si. This object was originally identified as a Type IIn SN, but here we argue that it should be reclassified as a Type Ia SN with narrow hydrogen lines originating from interaction with circumstellar matter (CSM; i.e., SN Ia/IIn or SN Ia-CSM). Based on deep nondetections 27 days before discovery, we infer that this SN was discovered around or slightly before optical maximum, and we estimate the approximate time that it reached R-band maximum based on comparison with other SNe Ia/IIn. In terms of spectral morphology, we find that PS15si can be matched to a range of SN Ia spectral types, although SN 1991T-like SNe Ia provides the most self-consistent match. While this observation agrees with analysis of most other SNe Ia/IIn, we find that the implied CSM luminosity is too low to account for the overall luminosity of the SN at a time when the CSM should outshine the underlying SN by a few magnitudes. We infer that the similarity between PS15si and the hot, overluminous, high-ionisation spectrum of SN 1991T is a consequence of a spectrum that originates in ejecta layers that are heated by ultraviolet/X-ray radiation from CSM interaction. In addition, PS15si may have rebrightened over a short timescale in the B and V bands around 85 days after discovery, perhaps indicating that the SN ejecta are interacting with a local enhancement in CSM produced by clumps or a shell at large radii.
  • We present spectropolarimetric observations of the nearby Type Ia SN 2014J in M82 over six epochs: +0, +7, +23, +51, +77, +109, and +111 days with respect to B-band maximum. The strong continuum polarization, which is constant with time, shows a wavelength dependence unlike that produced by linear dichroism in Milky Way dust. The observed polarization may be due entirely to interstellar dust or include a circumstellar scattering component. We find that the polarization angle aligns with the magnetic field of the host galaxy, arguing for an interstellar origin. Additionally, we confirm a peak in polarization at short wavelengths that would imply $R_V < 2 $ along the light of sight, in agreement with earlier polarization measurements. For illustrative purposes, we include a two component fit to the continuum polarization of our +51 day epoch that combines a circumstellar scattering component with interstellar dust where scattering can account for over half of the polarization at $4000$ \AA. Upon removal of the interstellar polarization signal, SN 2014J exhibits very low levels of continuum polarization. Asymmetries in the distribution of elements within the ejecta are visible through moderate levels of time-variable polarization in accordance with the Si II 6355 \AA absorption line. At maximum light, the line polarization reaches $\sim0.6$% and decreases to $\sim0.4\%$ one week later. This feature also forms a loop on the $q_{RSP}$-$u_{RSP}$ plane illustrating that the ion does not have an axisymmetric distribution. The observed polarization properties suggest the explosion geometry of SN 2014J is generally spheroidal with a clumpy distribution of silicon.
  • While SN impostors resemble the Great Eruption of eta Car in the sense that their spectra show narrow H lines and they have typical peak absolute magnitudes of -13 to -14 mag, most extragalactic events observed so far are quite different from eta Car in duration. Their bright phases typically last for 100~d or less, rather than persisting for several years. The transient object UGC2773-OT had a similar peak absolute magnitude to other SN impostors, but with a gradual 5-yr prediscovery rise. In the 6 yr since discovery, it has faded very slowly (0.26 mag/yr). Overall, we suggest that its decade-long eruption is so far the best known analog of eta Car's 19th century eruption. We discuss extensive spectroscopy of the ongoing eruption. The spectra show interesting changes in velocity and line shape that we discuss in detail, including an asymmetric Halpha emission line that we show is consistent with the ejection of a bipolar nebula that could be very much like the Homunculus of eta Car. Moreover, changes in the line width, line profile, blue excess emission resembling that of Type IIn supernovae, and the intensity of Halpha suggest the presence of strong circumstellar interaction in the eruption at late times. This supports the hypothesis that the extended plateau of eta Car's eruption may have been powered by shock interaction as well. One interesting difference compared to eta Car, however, is that UGC2773-OT so far does not exhibit the repeated brief spikes in luminosity that have been associated with binary periastron events.
  • We present seven epochs of spectropolarimetry of the Type IIb supernova (SN) 2011dh in M51, spanning 86 days of its evolution. The first epoch was obtained 9 days after the explosion, when the photosphere was still in the depleted hydrogen layer of the stripped-envelope progenitor. Continuum polarization is securely detected at the level of P~0.5% through day 14 and appears to diminish by day 30, which is different from the prevailing trends suggested by studies of other core-collapse SNe. Time-variable modulations in P and position angle are detected across P-Cygni line features. H-alpha and HeI polarization peak after 30 days and exhibit position angles roughly aligned with the earlier continuum, while OI and CaII appear to be geometrically distinct. We discuss several possibilities to explain the evolution of the continuum and line polarization, including the potential effects of a tidally deformed progenitor star, aspherical radioactive heating by fast-rising plumes of Ni-56 from the core, oblique shock breakout, or scattering by circumstellar material. While these possibilities are plausible and guided by theoretical expectations, they are not unique solutions to the data. The construction of more detailed hydrodynamic and radiative-transfer models that incorporate complex aspherical geometries will be required to further elucidate the nature of the polarized radiation from SN 2011dh and other Type IIb supernovae.
  • The effect of metallicity on the observed light of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) could lead to systematic errors as the absolute magnitudes of local and distant SNe Ia are compared to measure luminosity distances and determine cosmological parameters. The UV light may be especially sensitive to metallicity, though different modeling methods disagree as to the magnitude, wavelength dependence, and even the sign of the effect. The outer density structure, ^56 Ni, and to a lesser degree asphericity, also impact the UV. We compute synthetic photometry of various metallicity-dependent models and compare to UV/optical photometry from the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope. We find that the scatter in the mid-UV to near-UV colors is larger than predicted by changes in metallicity alone and is not consistent with reddening. We demonstrate that a recently employed method to determine relative abundances using UV spectra can be done using UVOT photometry, but we warn that accurate results require an accurate model of the cause of the variations. The abundance of UV photometry now available should provide constraints on models that typically rely on UV spectroscopy for constraining metallicity, density, and other parameters. Nevertheless, UV spectroscopy for a variety of SN explosions is still needed to guide the creation of accurate models. A better understanding of the influences affecting the UV is important for using SNe Ia as cosmological probes, as the UV light may test whether SNe Ia are significantly affected by evolutionary effects.
  • We present spectropolarimetry of SN 2009ip throughout the evolution of its 2012 explosion. During the initial 2012a phase, when the source spectrum exhibits broad P-Cygni lines, we measure a V-band polarization of P~0.9% at a position angle of ~166 deg, indicating substantial asphericity for the 2012a outflow. Near the subsequent peak of the 2012b phase, when the spectrum shows signs of intense interaction with circumstellar material (CSM), we measure P~1.7% at a position angle of 72 deg, indicating a separate physical component of polarization, which has a higher degree of asphericity than the 2012a outflow and an orthogonal axis of symmetry on the sky. Around 30 days past peak, which is coincident with a bump in the declining light curve, we measure P~0.7% and significant variations in P across some broad lines, particularly HeI/NaI. By 60 days past peak the source appears to be approaching a low value of interstellar polarization (P<0.2%). The results are consistent with a scenario in which a potentially bipolar explosion during 2012a impacts a toroidal distribution of CSM, thereby causing the 2012b brightening. Orthogonality between the 2012a and 2012b geometries is inconsistent with the hypothesis that the 2012a event launched the CSM that was hit 40 days later by material from the 2012b event. Rather, the aspherical CSM probably has a separate origin associated with the outbursts of the stellar progenitor during prior years. Previous calculations that assumed spherical symmetry for the CSM have underestimated the required explosion energy, as the results suggest that <10% of the fast SN ejecta participated in strong CSM interaction during the 2012b phase. In light of the spectropolarimetric results, a kinetic energy of 1e51 erg for the ejecta is difficult to avoid, supporting the interpretation that the 2012 outburst was the result of a core-collapse supernova explosion (abridged)
  • Among Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) exist a class of overluminous objects whose ejecta mass is inferred to be larger than the canonical Chandrasekhar mass. We present and discuss the UV/optical photometric light curves, colors, absolute magnitudes, and spectra of three candidate Super-Chandrasekhar mass SNe--2009dc, 2011aa, and 2012dn--observed with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. The light curves are at the broad end for SNe Ia, with the light curves of SN~2011aa being amongst the broadest ever observed. We find all three to have very blue colors which may provide a means of excluding these overluminous SNe from cosmological analysis, though there is some overlap with the bluest of "normal" SNe Ia. All three are overluminous in their UV absolute magnitudes compared to normal and broad SNe Ia, but SNe 2011aa and 2012dn are not optically overluminous compared to normal SNe Ia. The integrated luminosity curves of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn in the UVOT range (1600-6000 Angstroms) are only half as bright as SN~2009dc, implying a smaller 56Ni yield. While not enough to strongly affect the bolometric flux, the early time mid-UV flux makes a significant contribution at early times. The strong spectral features in the mid-UV spectra of SNe 2009dc and 2012dn suggest a higher temperature and lower opacity to be the cause of the UV excess rather than a hot, smooth blackbody from shock interaction. Further work is needed to determine the ejecta and 56Ni masses of SNe 2011aa and 2012dn and fully explain their high UV luminosities.
  • We compare early ultraviolet (UV) observations of Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) with theoretical predictions for the brightness of the shock associated with the collision between SN ejecta and a companion star. Our simple method is independent of the intrinsic flux from the SN and treats the flux observed with the Swift/Ultra-Violet Optical Telescope (UVOT) as conservative upper limits on the shock brightness. Comparing this limit with the predicted flux for various shock models, we constrain the geometry of the SN progenitor-companion system. We find the model of a 1 M_sun red supergiant companion in Roche lobe overflow to be excluded at a 95% confidence level for most individual SNe for all but the most unfavorable viewing angles. For the sample of 12 SNe taken together, the upper limits on the viewing angle are inconsistent with the expected distribution of viewing angles for RG stars as the majority of companions with high confidence. The separation distance constraints do allow MS companions. A better understanding of the UV flux arising from the SN itself as well as continued UV observations of young SNe Ia will further constrain the possible progenitors of SNe Ia.
  • We present the earliest ultraviolet (UV) observations of the bright Type Ia supernova SN 2011fe/PTF11kly in the nearby galaxy M101 at a distance of only 6.4 Mpc. It was discovered shortly after explosion by the Palomar Transient Factory and first observed by Swift/UVOT about a day after explosion. The early UV light is well-defined, with ~20 data points per filter in the five days after explosion. These early and well-sampled UV observations form new template light curves for comparison with observations of other SNe Ia at low and high redshift. We report fits from semi-empirical models of the explosion and find the time evolution of the early UV flux to be well fit by the superposition of two parabolic curves. Finally, we use the early UV flux measurements to examine a possible shock interaction with a non-degenerate companion. From models predicting the measurable shock emission, we find that even a solar mass companion at a distance of a few solar radii is unlikely at more than 95% confidence.
  • SN 2002es is a peculiar subluminous Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) with a combination of observed characteristics never before seen in a SN Ia. At maximum light, SN 2002es shares spectroscopic properties with the underluminous SN 1991bg subclass of SNe Ia, but with substantially lower expansion velocities (~6000 km/s) more typical of the SN 2002cx subclass. Photometrically, SN 2002es differs from both SN 1991bg-like and SN 2002cx-like supernovae. Although at maximum light it is subluminous (M_B=-17.78 mag), SN 2002es has a relatively broad light curve (Dm15(B)=1.28 +/- 0.04 mag), making it a significant outlier in the light-curve width vs. luminosity relationship. We estimate a 56Ni mass of 0.17 +/- 0.05 M_sun synthesized in the explosion, relatively low for a SN Ia. One month after maximum light, we find an unexpected plummet in the bolometric luminosity. The late-time decay of the light curves is inconsistent with our estimated 56Ni mass, indicating that either the light curve was not completely powered by 56Ni decay or the ejecta became optically thin to gamma-rays within a month after maximum light. The host galaxy is classified as an S0 galaxy with little to no star formation, indicating the progenitor of SN 2002es is likely from an old stellar population. We also present a less extensive dataset for SN 1999bh, an object which shares similar observed properties. Both objects were found as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, allowing us to estimate that these objects should account for ~2.5% of SNe Ia within a fixed volume. We find that current theoretical models are unable to explain the observed of characteristics of SN 2002es.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • We examine the absolute magnitudes and light-curve shapes of 14 nearby(redshift z = 0.004--0.027) Type Ia supernovae (SNe~Ia) observed in the ultraviolet (UV) with the Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope. Colors and absolute magnitudes are calculated using both a standard Milky Way (MW) extinction law and one for the Large Magellanic Cloud that has been modified by circumstellar scattering. We find very different behavior in the near-UV filters (uvw1_rc covering ~2600-3300 A after removing optical light, and u ~3000--4000 A) compared to a mid-UV filter (uvm2 ~2000-2400 A). The uvw1_rc-b colors show a scatter of ~0.3 mag while uvm2-b scatters by nearly 0.9 mag. Similarly, while the scatter in colors between neighboring filters is small in the optical and somewhat larger in the near-UV, the large scatter in the uvm2-uvw1 colors implies significantly larger spectral variability below 2600 A. We find that in the near-UV the absolute magnitudes at peak brightness of normal SNe Ia in our sample are correlated with the optical decay rate with a scatter of 0.4 mag, comparable to that found for the optical in our sample. However, in the mid-UV the scatter is larger, ~1 mag, possibly indicating differences in metallicity. We find no strong correlation between either the UV light-curve shapes or the UV colors and the UV absolute magnitudes. With larger samples, the UV luminosity might be useful as an additional constraint to help determine distance, extinction, and metallicity in order to improve the utility of SNe Ia as standardized candles.
  • A detailed study spanning approximately a year has been conducted on the Type Ib supernova 2007Y. Imaging was obtained from X-ray to radio wavelengths, and a comprehensive set of multi-band (w2m2w1u'g'r'i'UBVYJHKs) light curves and optical spectroscopy is presented. A virtually complete bolometric light curve is derived, from which we infer a (56)Ni-mass of 0.06 M_sun. The early spectrum strongly resembles SN 2005bf and exhibits high-velocity features of CaII and H_alpha; during late epochs the spectrum shows evidence of a ejecta-wind interaction. Nebular emission lines have similar widths and exhibit profiles that indicate a lack of major asymmetry in the ejecta. Late phase spectra are modeled with a non-LTE code, from which we find (56)Ni, O and total-ejecta masses (excluding He) to be 0.06, 0.2 and 0.42 M_sun, respectively, below 4,500 km/s. The (56)Ni mass confirms results obtained from the bolometric light curve. The oxygen abundance suggests the progenitor was most likely a ~3.3 M_sun He core star that evolved from a zero-age-main-sequence mass of 10-13 M_sun. The explosion energy is determined to be ~10^50 erg, and the mass-loss rate of the progenitor is constrained from X-ray and radio observations to be <~10^-6 M_sun/yr. SN 2007Y is among the least energetic normal Type Ib supernovae ever studied.
  • We present ultravioliet (UV) observations of supernovae (SNe) obtained with the UltraViolet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) on board the Swift spacecraft. This is the largest sample of UV light curves from any single instrument and covers all major SN types and most subtypes. The UV light curves of SNe Ia are fairly homogenous while SNe Ib/c and IIP show more variety in their light curve shapes. The UV-optical colors clearly differentiate SNe Ia and IIP, particularly at early times. The color evolution of SNe IIP, however, makes their colors similar to SNe Ia at about 20 days after explosion. SNe Ib/c are shown to have varied UV-optical colors. The use of UV colors to help type SNe will be important for high redshift SNe discovered in optical observations. These data can be added to ground based optical and near infrared data to create bolometric light curves of individual objects and as checks on generic bolometric corrections used in the absence of UV data. This sample can also be compared with rest-frame UV observations of high redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.
  • We review recent UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe) with the Swift Ultra-violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) during its first two years. Rest-frame UV photometry is useful for differentiating SN types by exploiting the UV-optical spectral shape and more subtle UV features. This is useful for the real-time classification of local and high-redshift SNe using only photometry. Two remarkable SNe Ib/c were observed with UVOT -- SN2006jc was a UV bright SN Ib. Swift observations of GRB060218/SN2006aj began shortly after the explosion and show a UV-bright peak followed by a UV-faint SN bump. UV observations are also useful for constraining the temperature and ionization structure of SNe IIP. Rest-frame UV observations of all types are important for understanding the extinction, temperature, and bolometric luminosity of SNe and to interpret the observations of high redshift SNe observed at optical wavelengths.
  • We analyze the Type II Plateau supernovae (SN II-P) 2005cs and 2006bp with the non-LTE model atmosphere code CMFGEN. We fit 13 spectra in the first month for SN 2005cs and 18 for SN 2006bp. {\sl Swift} ultraviolet photometry and ground-based optical photometry calibrate each spectrum. Our analysis shows both objects were discovered less than 3 days after they exploded, making these the earliest SN II-P spectra ever studied. They reveal broad and very weak lines from highly-ionized fast ejecta with an extremely steep density profile. We identify He{\sc ii} 4686\AA emission in the SN 2006bp ejecta. Days later, the spectra resemble the prototypical Type II-P SN 1999em, which had a supergiant-like photospheric composition. Despite the association of SN 2005cs with possible X-ray emission, the emergent UV and optical light comes from the photosphere, not from circumstellar emission. We surmise that the very steep density fall-off we infer at early times may be a fossil of the combined actions of the shock wave passage and radiation driving at shock breakout. Based on tailored CMFGEN models, the direct-fitting technique and the Expanding Photosphere Method both yield distances and explosion times that agree within a few percent. We derive a distance to NGC 5194, the host of SN 2005cs, of 8.9$\pm$0.5 Mpc and 17.5$\pm$0.8 Mpc for SN 2006bp in NGC 3953. The luminosity of SN 2006bp is 1.5 times that of SN 1999em, and 6 times that of SN 2005cs. Reliable distances to Type II-P supernovae that do not depend on a small range in luminosity provide an independent route to the Hubble Constant and improved constraints on other cosmological parameters.
  • We report early photospheric-phase observations of the Type IIP Supernova (SN) 2005cs obtained by Swift's Ultraviolet-Optical and X-Ray Telescopes. Observations started within two days of discovery and continued regularly for three weeks. During this time the V-band magnitude remained essentially constant, while the UV was initially bright but steadily faded until below the brightness of an underlying UV-bright HII region. This UV decay is similar to SNe II observed by the International Ultraviolet Explorer. UV grism spectra show the P-Cygni absorption of MgII 2798A, indicating a photospheric origin of the UV flux. Based on non-LTE model atmosphere calculations with the CMFGEN code, we associate the rapid evolution of the UV flux with the cooling of the ejecta, the peak of the spectral energy distribution (SED) shifting from ~700A on June 30th to ~1200A on July 5th. Furthermore, the corresponding recombination of the ejecta, e.g., the transition from FeIII to FeII, induces considerable strengthening of metal line-blanketing at and above the photosphere, blocking more effectively this fading UV flux. SN2005cs was not detected in X-rays, and the upper limit to the X-ray luminosity yields a limit to the mass loss rate of the progenitor of about 10^-5 solar masses per year. Overall, Swift presents a unique opportunity to capture the early and fast evolution of Type II SNe in the UV, providing additional constraints on the reddening, the SED shortward of 4000A, and the ionization state and temperature of the photon-decoupling regions.
  • The Advanced Compton Telescope (ACT), the next major step in gamma-ray astronomy, will probe the fires where chemical elements are formed by enabling high-resolution spectroscopy of nuclear emission from supernova explosions. During the past two years, our collaboration has been undertaking a NASA mission concept study for ACT. This study was designed to (1) transform the key scientific objectives into specific instrument requirements, (2) to identify the most promising technologies to meet those requirements, and (3) to design a viable mission concept for this instrument. We present the results of this study, including scientific goals and expected performance, mission design, and technology recommendations.
  • We have conducted a systematic and comprehensive monitoring programme of the Type Ia supernova 2000cx at late phases using the VLT and HST. The VLT observations cover phases 360 to 480 days past maximum brightness and include photometry in the BVRIJH bands, together with a single epoch in each of U and Ks. While the optical bands decay by about 1.4 mag per 100 days, we find that the near-IR magnitudes stay virtually constant during the observed period. This means that the importance of the near-IR to the bolometric light curve increases with time. The finding is also in agreement with our detailed modeling of a Type Ia supernova in the nebular phase. In these models, the increased importance of the near-IR is a temperature effect. We note that this complicates late-time studies where often only the V band is well monitored. In particular, it is not correct to assume that any optical band follows the bolometric light curve at these phases, and any conclusions based on such assumptions, e.g., regarding positron-escape, must be regarded as premature. A very simple model where all positrons are trapped can reasonably well account for the observations. The nickel mass deduced from the positron tail of this light curve is lower than found from the peak brightness, providing an estimate of the fraction of late-time emission that is outside of the observed wavelength range. Our detailed models show the signature of an infrared catastrophe at these epochs, which is not supported by the observations.
  • The HEGRA Cherenkov telescope array group recently reported a steady and extended unidentified TeV gamma-ray source lying at the outskirts of Cygnus OB2. This is the most massive stellar association known in the Galaxy, estimated to contain ~2600 OB type members alone. It has been previously argued that the large scale shocks and turbulence induced by the multiple interacting supersonic winds from the many young stars in such associations may play a role in accelerating Galactic cosmic rays. Indeed, Cyg OB2 also coincides with the non-variable MeV-GeV range unidentified EGRET source, 3EG 2033+4118. We report on the near-simultaneous follow-up observations of the extended TeV source region with the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory and the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope obtained in order to explore this possibility. Analysis of the CO, HI, and IRAS 100 micron emissions shows that the TeV source region coincides with an outlying sub-group of powerful OB stars which have evacuated or destroyed much of the ambient atomic, molecular and dust material, and which may be related to the very high-energy emissions. An interesting SNR-like structure is also revealed near the TeV source region in the CO, HI and radio emission maps. Applying a numerical simulation which accurately tracks the radio to gamma-ray emission from primary hadrons as well as primary and secondary e+/-, we find that the broadband spectrum of the TeV source region favors a predominantly nucleonic - rather than electronic - origin of the high-energy flux, though deeper X-ray and radio observations are needed to confirm this. A very reasonable, ~0.1%, conversion efficiency of Cyg OB2's extreme stellar wind mechanical luminosity to nucleonic acceleration to ~PeV (10^15 eV) energies is sufficient to explain the multifrequency emissions.
  • The origins of all extra-solar cosmic rays -- both the ultra high-energy and lower energy Galactic variety -- remain unclear. It has been argued that the large scale shocks and turbulence induced by the multiple interacting supersonic winds from the many hot stars in young stellar associations may play a role in accelerating Galactic cosmic rays -- with or without the associated multiple supernova remnants (eg. Cesarsky & Montmerle, 1983; Bykov 2001). In this context, the report by the HEGRA Cherenkov telescope group of a steady and extended unidentified TeV gamma-ray source lying at the outskirts of Cygnus OB2 is particularly significant. This is the most massive stellar association known in the Galaxy, estimated to contain ~2600 OB type members alone indeed, Cyg OB2 also coincides with the non-variable MeV-GeV range unidentified EGRET source, 3EG 2033+4118. We summarise here the near-simultaneous follow-up observations of the extended TeV source region with the CHANDRA X-ray Observatory and the Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope. Applying a numerical simulation which accurately tracks the radio to gamma-ray emission from primary hadrons as well as primary and secondary e+/-, we find that the broadband spectrum of the TeV source region favors a predominantly nucleonic rather than electronic origin of the high-energy flux, though deeper X-ray and radio observations will help confirm this. A very reasonable, ~0.1%, conversion efficiency of Cyg OB2's extreme stellar wind mechanical luminosity to nucleonic acceleration to ~PeV (10^15 eV) energies is sufficient to explain the multifrequency emissions.