• We report follow-up observations of two gravitational lens candidates identified in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) dataset. We have confirmed that SDSS J102111.02+491330.4 is a previously unknown gravitationally lensed quasar. This lens system exhibits two images of a $z = 1.72$ quasar, with an image separation of $1{\farcs}14 \pm 0.04$. Optical and near-IR imaging of the system reveals the presence of the lensing galaxy between the two quasar images. Observations of SDSS J112012.12+671116.0 indicate that it is more likely a binary quasar than a gravitational lens. This system has two quasars at a redshift of $z = 1.49$, with an angular separation of $1{\farcs}49 \pm 0.02$. However, the two quasars have markedly different SEDs and no lens galaxy is apparent in optical and near-IR images of this system. We also present a list of 31 SDSS lens candidates which follow-up observations have confirmed are \textit{not} gravitational lenses.
  • We report the discovery of a new dwarf spheroidal satellite of M31, Andromeda IX, based on resolved stellar photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Using both SDSS and public archival data we have estimated its distance and other physical properties, and compared these to the properties of a previously known dwarf spheroidal companion, Andromeda V, also observed by SDSS. Andromeda IX is the lowest surface brightness galaxy found to date (mu_{V} ~ 26.8 mag arcsec^-2), and at the distance we estimate from the position of the tip of Andromeda IX's red giant branch, (m - M)_{0} ~ 24.5 (805 kpc), Andromeda IX would also be the faintest galaxy known (M_{V} ~ -8.3).
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey has revealed an overdensity of luminous red giant stars ~ 3 degrees (40 projected kpc) to the northeast of M31, which we have called Andromeda NE. The line-of-sight distance to Andromeda NE is within approximately 50 kpc of M31; Andromeda NE is not a physically unrelated projection. Andromeda NE has a g-band absolute magnitude of ~ -11.6 and central surface brightness of ~ 29 mag/sq.arcsec, making it nearly two orders of magnitude more diffuse than any known Local Group dwarf galaxy at that luminosity. Based on its distance and morphology, Andromeda NE is likely undergoing tidal disruption. Andromeda NE's red giant branch color is unlike that of M31's present-day outer disk or the stellar stream reported by Ibata et al. (2001), arguing against a direct link between Andromeda NE and these structures. However, Andromeda NE has a red giant branch color similar to that of the G1 clump; it is possible that these structures are both material torn off of M31's disk in the distant past, or that these are both part of one ancient stellar stream.
  • The Sloan Digital Sky Survey is the largest redshift survey conducted to date, and the principal survey observations have all been conducted on the dedicated SDSS 2.5m and 0.5m telescopes at Apache Point Observatory. While the whole survey has many unique features, this article concentrates on a description of the systems surrounding the dual fibre-input spectrographs that obtain all the survey spectra and that are capable of recording 5,760 individual spectra per night on an industrial, consistent, mass-production basis. It is hoped that the successes and lessons learned will prove instructive for future large spectrographic surveys.
  • We report the discovery of five very cool white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Four are ultracool, exhibiting strong collision induced absorption (CIA) from molecular hydrogen and are similar in color to the three previously known coolest white dwarfs, SDSS J1337+00, LHS 3250 and LHS 1402. The fifth, an ultracool white dwarf candidate, shows milder CIA flux suppression and has a color and spectral shape similar to WD 0346+246. All five new white dwarfs are faint (g > 18.9) and have significant proper motions. One of the new ultracool white dwarfs, SDSS J0947, appears to be in a binary system with a slightly warmer (T_{eff} ~ 5000K) white dwarf companion.
  • We present a detailed observational strategy for finding Near Earth Objects (NEOs) with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope. We investigate strategies in normal, unbinned mode as well as binning the CCDs 2x2 or 3x3, which affects the sky coverage rate and the limiting apparent magnitude. We present results from 1 month, 3 year and 10 year simulations of such surveys. For each cadence and binning mode, we evaluate the possibility of achieving the Spaceguard goal of detecting 90% of 1 km NEOs (absolute magnitude H <= 18 for an albedo of 0.1). We find that an unbinned survey is most effective at detecting H <= 20 NEOs in our sample. However, a 3x3 binned survey reaches the Spaceguard Goal after only seven years of operation. As the proposed large survey telescopes (PanStarss; LSST) are at least 5-10 years from operation, an SDSS NEO survey could make a significant contribution to the detection and photometric characterization of the NEO population.
  • In previous work on galaxy clusters, several authors reported a discovery of an unusual population of galaxies, which have spiral morphologies, but do not show any star formation activity. These galaxies are called ``passive spirals'', and have been interesting since it has been difficult to understand the existence of such galaxies. Using a volume limited sample (0.05<z<0.1 and Mr<-20.5; 25813 galaxies) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, we have found 73 (0.28$\pm$0.03%) passive spiral galaxies and studied their environments. It is found that passive spiral galaxies live in local galaxy density 1-2 Mpc$^{-2}$ and 1-10 cluster-centric virial radius. Thus the origins of passive spiral galaxies are likely to be cluster related. These characteristic environments coincide with the previously reported environment where galaxy star formation rate suddenly declines and the so-called morphology-density relation turns. It is likely that the same physical mechanism is responsible for all of these observational results. The existence of passive spiral galaxies suggests that a physical mechanism that works calmly is preferred to dynamical origins such as major merger/interaction since such a mechanism can destroy spiral arm structures. Compared with observed cluster galaxy evolution such as the Butcher-Oemler effect and the morphological Butcher-Oemler effect, passive spiral galaxies are likely to be a galaxy population in transition between red, elliptical/S0 galaxies in low redshift clusters and blue, spiral galaxies more numerous in higher redshift clusters.
  • We report the discovery of a new gravitationally lensed quasar from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, SDSS J092455.87+021924.9 (SDSS J0924+0219). This object was selected from among known SDSS quasars by an algorithm that was designed to select another known SDSS lensed quasar (SDSS 1226-0006A,B). Five separate components, three of which are unresolved, are identified in photometric follow-up observations obtained with the Magellan Consortium's 6.5m Walter Baade telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. Two of the unresolved components (designated A and B) are confirmed to be quasars with z=1.524; the velocity difference is less than 100 km sec^{-1} according to spectra taken with the W. M. Keck Observatory's Keck II telescope on Mauna Kea. A third stellar component, designated C, has the colors of a quasar with redshift similar to components A and B. The maximum separation of the point sources is 1.78". The other two sources, designated G and D, are resolved. Component G appears to be the best candidate for the lensing galaxy. Although component D is near the expected position of the fourth lensed component in a four image lens system, its properties are not consistent with being the image of a quasar at z~1.5. Nevertheless, the identical redshifts of components A and B and the presence of component C strongly suggest that this object is a gravitational lens. Our observations support the idea that a foreground object reddens the fourth lensed component and that another unmodeled effect (such as micro- or milli-lensing) demagnificates it, but we cannot rule out the possibility that SDSS0924+0219 is an example of the relatively rare class of ``three component'' lens systems.
  • [Abridged] We present here a new and homogeneous sample of 3340 galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) based solely on the observed strength of their Hdelta absorption line. These galaxies are commonly known as ``post-starburst'' or ``E+A'' galaxies, and the study of these galaxies has been severely hampered by the lack of a large, statistical sample of such galaxies. In this paper, we rectify this problem by selecting a sample of galaxies which possess an absorption Hdelta equivalent width of EW(Hdelta_max) - Delta EW(Hdelta_max) > 4A from 106682 galaxies in the SDSS. We have performed extensive tests on our catalog including comparing different methodologies of measuring the Hdelta absorption and studying the effects of stellar absorption, dust extinction, emission-filling and measurement error. The measured abundance of our Hdelta-selected (HDS) galaxies is 2.6 +/- 0.1% of all galaxies within a volume-limited sample of 0.05<z<0.1 and M(r*)<-20.5, which is consistent with previous studies of such galaxies in the literature. We find that only 25 of our HDS galaxies in this volume-limited sample (3.5+/-0.7%) show no evidence for OII and Halpha emission, thus indicating that true E+A (or k+a) galaxies are extremely rare objects at low redshift, i.e., only 0.09+/-0.02% of all galaxies in this volume-limited sample are true E+A galaxies. In contrast, 89+/-5% of our HDS galaxies in the volume-limited sample have significant detections of the OII and Halpha emission lines. We find 27 galaxies in our volume-limited HDS sample that possess no detectable OII emission, but do however possess detectable Halpha emission. These galaxies may be dusty star-forming galaxies. We provide the community with this new catalog of Hdelta-selected galaxies to aid in the understanding of these galaxies.
  • The use of wide-field multi-object fiber-input spectrographs for large redshift surveys introduces the possibility of variations in the observed signal-to-noise ratio across the survey area due to errors in positioning the fibers with respect to the target image positions, leading to position-dependent errors in the survey catalog. This paper brings together a comprehensive description of the sources of fiber-to-image position errors in different instrument designs, and quantifies their effects on the efficiency with which signal is recorded. For point sources, a function relating a fractional efficiency and an equivalent aperture correction to the fiber-to-image position error, the fiber diameter and the image size is plotted for typical values of fiber and image sizes found in current instruments. The tools required by observers to maximize the efficiency of fiber-spectrographic surveys are discussed.
  • The discovery of an optical counterpart to GRB010222 (detected by BeppoSAX; Piro 2001) was announced 4.4 hrs after the burst by Henden (2001a). The Sloan Digital Sky Survey's 0.5m photometric telescope (PT) and 2.5m survey telescope were used to observe the afterglow of GRB010222 starting 4.8 hours after the GRB. The 0.5m PT observed the afterglow in five, 300 sec g' band exposures over the course of half an hour, measuring a temporal decay rate in this short period of F_nu \propto t^{-1.0+/-0.5}. The 2.5m camera imaged the counterpart nearly simultaneously in five filters (u' g' r' i' z'), with r' = 18.74+/-0.02 at 12:10 UT. These multicolor observations, corrected for reddening and the afterglow's temporal decay, are well fit by the power-law F_nu \propto nu^{-0.90+/-0.03} with the exception of the u' band UV flux which is 20% below this slope. We examine possible interpretations of this spectral shape, including source extinction in a star forming region.
  • The Chile-UK quasar survey, a new-generation 140 deg^2 UVX survey to B = 20, is now \sim 25 per cent complete. The catalogue currently contains 319 quasars and 93 emission line galaxies. Using the minimal-spanning tree method, we have independently confirmed the \sim 200 h^-1 Mpc group of quasars at z \simeq 1.3 discovered by Clowes & Campusano (1991). We have discovered a new \sim 150 h^-1 Mpc group of 13 quasars at median z \simeq 1.51. The null hypothesis of a uniform, random distribution is rejected at a level of significance of 0.003 for both groups.