• We study the behaviour of double-stranded RNA under twist and tension using oxRNA, a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Introducing explicit salt-dependence into the model allows us to directly compare our results to data from recent single-molecule experiments. The model reproduces extension curves as a function of twist and stretching force, including the buckling transition and the behaviour of plectoneme structures. For negative supercoiling, we predict denaturation bubble formation in plectoneme end-loops, suggesting preferential plectoneme localisation in weak base sequences. OxRNA exhibits a positive twist-stretch coupling constant, in agreement with recent experimental observations.
  • We introduce an extended version of oxDNA, a coarse-grained model of DNA designed to capture the thermodynamic, structural and mechanical properties of single- and double-stranded DNA. By including explicit major and minor grooves, and by slightly modifying the coaxial stacking and backbone-backbone interactions, we improve the ability of the model to treat large (kilobase-pair) structures such as DNA origami which are sensitive to these geometric features. Further, we extend the model, which was previously parameterised to just one salt concentration ([Na$^+$]=0.5M), so that it can be used for a range of salt concentrations including those corresponding to physiological conditions. Finally, we use new experimental data to parameterise the oxDNA potential so that consecutive adenine bases stack with a different strength to consecutive thymine bases, a feature which allows a more accurate treatment of systems where the flexibility of single-stranded regions is important. We illustrate the new possibilities opened up by the updated model, oxDNA2, by presenting results from simulations of the structure of large DNA objects and by using the model to investigate some salt-dependent properties of DNA.
  • We study the thermodynamics and kinetics of an RNA toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction with a recently developed coarse-grained model of RNA. Strand displacement, during which a single strand displaces a different strand previously bound to a complementary substrate strand, is an essential mechanism in active nucleic acid nanotechnology and has also been hypothesized to occur in vivo. We study the rate of displacement reactions as a function of the length of the toehold and temperature and make two experimentally testable predictions: that the displacement is faster if the toehold is placed at the 5' end of the substrate and that the displacement slows down with increasing temperature for longer toeholds.
  • We test the performances of two different approaches to the computation of forces for molecular dynamics simulations on Graphics Processing Units. A "vertex-based" approach, where a computing thread is started per particle, is compared to a newly proposed "edge-based" approach, where a thread is started per each potentially non-zero interaction. We find that the former is more efficient for systems with many simple interactions per particle, while the latter is more efficient if the system has more complicated interactions or fewer of them. By comparing computation times on more and less recent GPU technology, we predict that, if the current trend of increasing the number of processing cores - as opposed to their computing power - remains, the "edge-based" approach will gradually become the most efficient choice in an increasing number of cases.
  • We formulate the control of reactive power generation by photovoltaic inverters in a power distribution circuit as a constrained optimization that aims to minimize reactive power losses subject to finite inverter capacity and upper and lower voltage limits at all nodes in the circuit. When voltage variations along the circuit are small and losses of both real and reactive powers are small compared to the respective flows, the resulting optimization problem is convex. Moreover, the cost function is separable enabling a distributed, on-line implementation with node-local computations using only local measurements augmented with limited information from the neighboring nodes communicated over cyber channels. Such an approach lies between the fully centralized and local policy approaches previously considered. We explore protocols based on the dual ascent method and on the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM) and find that the ADMM protocol performs significantly better.
  • The effect of secondary structure on DNA duplex formation is poorly understood. We use a coarse-grained model of DNA to show that specific 3- and 4-base pair hairpins reduce hybridization rates by factors of 2 and 10 respectively, in good agreement with experiment. By contrast, melting rates are accelerated by factors of ~100 and ~2000. This surprisingly large speed-up occurs because hairpins form during the melting process, stabilizing partially melted states, and facilitating dissociation. These results may help guide the design of DNA devices that use hairpins to modulate hybridization and dissociation pathways and rates.
  • We present a new, nucleotide-level model for RNA, oxRNA, based on the coarse-graining methodology recently developed for the oxDNA model of DNA. The model is designed to reproduce structural, mechanical and thermodynamic properties of RNA, and the coarse-graining level aims to retain the relevant physics for RNA hybridization and the structure of single- and double-stranded RNA. In order to explore its strengths and weaknesses, we test the model in a range of nanotechnological and biological settings. Applications explored include the folding thermodynamics of a pseudoknot, the formation of a kissing loop complex, the structure of a hexagonal RNA nanoring, and the unzipping of a hairpin motif. We argue that the model can be used for efficient simulations of the structure of systems with thousands of base pairs, and for the assembly of systems of up to hundreds of base pairs. The source code implementing the model is released for public use.
  • To simulate long time and length scale processes involving DNA it is necessary to use a coarse-grained description. Here we provide an overview of different approaches to such coarse graining, focussing on those at the nucleotide level that allow the self-assembly processes associated with DNA nanotechnology to be studied. OxDNA, our recently-developed coarse-grained DNA model, is particularly suited to this task, and has opened up this field to systematic study by simulations. We illustrate some of the range of DNA nanotechnology systems to which the model is being applied, as well as the insights it can provide into fundamental biophysical properties of DNA.
  • While the thermodynamics of DNA hybridization is well understood, much less is known about the kinetics of this classic system. Filling this gap in our understanding has new urgency because DNA nanotechnology often depends critically on binding rates. Here we use a coarse-grained model to explore the hybridization kinetics of DNA oligomers, finding that strand association proceeds through a complex set of intermediate states. Successful binding events start with the formation of a few metastable base-pairing interactions, followed by zippering of the remaining bonds. However, despite reasonably strong interstrand interactions, initial contacts frequently fail to lead to zippering because the typical configurations in which they form differ from typical states of similar enthalpy in the double-stranded equilibrium ensemble. Therefore, if the association process is analyzed on the base-pair (secondary structure) level, it shows non-Markovian behavior. Initial contacts must be stabilized by two or three base pairs before full zippering is likely, resulting in negative effective activation enthalpies. Non-Arrhenius behavior is observed as the number of base pairs in the effective transition state increases with temperature. In addition, we find that alternative pathways involving misbonds can increase association rates. For repetitive sequences, misaligned duplexes frequently rearrange to form fully paired duplexes by two distinct processes which we label `pseudoknot' and `inchworm' internal displacement. We show how the above processes can explain why experimentally observed association rates of GC-rich oligomers are higher than rates of AT-rich equivalents. More generally, we argue that association rates can be modulated by sequence choice.
  • We apply a recently-developed coarse-grained model of DNA, designed to capture the basic physics of nanotechnological DNA systems, to the study of a `burnt-bridges' DNA motor consisting of a single-stranded cargo that steps processively along a track of single-stranded stators. We demonstrate that the model is able to simulate such a system, and investigate the sensitivity of the stepping process to the spatial separation of stators, finding that an increased distance can suppress successful steps due to the build up of unfavourable tension. The mechanism of suppression suggests that varying the distance between stators could be used as a method for improving signal-to-noise ratios for motors that are required to make a decision at a junction of stators.
  • We introduce a sequence-dependent parametrization for a coarse-grained DNA model [T. E. Ouldridge, A. A. Louis, and J. P. K. Doye, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 085101 (2011)] originally designed to reproduce the properties of DNA molecules with average sequences. The new parametrization introduces sequence-dependent stacking and base-pairing interaction strengths chosen to reproduce the melting temperatures of short duplexes. By developing a histogram reweighting technique, we are able to fit our parameters to the melting temperatures of thousands of sequences. To demonstrate the flexibility of the model, we study the effects of sequence on: (a) the heterogeneous stacking transition of single strands, (b) the tendency of a duplex to fray at its melting point, (c) the effects of stacking strength in the loop on the melting temperature of hairpins, (d) the force-extension properties of single strands and (e) the structure of a kissing-loop complex. Where possible we compare our results with experimental data and find a good agreement. A simulation code called oxDNA, implementing our model, is available as free software.
  • Nonlinear interaction of membrane proteins with cytoskeleton and membrane leads to non-Gaussian structure of their displacement probability distribution. We propose a novel statistical analysis technique for learning the characteristics of the nonlinear potential from the cumulants of the displacement distribution. The efficiency of the approach is demonstrated on the analysis of kurtosis of the displacement distribution of the particle traveling on a membrane in a cage-type potential. Results of numerical simulations are supported by analytical predictions. We show that the approach allows robust identification of the potential for the much lower temporal resolution compare with the mean square displacement analysis.
  • High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.
  • High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.
  • We show how distributed control of reactive power can serve to regulate voltage and minimize resistive losses in a distribution circuit that includes a significant level of photovoltaic (PV) generation. To demonstrate the technique, we consider a radial distribution circuit with a single branch consisting of sequentially-arranged residential-scale loads that consume both real and reactive power. In parallel, some loads also have PV generation capability. We postulate that the inverters associated with each PV system are also capable of limited reactive power generation or consumption, and we seek to find the optimal dispatch of each inverter's reactive power to both maintain the voltage within an acceptable range and minimize the resistive losses over the entire circuit. We assume the complex impedance of the distribution circuit links and the instantaneous load and PV generation at each load are known. We compare the results of the optimal dispatch with a suboptimal local scheme that does not require any communication. On our model distribution circuit, we illustrate the feasibility of high levels of PV penetration and a significant (20% or higher) reduction in losses.