• The Second Workshop on Extreme Precision Radial Velocities defined circa 2015 the state of the art Doppler precision and identified the critical path challenges for reaching 10 cm/s measurement precision. The presentations and discussion of key issues for instrumentation and data analysis and the workshop recommendations for achieving this precision are summarized here. Beginning with the HARPS spectrograph, technological advances for precision radial velocity measurements have focused on building extremely stable instruments. To reach still higher precision, future spectrometers will need to produce even higher fidelity spectra. This should be possible with improved environmental control, greater stability in the illumination of the spectrometer optics, better detectors, more precise wavelength calibration, and broader bandwidth spectra. Key data analysis challenges for the precision radial velocity community include distinguishing center of mass Keplerian motion from photospheric velocities, and the proper treatment of telluric contamination. Success here is coupled to the instrument design, but also requires the implementation of robust statistical and modeling techniques. Center of mass velocities produce Doppler shifts that affect every line identically, while photospheric velocities produce line profile asymmetries with wavelength and temporal dependencies that are different from Keplerian signals. Exoplanets are an important subfield of astronomy and there has been an impressive rate of discovery over the past two decades. Higher precision radial velocity measurements are required to serve as a discovery technique for potentially habitable worlds and to characterize detections from transit missions. The future of exoplanet science has very different trajectories depending on the precision that can ultimately be achieved with Doppler measurements.
  • A new apodized Keplerian (AK) model is proposed for the analysis of precision radial velocity (RV) data to model both planetary and stellar activity (SA) induced RV signals. A symmetrical Gaussian apodization function with unknown width and center can distinguish planetary signals from SA signals on the basis of the span of the apodization window. The general model for $m$ apodized Keplerian signals includes a linear regression term between RV and the stellar activity diagnostic $\log(R'hk)$, as well as an extra Gaussian noise term with unknown standard deviation. The model parameters are explored using a Bayesian fusion MCMC code. A differential version of the Generalized Lomb-Scargle periodogram that employs a control diagnostic provides an additional way of distinguishing SA signals and helps guide the choice of new periods. Results are reported for a recent international RV blind challenge which included multiple state of the art simulated data sets supported by a variety of stellar activity diagnostics. In the current implementation, the AK method achieved a reduction in SA noise by a factor of approximately 6. Final parameter estimates for the planetary candidates are derived from fits that include AK signals to model the SA components and simple Keplerians to model the planetary candidates. Preliminary results are also reported for AK models augmented by a moving average component that allows for correlations in the residuals.
  • A re-analysis of Gliese 667C HARPS precision radial velocity data was carried out with a Bayesian multi-planet Kepler periodogram (from 0 to 7 planets) based on a fusion Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. The most probable number of signals detected is 6 with a Bayesian false alarm probability of 0.012. The residuals are shown to be consistent with white noise. The 6 signals detected include two previously reported with periods of 7.198 (b) and 28.14 (c) days, plus additional periods of 30.82 (d), 38.82 (e), 53.22, and 91.3 (f) days. The 53 day signal is probably the second harmonic of the stellar rotation period and is likely the result of surface activity. The existence of the additonal Keplerian signals suggest the possibilty of further planets, two of which (d and e) could join Gl 667Cc in the central region of the habitable zone. N-body simulations are required to determine which of these signals are consistent with a stable planetary system. $M \sin i$ values corresponding to signals b, c, d, e, and f are $\sim$ 5.4, 4.8, 3.1, 2.4, and 5.4 M$_{\earth}$, respectively.
  • A re-analysis of Gliese 581 HARPS and HIRES precision radial velocity data was carried out with a Bayesian multi-planet Kepler periodogram (from 1 to 6 planets) based on a fusion Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. In all cases the analysis included an unknown parameterized stellar jitter noise term. For the HARPS data set the most probable number of planetary signals detected is 5 with a Bayesian false alarm probability of 0.01. These include the $3.1498\pm0.0005$, $5.3687\pm0.0002$, $12.927_{-0.004}^{+0.006}$, and $66.9\pm0.2$d periods reported previously plus a $399_{-16}^{+14}$d period. The orbital eccentricities are $0.0_{-0.0}^{+0.2}$, $0.00_{-0.00}^{+0.02}$, $0.10_{-0.10}^{+0.06}$, $0.33_{-0.10}^{+0.09}$, and $0.02_{-0.02}^{+0.30}$, respectively. The semi-major axis and $M sin i$ of the 5 planets are ($0.0285\pm0.0006$ au, $1.9\pm0.3$M$_{\earth}$), ($0.0406\pm0.0009$ au, $15.7\pm0.7$M$_{\earth}$), ($0.073\pm0.002$ au, $5.3\pm0.4$M$_{\earth}$), ($0.218\pm0.005$ au, $6.7\pm0.8$M$_{\earth}$), and ($0.7\pm0.2$ au, $6.6_{-2.7}^{+2.0}$M$_{\earth}$), respectively. The analysis of the HIRES data set yielded a reliable detection of only the strongest 5.37 and 12.9 day periods. The analysis of the combined HIRES/HARPS data again only reliably detected the 5.37 and 12.9d periods. Detection of 4 planetary signals with periods of 3.15, 5.37, 12.9, and 66.9d was only achieved by including an additional unknown but parameterized Gaussian error term added in quadrature to the HIRES quoted errors. The marginal distribution for the sigma of this additional error term has a well defined peak at $1.8\pm0.4$m s$^{-1}$. It is possible that this additional error arises from unidentified systematic effects. We did not find clear evidence for a fifth planetary signal in the combined HIRES/HARPS data set.
  • A Bayesian analysis of 47 Ursae Majoris (47 UMa) radial velocity data confirms and refines the properties of two previously reported planets with periods of 1079 and 2325 days and finds evidence for an additional long period planet with a period of approximately 10000 days. The three planet model is found to be 10^5 times more probable than the next most probable model which is a two planet model. The nonlinear model fitting is accomplished with a new hybrid Markov chain Monte Carlo (HMCMC) algorithm which incorporates parallel tempering, simulated annealing and genetic crossover operations. Each of these features facilitate the detection of a global minimum in chi-squared. By combining all three, the HMCMC greatly increases the probability of realizing this goal. When applied to the Kepler problem it acts as a powerful multi-planet Kepler periodogram. The measured periods are 1078 \pm 2, 2391{+100}{-87}, and 14002{+4018}{-5095}d, and the corresponding eccentricities are 0.032 \pm 0.014, 0.098{+.047}{-.096}, and 0.16{+.09}{-.16}. The results favor low eccentricity orbits for all three. Assuming the three signals (each one consistent with a Keplerian orbit) are caused by planets, the corresponding limits on planetary mass (M sin i) and semi-major axis are (2.53{+.07}{-.06}MJ, 2.10\pm0.02au), (0.54\pm0.07MJ, 3.6\pm0.1au), and (1.6{+0.3}{-0.5}MJ, 11.6{+2.1}{-2.9}au), respectively. We have also characterized a noise induced eccentricity bias and designed a correction filter that can be used as an alternate prior for eccentricity, to enhance the detection of planetary orbits of low or moderate eccentricity.