• Recent AC susceptibility and polar Kerr effect measurements in the skutterudite superconductor PrOs4Sb12 (POS) uncovered the nature of the superconducting double transition from a high temperature, high field, time reversal symmetric phase (or the A phase) to a low temperature, low field, time reversal symmetry broken phase (or the B phase). Starting from a microscopic model, we derive a Ginzburg-Landau expansion relevant to POS that describes this entrance into the time reversal symmetry broken phase along the temperature axis. We also provide a study of the low energy inelastic (Raman) response in both the A and B phases of POS, and seek additional signatures which could help reveal the exact form of the gap functions previously proposed in these phases. By appropriately manipulating the incoming and scattered light geometries, along with additional subtraction procedures and suitable assumptions, we show that one can access the various irreducible representations contained in the point group describing POS. We demonstrate how to use this technique on example order parameters proposed in POS. Depending on whether there exist nodes along the c-axis, we find additional low energy spectral weight within the superconducting gap in the Eg geometry, a feature that could pin point the location of nodes on the Fermi surface.
  • We investigate the validity of Luttinger's theorem (or Luttinger sum rule) in two scale-invariant fermionic models. We find that, in general, Luttinger's theorem does not hold in a system of fermions with power-law Green functions which do not necessarily preserve particle-hole symmetry. However, Ref. \cite{Blagoev1997,Yamanaka1997} showed that Luttinger liquids, another scale-invariant fermionic model, respect Luttinger's theorem. To understand the difference, we examine the spinless Luttinger liquid model. We find two properties which make the Luttinger sum rule valid in this model: particle-hole symmetry and $\mathrm{Im} G(\omega=0,-\infty)=0$. We conjecture that these two properties represent sufficient, but not necessary, conditions for the validity of the Luttinger sum rule in condensed matter systems.
  • We study an anisotropic holographic bottom-up model displaying a quantum phase transition (QPT) between a topologically trivial insulator and a non-trivial Weyl semimetal phase. We analyze the properties of quantum chaos in the quantum critical region. We find a violation of the recently conjectured bound for the butterfly velocity across a QPT. In particular, the butterfly velocity along the anisotropic direction does not display a maximum at the quantum critical point. We observe that instead of the butterfly velocity, it is the dimensionless information screening length that is always maximized at a quantum critical point. We argue that the null-energy condition (NEC) is the underlying reason for the upper bound, which now is just a simple combination of the number of spatial dimensions and the anisotropic scaling parameter.
  • We propose a theoretical framework for the detection of order parameter fluctuations in three dimensions using ultrafast coherent phonon spectroscopy. We focus our attention on long wavelength charge density fluctuations (plasmons), and charged nematic fluctuations where the direction of the propagation vector is fixed perpendicular to the plane of anisotropy. By treating phonons and light classically and decoupling interactions to integrate out the fermionic degrees of freedom, we arrive at an effective theory of order parameter fluctuations about the spatially uniform saddle-point solution. We find that, due to the $(k_x^2-k_y^2) (B_{1g})$ symmetry of the form factor appearing in the vertex, nematic fluctuations couple to light only at fourth order, unlike isotropic density fluctuations which couple at second order. Hence, to lowest order, the interaction between electrons and the electromagnetic field contributes a driving force for plasmon oscillations while it provides a frequency shift for nematic fluctuations. From the resulting coupled harmonic oscillator equations of motion, we argue that ultrafast coherent phonon spectroscopy could be a useful tool to extract and analyze various electronic properties of interest such as the frequency of the collective mode and the coupling between electrons and phonons. Specific experiments are proposed on the normal state of FeSe to observe the frequency shift predicted here resulting directly from orbital ordering (nematic) fluctuations.
  • Recent photoemission spectroscopy measurements (T. J. Reber et al., arXiv:1509.01611) of cuprate superconductors have inferred that the self-energy exhibits critical scaling over an extended doping regime, thereby calling into question the conventional wisdom that critical scaling exists only at isolated points. In paticular, this new state of matter, dubbed a power-law liquid, has a self-energy whose imaginary part scales as $\Sigma^{\prime\prime}\sim(\omega^{2}+\pi^{2}T^{2})^{\alpha}$, with $\alpha=1$ in the overdoped Fermi-liquid state and $\alpha\leq0.5$ in the optimal to underdoped regime. Taking this as a given, we first reconstruct the real part of the self-energy. We find that the resultant quasiparticle weight vanishes for any doping level less than optimal, implying an absence of particle-like excitations in the underdoped regime. Consequently, the Fermi velocity vanishes and the effective mass diverges for $\alpha\leq\frac{1}{2}$, in agreement with earlier experimental observations. We then use the self-energy to reconstruct the spectral function and compute the superconducting $T_c$ within the BCS formalism. We find that the $T_c$ has a dome-like structure, implying that broad scale invariance manifested in the form of a power-law liquid is the likely cause of the superconducting dome in the cuprates.
  • Twisted bilayer graphene (TBG) exhibits dispersionless bands at a particular set of twist values called magic angles. This dispersionless behavior can be understood from an effective description of the bilayer system in terms of a triangular superlattice formed by the so called Moir\'e patterns. The kinetic energy of the quasi-free electrons in this superlattice is heavily quenched, causing the interactions to dominate, and thus rendering TBG a playground of strong correlation physics. Although it has been argued [1-5] that the novel insulating state arising from such twist angles is of the Mott-type, we show here that the the insulating state in the vicinity of the magic angles is actually a Wigner crystal. The Mott state obtains at a density four orders of magnitude larger that in the experimental systems, thereby rendering it irrelevant to the physics of TBG near the magic angles. Superconductivity then arises from melting (doping) a Wigner crystal which has been argued previously [6] to exhibit superconducting correlations. Defect-mediated melting in a Wigner crystal should exhibit strong Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless behaviour and hence should serve as a guide to the experiments.
  • We address the question of the mismatch between the zero momentum limits of the transverse and longitudinal dielectric functions for a fixed direction of the driving field observed in the cuprates. This question translates to whether or not the order in which the longitudinal and transverse momentum transfers are taken to zero commute. While the two limits commute for both isotropic and anisotropic Drude metals, we argue that a scaleless vertex interaction that depends solely on the angle between scattered electron momenta is sufficient to achieve non-commutativity of the two limits even for a system that is inherently isotropic. We demonstrate this claim for a simple case of the Drude conductivity modified by electron-boson interactions through appropriate vertex corrections, and outline possible consequences of our result to optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) measurements close to zero momentum transfer
  • We study fermions in an electrically-probed and asymptotically anti-de Sitter Schwarzschild spacetime which interact via novel chiral symmetry-preserving interactions. Computing the dual fermion two-point correlator, we show that these bulk interactions anisotropically gap Fermi surfaces of the boundary spectrum. Consequently, the interactions we devise provide holographic models for Fermi arcs seen ubiquitously in the pseudogap regime of the cuprates. Our interactions are modifications of the chiral symmetry-breaking Pauli coupling, which has previously been proposed as the holographic realization of Mott physics. The onset of Mott insulation and pseudogap physics are respectively discussed in the context of bulk chiral and boundary parity symmetry breaking, and the Mott transition is interpreted as a deconfinement transition of non-Fermi liquid excitations.
  • We study a single-channel Kondo effect using a recently developed holographic large-$N$ technique. In order to obtain resistivity of this model, we introduce a probe field. The gravity dual of a localized fermionic impurity in 1+1-dimensional host matter is constructed by embedding a localized 2-dimensional Anti-de Sitter (\ads{2})-brane in the bulk of \ads{3}. This helps us construct an impurity charge density which acts as a source to the bulk equation of motion of the probe gauge field. The functional form of the charge density is obtained independently by solving the equations of motion for the fields confined to the \ads{2}-brane. The asymptotic solution of the probe field is dictated by the impurity charge density, which in turn, affects the current-current correlation functions, and hence the resistivity. Our choice of parameters tunes the near-boundary impurity current to be marginal, resulting in a $\log T$ behavior in the UV resistivity, as is expected for the Kondo problem. The resistivity at the IR fixed point turns out to be zero, signaling a complete screening of the impurity.
  • Destruction of superconductivity in thin films was thought to be a simple instance of Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless physics in which only two phases exist: a superconductor with algebraic long range order in which the vortices condense and an insulator where the vortex-antivortex pairs proliferate. However, since 1989 this view has been challenged as now a preponderance of experiments indicate that an intervening bosonic metallic state obtains upon the destruction of superconductivity. We review here a glassy model which is capable of capturing both of these features. The finite resistance arises from three features. First, the disordered insulator-superconductor transition in the absence of fermionic degrees of freedom (Cooper pairs only), is controlled by a diffusive fixed point\cite{CN} rather than the critical point of the clean system. Hence, the relevant physics that generates the Bose metal should arise from a term in the action in which different replicas are mixed. We show explicitly how such physics arises in the phase glass. Second, in 2D (not in 3D) the phase stiffness of the glass phase vanishes explicitly as has been shown in extensive numerical simulations\cite{ky,kosterlitz1,kosterlitz2}. Third, bosons moving in such a glassy environment fail to localize as a result of the false minima in the landscape. We calculate the conductivity explicitly using Kubo response and show that it turns on as a power law and has a vanishing Hall response as a result of underlying particle-hole symmetry. We show that when particle-hole symmetry is broken, the Hall conductance turns on with the same power law as does the longitudinal conductance.
  • We demonstrate quite generally how a conserved current can have an anomalous dimension. We show here that if the current in the normal state of the cuprates has an anomalous dimension, then the Aharonov-Bohm flux through a ring does not have the standard $eBA/\hbar$ form, where $A$ is the area and $B$ the external magnetic field, but instead is modified by a geometrical factor that depends directly on the anomalous dimension of the current. We calculate the signal in square and disk geometries. In both cases, the deviation from the standard result is striking and offers a fingerprint about what precisely is strange about the strange metal.
  • Motivated in part by the numerical simulations [ky,kosterlitz1,kosterlitz2] which reveal that the energy to create a defect in a gauge or phase glass scales as $L^{\theta}$ with $\theta<0$ for 2D, thereby implying a vanishing stiffness, we re-examine the relevance of these kinds of models to the Bose metal in light of the new experiments [kapsym,armitage] which reveal that the Hall conductance is zero in the metallic state that disrupts the transition from the superconductor to the insulator in 2D samples. Because of the particle-hole symmetry in the phase glass model, we find that bosonic excitations in a phase glass background generate no Hall conductance at the Gaussian level. Furthermore, this result persists to any order in perturbation theory in the interactions. We show that when particle-hole symmetry is broken, the Hall conductance turns on with the same power law as does the longitudinal conductance. This prediction can be verified experimentally by applying a ground plane to the 2D samples.
  • Recent photoemission spectroscopy measurements [arXiv:1509.01611] on cuprate superconductors have inferred that over a wide range of doping, the imaginary part of the electron self-energy scales as $\Sigma^{\prime\prime}\sim(\omega^2+\pi^2T^2)^a$ with $a=1$ in the overdoped Fermi-liquid state and $a<0.5$ in the optimal to underdoped regime. We show that this non-Fermi-liquid scaling behavior can naturally be explained by the presence of a scale-invariant state of matter known as unparticles. We evaluate analytically the electron self-energy due to interactions with fermionic unparticles. We find that, in agreement with experiments, the imaginary part of the self-energy scales with respect to temperature and energy as $\Sigma^{\prime\prime}\sim T^{2+2\alpha}$ and $\omega^{2+2\alpha}$, where $\alpha$ is the anomalous dimension of the unparticle propagator. In addition, the calculated occupancy and susceptibility of fermionic unparticles, unlike those of normal fermions, have significant spectral weights even at high energies. This unconventional behavior is attributed to the branch cut in the unparticle propagator which broadens the unparticle spectral function over a wide energy range and non-trivially alters the scattering phase space by enhancing (suppressing) the intrinsic susceptibility at low energies for negative (positive) $\alpha$. Our work presents new evidence suggesting that unparticles might be important low-energy degrees of freedom in strongly coupled systems such as the cuprate superconductors.
  • We study impurity scattering in the normal and d-wave superconducting states of line nodal semimetals and show that, due to additional scattering phase space available for impurities on the surface, the quasiparticle interference pattern acquires an extended character instead of a discrete collection of delta function peaks. Moreover, using the T-matrix formalism, we demonstrate that the conventional behavior of a scalar impurity in a d-wave superconductor breaks down on the surface of a line nodal semimetal in the quasi flat band limit.
  • We show explicitly that the full structure of IIB string theory is needed to remove the non-localities that arise in boundary conformal theories that border hyperbolic spaces on AdS$_5$. Specifically, using the Caffarelli/Silvestri\cite{caffarelli}, Graham/Zworski\cite{graham}, and Chang/Gonzalez\cite{chang:2010} extension theorems, we prove that the boundary operator conjugate to bulk p-forms with negative mass in geodesically complete metrics is inherently a non-local operator, specifically the fractional conformal Laplacian. The non-locality, which arises even in compact spaces, applies to any degree p-form such as a gauge field. We show that the boundary theory contains fractional derivatives of the longitudinal components of the gauge field if the gauge field in the bulk along the holographic direction acquires a mass via the Higgs mechanism. The non-locality is shown to vanish once the metric becomes incomplete, for example, either 1) asymptotically by adding N transversely stacked Dd-branes or 2) exactly by giving the boundary a brane structure and including a single transverse Dd-brane in the bulk. The original Maldacena conjecture within IIB string theory corresponds to the former. In either of these proposals, the location of the Dd-branes places an upper bound on the entanglement entropy because the minimal bulk surface in the AdS reduction is ill-defined at a brane interface. Since the brane singularities can be circumvented in the full 10-dimensional spacetime, we conjecture that the true entanglement entropy must be computed from the minimal surface in 10-dimensions, which is of course not minimal in the AdS$_5$ reduction.
  • Motivated by the normal state of the cuprates in which the f-sum rule increases faster than a linear function of the particle density, we derive a conductivity sum rule for a system in which the kinetic energy operator in the Hamiltonian is a general function of the momentum squared. Such a kinetic energy arises in scale invariant theories and can be derived within the context of holography. Our derivation of the f-sum rule is based on the gauge couplings of a non-local Lagrangian in which the kinetic operator is a fractional Laplacian of order $\alpha$. We find that the f-sum rule in this case deviates from the standard linear dependence on the particle density. We find two regimes. At high temperatures and low densities, the sum rule is proportional to $nT^{\frac{\alpha-1}{\alpha}}$ where $T$ is the temperature. At low temperatures and high densities, the sum rule is proportional to $n^{1+\frac{2(\alpha-1)}{d}}$ with $d$ being the number of spatial dimensions. The result in the low temperature and high density limit, when $\alpha < 1$, can be used to qualitatively explain the behavior of the effective number of charge carriers in the cuprates at various doping concentrations.
  • Recent neutron scattering observations by Plumb et al. [1] reveal that the ground state of $FeSc_2S_4$ is magnetic with two distinct Fe environments, instead of a quantum spin liquid as had been previously thought. Starting with the relevant O(N)-symmetric vector model of $FeSc_2S_4$, we study how the discrete ($Z_2$) and continuous rotational symmetries are successively broken, yielding nematic and ordered phases. At high temperatures, we find that the nematic order parameter falls as $T^{-\gamma}$ ($\gamma>0$), and therefore, $FeSc_2S_4$ lacks any distinct nematic ordering temperature. This feature indicates that the three-dimensional diamond lattice of $FeSc_2S_4$ is highly susceptible to the breaking of Ising symmetries, and explains the two distinct Fe environments that is present even at high temperatures, as seen by M\"ossbauer and far infrared optical spectroscopy.
  • Recent photoemission experiments \cite{dessau} reveal that the excitations along the nodal region in the strange metal of the cuprates, rather than corresponding to poles in the single-particle Green function, exhibit power-law scaling as a function of frequency and temperature. Because such power-law scaling is indicative of a scale-invariant sector, as a first step, we perturbatively evaluate the electron self-energy due to interactions with scale-invariant unparticles. We focus on a $G_0W$ type diagram with an interaction $W$ mediated by a bosonic scalar unparticle. We find that, in the high-temperature limit, the imaginary part of the self-energy $\mathrm{Im}\Sigma$ is linear in temperature. In the low-temperature limit, $\mathrm{Im}\Sigma$ exhibits the same power law in both temperature and frequency, with an exponent that depends on the scaling dimension of an unparticle operator. Such behavior is qualitatively consistent with the experimental observations. We then expand the unparticle propagator into coherent and incoherent contributions, and study how the incoherent part violates the density of states (DOS) and density-density correlation function sum rules (f-sum rule). Such violations can, in principle, be observed experimentally. Our work indicates that the physical mechanism for the origin of the power-law scaling is the incoherent background, which is generated from the Mott-scale physics.
  • I analyze the recent observation of a Bose metal in NbSe$_2$ and place these results in the wider context of the first sighting of such a phase in amorphous Bi and MoGe thin films.
  • Partial nesting between two connected or disconnected regions of the Fermi surface leads to fractional powers of the Coulomb scattering lifetime as a function of temperature and frequency. This result is first demonstrated for a toy band structure where partial nesting occurs within a single band and between different regions of the Brillouin zone. A comparison is then made to a multiband scenario by studying the scattering rate of an effective two orbital model that was proposed in the context of multi-orbital superconductors. In the process, various model independent factors affecting the temperature exponent, n, are identified. The logarithmically divergent contributions of the lowest order vertex correction to the multi-orbital susceptibility, and the role played by nesting in suppressing these divergences is analyzed. The relevance of these results is discussed keeping the recently observed anomalous resistivity in the Co doped Iron superconductor LiFeAs as a backdrop.
  • Motivated by the overwhelming evidence some type of quantum criticality underlies the power-law for the optical conductivity and $T-$linear resistivity in the cuprates, we demonstrate here how a scale-invariant or unparticle sector can lead to a unifying description of the observed scaling forms. We adopt the continuous mass formalism or multi band (flavor) formalism of the unparticle sector by letting various microscopic parameters be mass-dependent. In particular, we show that an effective mass that varies with the flavor index as well as a running band edge and lifetime capture the AC and DC transport phenomenology of the cuprates. A key consequence of the running mass is that the effective dynamical exponent can differ from the underlying bare critical exponent, thereby providing a mechanism for realizing the fractional values of the dynamical exponent required in a previous analysis\cite{ Hartnoll:2015sea}. We also predict that regardless of the bare dynamical exponent, $z$, a non-zero anomalous dimension for the current is required. Physically, the anomalous dimension arises because the charge depends on the flavor, mass or energy. The equivalent phenomenon in a $d+1$ gravitational construction is the running of the charge along the radial direction. The nature of the superconducting instability in the presence of scale invariant stuff shows that the transition temperature is not necessarily a monotonic function of the pairing interaction.
  • We show explicitly how a strongly coupled fixed point can be constructed in scalar $g\varphi^4$ theory from the solutions to a non-linear eigenvalue problem. The fixed point exists only for $d< 4$, is unstable and characterized by $\nu=2/d$ (correlation length exponent), $\eta=1/2-d/8$ (anomalous dimension). For $d=2$, these exponents reproduce to those of the Ising model which can be understood from the codimension of the critical point. At this fixed point, $\varphi^{2i}$ terms with $i>2$ are all irrelevant. The testable prediction of this fixed point is that the specific heat exponent vanishes. 2d critical Mott systems are well described by this new fixed point.
  • We compute conductivities of strongly-interacting and non-uniform charge densities dual to inhomogeneous anti-de Sitter--black hole spacetimes. Backreacting bulk scalars with periodic boundary profiles, we construct generalizations of Reissner-Nordstr\"om-AdS that interpolate between those used in two previous studies --- one that reports power-law scaling for the boundary optical conductivity and one that does not. We find no evidence for power-law scaling of the conductivity, thereby corroborating the previous negative result that gravitational crystals are insufficient to generate the power-law mid-infrared conductivity observed in cuprate superconductors.
  • I am concerned in these lectures with the breakdown of the particle concept in strongly correlated electron matter. I first show that the standard procedure for counting particles, namely Luttinger's theorem, breaks down anytime pole-like excitations are replaced by ones that have a divergent self-energy. Such a breakdown obtains in electronic systems whose pole-like excitations do not extend to the edge of the Brillouin zone, as in Fermi arcs in the cuprates. Since any non-trivial infrared dynamics in strongly correlated electron matter must be controlled by a critical fixed point, unparticles are the natural candidate to explain the presence of charged degrees of freedom that have no particle content. The continuous mass formulation of unparticles is recast as an action in anti de Sitter space. Such an action serves as the generating functional for the propagator. This mapping fixes the scaling dimension of the unparticle to be $d_U=d/2+\sqrt{d^2+4}/2$ and ensures that the corresponding propagator has zeros with $d$ the spacetime dimension of the unparticle field. The general {\it dynamical} mechanism by which bulk operators, such as the Pauli term, couple to the scaling dimension of the boundary operator and thereby lead to a vanishing of the spectral weight at zero energy is reviewed in the context of unparticles and zeros. The analogue of the BCS gap equations with unparticles indicates that the transition temperature increases as the attractive interaction strength decreases, indicating that unparticles are highly susceptible to a superconducting instability.
  • We develop a microscopic theory for the point-contact conductance between a metalic electrode and a strongly correlated material using the non-equilibrium Schwinger-Kadanoff-Baym-Keldysh formalism. We explicitly show that in the classical limit, contact size shorter than the scattering length of the system, the microscopic model can be reduced to an effective model with transfer matrix elements that conserve in-plane momentum. We find that the conductance $dI/dV$ is proportional to the {\it effective density of states}, that is, the integrated single-particle spectral function $A(\omega=eV)$ over the whole Brillouin zone. From this conclusion, we are able to establish the conditions under which a non-Fermi liquid metal exhibits a zero-bias peak in the conductance. This finding is discussed in the context of recent point-contact spectroscopy on the iron pnictides and chalcogenides which has exhibited a zero-bias conductance peak.