• Frequency analysis of the rf emission of oscillating Josephson supercurrent is a powerful passive way of probing properties of topological Josephson junctions. In particular, measurements of the Josephson emission enables to detect the expected presence of topological gapless Andreev bound states that give rise to emission at half the Josephson frequency $f_J$, rather than conventional emission at $f_J$. Here we report direct measurement of rf emission spectra on Josephson junctions made of HgTe-based gate-tunable topological weak links. The emission spectra exhibit a clear signal at half the Josephson frequency $f_{\rm J}/2$. The linewidths of emission lines indicate a coherence time of $0.3-\SI{4}{ns}$ for the $f_{\rm J}/2$ line, much shorter than for the $f_{\rm J}$ line ($3-\SI{4}{ns}$). These observations strongly point towards the presence of topological gapless Andreev bound states, and pave the way for a future HgTe-based platform for topological quantum computation.
  • The HgTe quantum well (QW) is a well-characterized two-dimensional topological insulator (2D-TI). Its band gap is relatively small (typically on the order of 10 meV), which restricts the observation of purely topological conductance to low temperatures. Here, we utilize the strain-dependence of the band structure of HgTe QWs to address this limitation. We use $\text{CdTe}-\text{Cd}_{0.5}\text{Zn}_{0.5}\text{Te}$ strained-layer superlattices on GaAs as virtual substrates with adjustable lattice constant to control the strain of the QW. We present magneto-transport measurements, which demonstrate a transition from a semi- metallic to a 2D-TI regime in wide QWs, when the strain is changed from tensile to compressive. Most notably, we demonstrate a much enhanced energy gap of 55 meV in heavily compressively strained QWs. This value exceeds the highest possible gap on common II-VI substrates by a factor of 2-3, and extends the regime where the topological conductance prevails to much higher temperatures.
  • In recent years, Majorana physics has attracted considerable attention in both theoretical and experimental studies due to exotic new phenomena and its prospects for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. To this end, one needs to engineer the interplay between superconductivity and electronic properties in a topological insulator, but experimental work remains scarce and ambiguous. Here we report experimental evidence for topological superconductivity induced in a HgTe quantum well, a two-dimensional topological insulator that exhibits the quantum spin Hall effect. The ac Josephson effect demonstrates that the supercurrent has a $4\pi$-periodicity with the superconducting phase difference as indicated by a doubling of the voltage step for multiple Shapiro steps. In addition, an anomalous SQUID-like response to a perpendicular magnetic field shows that this $4\pi$-periodic supercurrent originates from states located on the edges of the junction. Both features appear strongest when the sample is gated towards the quantum spin Hall regime, thus providing evidence for induced topological superconductivity in the quantum spin Hall edge states.
  • Conventional $s$-wave superconductivity is understood to arise from singlet pairing of electrons with opposite Fermi momenta, forming Cooper pairs whose net momentum is zero [1]. Several recent studies have focused on structures where such conventional $s$-wave superconductors are coupled to systems with an unusual configuration of electronic spin and momentum at the Fermi surface. Under these conditions, the nature of the paired state can be modified and the system may even undergo a topological phase transition [2, 3]. Here we present measurements and theoretical calculations of several HgTe quantum wells coupled to either aluminum or niobium superconductors and subject to a magnetic field in the plane of the quantum well. By studying the oscillatory response of Josephson interference to the magnitude of the in-plane magnetic field, we find that the induced pairing within the quantum well is spatially varying. Cooper pairs acquire a tunable momentum that grows with magnetic field strength, directly reflecting the response of the spin-dependent Fermi surfaces to the in-plane magnetic field. In addition, in the regime of high electron density, nodes in the induced superconductivity evolve with the electron density in agreement with our model based on the Hamiltonian of Bernevig, Hughes, and Zhang [4]. This agreement allows us to quantitatively extract the value of $\tilde{g}/v_{F}$, where $\tilde{g}$ is the effective g-factor and $v_{F}$ is the Fermi velocity. However, at low density our measurements do not agree with our model in detail. Our new understanding of the interplay between spin physics and superconductivity introduces a way to spatially engineer the order parameter, as well as a general framework within which to investigate electronic spin texture at the Fermi surface of materials.
  • The realization of quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect in HgTe quantum wells (QWs) is considered a milestone in the discovery of topological insulators. The QSH edge states are predicted to allow current to flow at the edges of an insulating bulk, as demonstrated in various experiments. A key prediction of QSH theory that remains to be experimentally verified is the breakdown of the edge conduction under broken time reversal symmetry (TRS). Here we first establish a rigorous framework for understanding the magnetic field dependence of electrostatically gated QSH devices. We then report unexpected edge conduction under broken TRS, using a unique cryogenic microwave impedance microscopy (MIM), on a 7.5 nm HgTe QW device with an inverted band structure. At zero magnetic field and low carrier densities, clear edge conduction is observed in the local conductivity profile of this device but not in the 5.5 nm control device whose band structure is trivial. Surprisingly, the edge conduction in the 7.5 nm device persists up to 9 T with little effect from the magnetic field. This indicates physics beyond simple QSH models, possibly associated with material- specific properties, other symmetry protection and/or electron-electron interactions.
  • We report on a temperature-induced transition from a conventional semiconductor to a two-dimensional topological insulator investigated by means of magnetotransport experiments on HgTe/CdTe quantum well structures. At low temperatures, we are in the regime of the quantum spin Hall effect and observe an ambipolar quantized Hall resistance by tuning the Fermi energy through the bulk band gap. At room temperature, we find electron and hole conduction that can be described by a classical two-carrier model. Above the onset of quantized magnetotransport at low temperature, we observe a pronounced linear magnetoresistance that develops from a classical quadratic low-field magnetoresistance if electrons and holes coexist. Temperature-dependent bulk band structure calculations predict a transition from a conventional semiconductor to a topological insulator in the regime where the linear magnetoresistance occurs.
  • Topological insulators are a newly discovered phase of matter characterized by a gapped bulk surrounded by novel conducting boundary states. Since their theoretical discovery, these materials have encouraged intense efforts to study their properties and capabilities. Among the most striking results of this activity are proposals to engineer a new variety of superconductor at the surfaces of topological insulators. These topological superconductors would be capable of supporting localized Majorana fermions, particles whose braiding properties have been proposed as the basis of a fault-tolerant quantum computer. Despite the clear theoretical motivation, a conclusive realization of topological superconductivity remains an outstanding experimental goal. Here we present measurements of superconductivity induced in two-dimensional HgTe/HgCdTe quantum wells, a material which becomes a quantum spin Hall insulator when the well width exceeds d_{C}=6.3 nm. In wells that are 7.5 nm wide, we find that supercurrents are confined to the one-dimensional sample edges as the bulk density is depleted. However, when the well width is decreased to 4.5 nm the edge supercurrents cannot be distinguished from those in the bulk. These results provide evidence for superconductivity induced in the helical edges of the quantum spin Hall effect, a promising step toward the demonstration of one-dimensional topological superconductivity. Our results also provide a direct measurement of the widths of these edge channels, which range from 180 nm to 408 nm.
  • The quantum spin Hall (QSH) state is a genuinely new state of matter characterized by a non-trivial topology of its band structure. Its key feature is conducting edge channels whose spin polarization has potential for spintronic and quantum information applications. The QSH state was predicted and experimentally demonstrated to exist in HgTe quantum wells. The existence of the edge channels has been inferred from the fact that local and non-local conductance values in sufficiently small devices are close to the quantized values expected for ideal edge channels and from signatures of the spin polarization. The robustness of the edge channels in larger devices and the interplay between the edge channels and a conducting bulk are relatively unexplored experimentally, and are difficult to assess via transport measurements. Here we image the current in large Hallbars made from HgTe quantum wells by probing the magnetic field generated by the current using a scanning superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). We observe that the current flows along the edge of the device in the QSH regime, and furthermore that an identifiable edge channel exists even in the presence of disorder and considerable bulk conduction as the device is gated or its temperature is raised. Our results represent a versatile method for the characterization of new quantum spin Hall materials systems, and confirm both the existence and the robustness of the predicted edge channels.
  • The discovery of the Quantum Spin Hall state, and topological insulators in general, has sparked strong experimental efforts. Transport studies of the Quantum Spin Hall state confirmed the presence of edge states, showed ballistic edge transport in micron-sized samples and demonstrated the spin polarization of the helical edge states. While these experiments have confirmed the broad theoretical model, the properties of the QSH edge states have not yet been investigated on a local scale. Using Scanning Gate Microscopy to perturb the QSH edge states on a sub-micron scale, we identify well-localized scattering sites which likely limit the expected non-dissipative transport in the helical edge channels. In the micron-sized regions between the scattering sites, the edge states appear to propagate unperturbed as expected for an ideal QSH system and are found to be robust against weak induced potential fluctuations.