• We study the gravitational lensing by a Kerr-Sen Black Hole arising in heterotic string theory. A closed form expression for the bending angle of light in equatorial plane of Kerr-Sen Black Hole is derived as a function of impact parameter, spin and charge of the Black Hole. Results obtained are also compared with the corresponding cases of Kerr Black Hole in general relativity. It is observed that charge parameter behaves qualitatively similar as the spin parameter for photons travelling in direct orbits while behaves differently for photons in retrograde orbits around Black Hole. As the numerical value of the Black Hole charge increases, bending angle becomes larger in strong field limit. Further it is observed that this effect is more pronounced in case of direct orbits in comparison to the retro orbits. For both the direct and retro motion, the bending angle exceeds 2\pi, which in turn results in multiple loops and formation of relativistic images.
  • We propose a Doppler tracking system for gravitational wave detection via Double Optical Clocks in Space (DOCS). In this configuration two spacecrafts (each containing an optical clock) are launched to space for Doppler shift observations. Compared to the similar attempt of gravitational wave detection in the Cassini mission, the radio signal of DOCS that contains the relative frequency changes avoids completely noise effects due for instance to troposphere, ionosphere, ground-based antenna and transponder. Given the high stabilities of the two optical clocks (Allan deviation $\sim 4.1\times 10^{-17}$ @ 1000 s), an overall estimated sensitivity of $5 \times 10^{-19}$ could be achieved with an observation time of 2 years, and would allow to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range from $\sim 10^{-4}$ Hz to $\sim 10^{-2}$ Hz.
  • We build two families of inspiral waveforms for precessing binaries on eccentric orbits in the Fourier domain. To achieve this, we use a small eccentricity expansion of the waveform amplitudes in order to separate the periastron precession timescale from the orbital timescale, and use a SUA transformation to compute the Fourier transform in the presence of spin-induced precession. We show that the resulting waveforms can yield a median faithfulness above 0.992 when compared to an equivalent time domain waveform with an initial eccentricity of $e_0 \approx 0.3$. We also show that when spins are large or the accumulated number of cycles is large, using a circular waveform can potentially lead to significant biases in the recovery of the parameters, even when the system has fully circularized. This is an effect of the residual eccentricity present when the objects forming the binary have non-vanishing spin components in the orbital plane.
  • We provide an elegant way of solving analytically the third post-Newtonian (3PN) accurate Kepler equation, associated with the 3PN-accurate generalized quasi-Keplerian parametrization for compact binaries in eccentric orbits. An additional analytic solution is presented to check the correctness of our compact solution and we perform comparisons between our PN-accurate analytic solution and a very accurate numerical solution of the PN-accurate Kepler equation. We adapt our approach to compute crucial 3PN-accurate inputs that will be required to compute analytically both the time and frequency domain ready-to-use amplitude-corrected PN-accurate search templates for compact binaries in inspiralling eccentric orbits.
  • Satellite tracking involves sending electromagnetic signals to Earth. Both the orbit of the spacecraft and the electromagnetic signals themselves are affected by the curvature of spacetime. The arrival time of the pulses is compared to the ticks of local clocks to reconstruct the orbital path of the satellite to high accuracy, and to implicitly measure general relativistic effects. In particular, Schwarzschild space curvature (static) and frame-dragging (stationary) due to the planet's spin affect the satellite's orbit. The dominant relativistic effect on the path of the signal photons is Shapiro delay due to static space curvature. We compute these effects for some current and proposed space missions, using a Hamiltonian formulation in four dimensions. For highly eccentric orbits, such as in the Juno mission and in the Cassini Grand Finale, the relativistic effects have a kick-like nature, which could be advantageous for detecting them if their signatures are properly modeled as functions of time. Frame-dragging appears, in principle, measurable by Juno and Cassini, though not by Galileo 5 and 6. Practical measurement would require disentangling frame-dragging from the Newtonian 'foreground' such as the gravitational quadrupole which has an impact on both the spacecraft's orbit and the signal propagation. The foreground problem remains to be solved.
  • Following the selection of The Gravitational Universe by ESA, and the successful flight of LISA Pathfinder, the LISA Consortium now proposes a 4 year mission in response to ESA's call for missions for L3. The observatory will be based on three arms with six active laser links, between three identical spacecraft in a triangular formation separated by 2.5 million km. LISA is an all-sky monitor and will offer a wide view of a dynamic cosmos using Gravitational Waves as new and unique messengers to unveil The Gravitational Universe. It provides the closest ever view of the infant Universe at TeV energy scales, has known sources in the form of verification binaries in the Milky Way, and can probe the entire Universe, from its smallest scales near the horizons of black holes, all the way to cosmological scales. The LISA mission will scan the entire sky as it follows behind the Earth in its orbit, obtaining both polarisations of the Gravitational Waves simultaneously, and will measure source parameters with astrophysically relevant sensitivity in a band from below $10^{-4}\,$Hz to above $10^{-1}\,$Hz.
  • Many studies have been carried out in the literature to evaluate the number of polarization modes of gravitational waves in modified theories, in particular in $f(R)$ theories. In the latter ones, besides the usual two transverse-traceless tensor modes present in general relativity, there are two additional scalar ones: a massive longitudinal mode and a massless transverse mode (the so-called breathing mode). This last mode has often been overlooked in the literature, due to the assumption that the application of the Lorenz gauge implies transverse-traceless wave solutions. We however show that this is in general not possible and, in particular, that the traceless condition cannot be imposed due to the fact that we no longer have a Minkowski background metric. Our findings are in agreement with the results found using the Newman-Penrose formalism, and thus clarify the inconsistencies found so far in the literature.
  • Modern optical atomic clocks along with the optical fiber technology currently being developed can measure the geoid, which is the equipotential surface that extends the mean sea level on continents, to a precision that competes with existing technology. In this proceeding, we point out that atomic clocks have the potential to not only map the sea level surface on continents, but also look at variations of the geoid as a function of time with unprecedented timing resolution. The local time series of the geoid has a plethora of applications. These include potential improvement in the predictions of earthquakes and volcanoes, and closer monitoring of ground uplift in areas where hydraulic fracturing is performed.
  • Atomic clock technology is advancing rapidly, now reaching stabilities of $\Delta f/f \sim 10^{-18}$, which corresponds to resolving $1$ cm in equivalent geoid height over an integration timescale of about 7 hours. At this level of performance, ground-based atomic clock networks emerge as a tool for monitoring a variety of geophysical processes by directly measuring changes in the gravitational potential. Vertical changes of the clock's position due to magmatic, volcanic, post-seismic or tidal deformations can result in measurable variations in the clock tick rate. As an example, we discuss the geopotential change arising due to an inflating point source (Mogi model), and apply it to the Etna volcano. Its effect on an observer on the Earth's surface can be divided into two different terms: one purely due to uplift and one due to the redistribution of matter. Thus, with the centimetre-level precision of current clocks it is already possible to monitor volcanoes. The matter redistribution term is estimated to be 2-3 orders of magnitude smaller than the uplift term, and should be resolvable when clocks improve their stability to the sub-millimetre level. Additionally, clocks can be compared over distances of thousands of kilometres on a short-term basis (e.g. hourly). These clock networks will improve our ability to monitor periodic effects with long-wavelength like the solid Earth tide.
  • We propose a way of including the next-to-leading (NLO) order spin-spin coupling into an effective-one-body (EOB) Hamiltonian. This work extends [S. Balmelli and P. Jetzer, Phys. Rev. D 87, 124036 (2013)], which is restricted to the case of equatorial orbits and aligned spins, to general orbits with arbitrary spin orientations. This is done applying appropriate canonical phase-space transformations to the NLO spin-spin Hamiltonian in Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) coordinates, and systematically adding "effectiv" quantities at NLO to all spin-squared terms appearing in the EOB Hamiltonian. As required by consistency, the introduced quantities reduce to zero in the test- mass limit. We expose the result both in a general gauge and in a gauge-fixed form. The last is chosen such as to minimize the number of new coefficients that have to be inserted into the effective spin squared. As a result, the 25 parameters that describe the ADM NLO spin-spin dynamics get condensed into only 12 EOB terms.
  • The canonical Arnowitt-Deser-Misner (ADM) Hamiltonian with next-to-leading order spin-spin coupling [J. Steinhoff, S. Hergt, and G. Sch\"afer] is converted into the EOB formalism of T. Damour, P. Jaranowski, and G. Sch\"afer for the special case of spinning black hole binaries whose spins are aligned with the angular momentum. In particular, we propose to include the new terms by adding a dynamical term of next-to-leading order to the Kerr parameter squared entering the effective metric. The modified EOB Hamiltonian consistently reduces to the Kerr Hamiltonian as the mass ratio tends to zero; moreover, it predicts the existence of an Innermost Stable Circular Orbit. We also derive, for the general case of arbitrarily oriented spins but in the vanishing mass-ratio limit, a coordinate transformation that maps the next-to-leading order spin-spin contribution of the ADM Hamiltonian to the EOB Hamiltonian.
  • Motivated by the parameterized post-Einsteinian (ppE) scheme devised by Yunes and Pretorius, which introduces corrections to the post-Newtonian coefficients of the frequency domain gravitational waveform in order to emulate alternative theories of gravity, we compute analytical time domain waveforms that, after a numerical Fourier transform, aim to represent (phase corrected only) ppE waveforms. In this formalism, alternative theories manifest themselves via corrections to the phase and frequency, as predicted by General Relativity (GR), at different post-Newtonian (PN) orders. In order to present a generic test of alternative theories of gravity, we assume that the coupling constant of each alternative theory is manifestly positive, allowing corrections to the GR waveforms to be either positive or negative. By exploring the capabilities of massive black hole binary GR waveforms in the detection and parameter estimation of corrected time domain ppE signals, using the current eLISA configuration (as presented for the ESA Cosmic Vision L3 mission), we demonstrate that for corrections arising at higher than 1PN order in phase and frequency, GR waveforms are sufficient for both detecting and estimating the parameters of alternative theory signals. However, for theories introducing corrections at the 0 and 0.5 PN order, GR waveforms are not capable of covering the entire parameter space, requiring the use of non-GR waveforms for detection and parameter estimation.
  • The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft's reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth's gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of $\Delta f/f \sim 10^{-16}$ in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters $|\beta -1|, |\gamma-1| \lesssim 10^{-6}$. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.
  • Compact binaries in hyperbolic orbits are plausible gravitational wave (GW) sources for the upcoming and planned GW observatories. We develop an efficient prescription to compute post-Newtonian (PN) accurate ready-to-use GW polarization states for spinning compact binaries, influenced by the dominant order spin-orbit interactions, in hyperbolic orbits. This is achieved by invoking the 1.5PN accurate quasi-Keplerian parameterization for the radial sector of the orbital dynamics. We probe the influences of spins and gravitational radiation reaction on $h_+$ and $h_{\times}$ during the hyperbolic passage. It turns out that both polarization states exhibit the memory effect for GWs from spinning compact binaries in hyperbolic orbits. In contrast, only cross polarization state exhibits the memory effect for GWs from non-spinning compact binaries. Additionally, we compute 1PN accurate amplitude corrected GW polarization states for hyperbolic non-spinning compact binaries in a fully parametric manner and perform initial comparisons with the existing waveforms.
  • We compute the PPN parameters $\gamma$ and $\beta$ for general scalar-tensor theories in the Einstein frame, which we compare to the existing PPN formulation in the Jordan frame for alternative theories of gravity. This computation is important for scalar-tensor theories that are expressed in the Einstein frame, such as chameleon and symmetron theories, which can incorporate hiding mechanisms that predict environment-dependent PPN parameters. We introduce a general formalism for scalar-tensor theories and constrain it using the limit on $\gamma$ given by the Cassini experiment. In particular we discuss massive Brans-Dicke scalar fields for extended sources. Next, using a recently proposed Earth satellite experiment, in which atomic clocks are used for spacecraft tracking, we compute the observable perturbations in the redshift induced by PPN parameters deviating from their general relativistic values. Our estimates suggest that $|\gamma - 1| \sim |\beta -1| \sim 10^{-6}$ may be detectable by a satellite that carries a clock with fractional frequency uncertainty $\Delta f/f \sim 10^{-16}$ in an eccentric orbit around the Earth. Such space experiments are within reach of existing atomic clock technology. We discuss further the requirements necessary for such a mission to detect deviations from Einstein relativity.
  • We present a recently developed prescription to obtain ready-to-use gravitational wave (GW) polarization states for spinning compact binaries on hyperbolic orbits. We include leading order spin-orbit interactions, invoking 1.5PN-accurate quasi-Keplerian parametrization for the radial part of the orbital dynamics. We also include radiation reaction effects on $h_+$ and $h_{\times}$ during the interaction. In the GW signals from spinning binaries there is evidence of the memory effect in both polarizations, in contrast to the non-spinning case, where only the cross polarizations exhibits non-vanishing amplitudes at infinite time. We also compute 1PN-accurate GW polarization states for non-spinning compact binaries in unbound orbits in a fully parametric way, and compare them with existing waveforms.
  • We review a recently proposed approach to construct gravitational wave (GW) polarization states of unbound spinning compact binaries. Through this rather simple method, we are able to include corrections due to the dominant order spin-orbit interactions, in the quadrupolar approximation and in a semi-analytic way. We invoke the 1.5 post-Newtonian (PN) accurate quasi-Keplerian parametrization for the radial part of the dynamics and impose its temporal evolution in the PN accurate polarization states equations. Further, we compute 1PN accurate amplitude corrections for the polarization states of non-spinning compact binaries on hyperbolic orbits. As an interesting application, we perform comparisons with previously available results for both the GW signals in the case of non-spinning binaries and the theoretical prediction for the amplitude of the memory effect on the metric after the hyperbolic passage.
  • Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent possible problems with the SPA, we test GR with corrected time domain waveforms instead of SPA waveforms. Since a considerable amount of work has been done already in the field using SPA waveforms, we establish a connection between leading-order-corrected waveforms in time and frequency domain, concentrating on phase-only corrected terms. In a Markov Chain Monte Carlo study, whose results are preliminary and will only be available later, we will assess the ability of the eLISA detector to measure deviations from GR for signals coming from supermassive black hole inspirals using these corrected waveforms.
  • We present in detail the scientific objectives in fundamental physics of the Space-Time Explorer and QUantum Equivalence Space Test (STE-QUEST) space mission. STE-QUEST was pre-selected by the European Space Agency together with four other missions for the cosmic vision M3 launch opportunity planned around 2024. It carries out tests of different aspects of the Einstein Equivalence Principle using atomic clocks, matter wave interferometry and long distance time/frequency links, providing fascinating science at the interface between quantum mechanics and gravitation that cannot be achieved, at that level of precision, in ground experiments. We especially emphasize the specific strong interest of performing equivalence principle tests in the quantum regime, i.e. using quantum atomic wave interferometry. Although STE-QUEST was finally not selected in early 2014 because of budgetary and technological reasons, its science case was very highly rated. Our aim is to expose that science to a large audience in order to allow future projects and proposals to take advantage of the STE-QUEST experience.
  • The successful miniaturization of extremely accurate atomic clocks invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precise timing experiments. This will allow effects predicted by general relativity to be detected in Earth's gravitational field. In this paper we introduce a convenient formalism for studying these effects, and compute the fractional timing differences generated by them for the orbit of a satellite capable of accurate time transfer to a terrestrial receiving station on Earth, as proposed by planned missions. We find that (1) Schwarzschild perturbations would be measurable through their effects both on the orbit and on the signal propagation, (2) frame-dragging of the orbit would be readily measurable, and (3) in optimistic scenarios, the spin-squared metric effects may be measurable for the first time ever. Our estimates suggest that a clock with a fractional timing inaccuracy of $10^{-16}$ on a highly eccentric Earth orbit will measure all these effects, while for a low Earth circular orbit like that of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space Mission, detection will be more challenging.
  • Microlensing observations toward globular clusters could be very useful to probe their low mass star and brown dwarf content. Using the large set of microlensing events detected so far toward the Galactic centre we investigated whether for some of the observed events the lenses are located in the Galactic globular clusters. Indeed, we found that in four cases some events might be due to lenses located in the globular clusters themselves. Moreover, we discuss a microlensing event found in M22. Using the adaptive optics system NACO at ESO VLT it was possible to identify the lens, which turned out to be a low mass star of about 0.18 solar masses in the globular cluster M22 itself.
  • Microlensing started with the seminal paper by Paczy\'nski in 1986, first with observations towards the Large Magellanic Cloud and the galactic bulge. Since then many other targets have been observed and new applications have been found. In particular, it turned out to be a powerful method to detect planets in our galaxy and even in the nearby M31. Here, we will present some results obtained so far by microlensing without being, however, exhaustive.
  • Unbound interacting compact binaries emit gravitational radiation in a wide frequency range. Since short burst-like signals are expected in future detectors, such as LISA or advanced LIGO, it is interesting to study their energy spectrum and the position of the frequency peak. Here we derive them for a system of massive objects interacting on hyperbolic orbits within the quadrupole approximation, following the work of Capozziello et al. In particular, we focus on the derivation of an analytic formula for the energy spectrum of the emitted waves. Within numerical approximation our formula is in agreement with the two known limiting cases: for the eccentricity {\epsilon} = 1, the parabolic case, whose spectrum was computed by Berry and Gair, and the large {\epsilon} limit with the formula given by Turner.
  • The geoid is the true physical figure of the Earth, a particular equipotential surface of the gravity field of the Earth that accounts for the effect of all subsurface density variations. Its shape approximates best (in the sense of least squares) the mean level of oceans, but the geoid is more difficult to determine over continents. Satellite missions carry out distance measurements and derive the gravity field to provide geoid maps over the entire globe. However, they require calibration and extensive computations including integration, which is a non-unique operation. Here we propose a direct method and a new tool that directly measures geopotential differences on continents using atomic clocks. General Relativity Theory predicts constant clock rate at sea level, and faster (resp. slower) clock rate above (resp. below) sea level. The technology of atomic clocks is on the doorstep of reaching an accuracy level in clock rate that is equivalent to 1 cm in determining equipotential surface (including geoid) height. We discuss the value and future applicability of such measurements including direct geoid mapping on continents, and joint gravity and geopotential surveying to invert for subsurface density anomalies. Our synthetic calculations show that the geoid perturbation caused by a 1.5 km radius sphere with 20% density anomaly buried at 2 km depth in the crust of the Earth is already detectable by atomic clocks of achievable accuracy. Therefore atomic clock geopotential surveys, used together with relative gravity data to benefit from their different depth sensitivities, can become a useful tool in mapping density anomalies within the Earth.
  • We review the expected science performance of the New Gravitational-Wave Observatory (NGO, a.k.a. eLISA), a mission under study by the European Space Agency for launch in the early 2020s. eLISA will survey the low-frequency gravitational-wave sky (from 0.1 mHz to 1 Hz), detecting and characterizing a broad variety of systems and events throughout the Universe, including the coalescences of massive black holes brought together by galaxy mergers; the inspirals of stellar-mass black holes and compact stars into central galactic black holes; several millions of ultracompact binaries, both detached and mass transferring, in the Galaxy; and possibly unforeseen sources such as the relic gravitational-wave radiation from the early Universe. eLISA's high signal-to-noise measurements will provide new insight into the structure and history of the Universe, and they will test general relativity in its strong-field dynamical regime.