• Using both a resonant level model and the time-dependent Gutzwiller approximation, we study the power dissipation of a localized impurity hybridized with a conduction band when the hybridization is periodically switched on and off. The total dissipated energy is proportional to the Kondo temperature, with a non-trivial frequency dependence. At low frequencies it can be well approximated by the one of a single quench, and is obtainable analitically; at intermediate frequencies it undergoes oscillations; at high frequencies, after reaching its maximum, it quickly drops to zero. This frequency-dependent energy dissipation could be relevant to systems such as irradiated quantum dots, where Kondo can be switched at very high frequencies.
  • The onset or demise of Kondo effect in a magnetic impurity on a metal surface can be triggered, as often observed, by the simple mechanical nudging of a tip. This mechanically-driven quantum phase transition must reflect in a corresponding mechanical dissipation peak; yet, this kind of effect has not been focused upon so far. Aiming at the simplest theoretical modeling, we initially treat the impurity as a non-interacting resonant level turned cyclically on and off, and obtain a dissipation per cycle which is proportional to the hybridization $\Gamma$, with a characteristic temperature dependent resonant peak value. A better treatment is obtained next by solving an Anderson impurity model by numerical renormalization group. Here, many body effects yield a dissipation whose peak value is now proportional to $T_K |\log T|$ so long as $T\sim T_K$, followed for $T\sim \Gamma$ by a second high temperature regime where dissipation is proportional to $\Gamma|\log T|$. The detectability of Kondo mechanical dissipation in atomic force microscopy is discussed.
  • Scanning tunnelling microscopy and break-junction experiments realize metallic and molecular nanocontacts that act as ideal one-dimensional channels between macroscopic electrodes. Emergent nanoscale phenomena typical of these systems encompass structural, mechanical, electronic, transport, and magnetic properties. This Review focuses on the theoretical explanation of some of these properties obtained with the help of first-principles methods. By tracing parallel theoretical and experimental developments from the discovery of nanowire formation and conductance quantization in gold nanowires to recent observations of emergent magnetism and Kondo correlations, we exemplify the main concepts and ingredients needed to bring together ab initio calculations and physical observations. It can be anticipated that diode, sensor, spin-valve and spin-filter functionalities relevant for spintronics and molecular electronics applications will benefit from the physical understanding thus obtained.
  • Cotunneling into Kondo systems, where an electron enters a $f$-electron material via a cotunneling process through the local-moment orbital, has been proposed to explain the characteristic lineshapes observed in scanning-tunneling-spectroscopy (STS) experiments. Here we extend the theory of electron cotunneling to Kondo-lattice systems where the bulk hybridization between conduction and $f$ electrons is odd under inversion, being particularly relevant to Kondo insulators. Compared to the case of even hybridization, we show that the interference between normal tunneling and cotunneling processes is fundamentally altered: it is entirely absent for layered, i.e., quasi-two-dimensional materials, while its energy dependence is strongly modified for three-dimensional materials. We discuss implications for STS experiments.
  • Employing the $\mathbf{k}\cdot\mathbf{p}$ expansion for a family of tight-binding models for SmB$_6$, we analytically compute topological surface states on a generic $(lmn)$ surface. We show how the Dirac-cone spin structure depends on model ingredients and on the angle $\theta$ between the surface normal and the main crystal axes. We apply the general theory to $(001)$, $(110)$, $(111)$, and $(210)$ surfaces, for which we provide concrete predictions for the spin pattern of surface states which we also compare with tight-binding results. As shown in previous work, the spin pattern on a $(001)$ surface can be related to the value of mirror Chern numbers, and we explore the possibility of topological phase transitions between states with different mirror Chern numbers and the associated change of the spin structure of surface states. Such transitions may be accessed by varying either the hybridization term in the Hamiltonian or the crystal-field splitting of the low-energy $f$ multiplets, and we compute corresponding phase diagrams.
  • For the strongly correlated topological insulator SmB6 we discuss the influence of a 2x1 reconstruction of the (001) surface on the topological surface states. Depending on microscopic details, the reconstruction can be a weak or a strong perturbation to the electronic states. While the former leads to a weak backfolding of surface bands only, the latter can modify the surface-state dispersion and lead to a Lifshitz transition. We analyze the quasiparticle interference signal: while this tends to be weak in models for SmB6 in the absence of surface reconstruction, we find that the 2x1 reconstruction can induce novel peaks. We discuss experimental implications.
  • SmB6 was recently proposed to be both a strong topological insulator and a topological crystalline insulator. For this and related cubic topological Kondo insulators, we prove the existence of four different topological phases, distinguished by the sign of mirror Chern numbers. We characterize these phases in terms of simple observables, and we provide concrete tight-binding models for each phase. Based on theoretical and experimental results for SmB6 we conclude that it realizes the phase with C^+_{k_z=0}=+2, C^+_{k_z=pi}=+1, C^+_{k_x=k_y}=-1, and we propose a corresponding minimal model.
  • SmB6 is one of the candidate compounds for topological Kondo insulators, a class of materials which combines a non-trivial topological band structure with strong electronic correlations. Here we employ a multiband tight-binding description, supplemented by a slave-particle approach to account for strong interactions, to theoretically study the surface-state signatures in scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and quasiparticle interference (QPI). We discuss the spin structure of the three surface Dirac cones of SmB6 and provide concrete predictions for the energy and momentum dependence of the resulting QPI signal. Our results also apply to PuB6, a strongly correlated topological insulator with a very similar electronic structure.
  • A fascinating type of symmetry-protected topological states of matter are topological Kondo insulators, where insulating behavior arises from Kondo screening of localized moments via conduction electrons, and non-trivial topology emerges from the structure of the hybridization between the local-moment and conduction bands. Here we study the physics of Kondo holes, i.e., missing local moments, in three-dimensional topological Kondo insulators, using a self-consistent real-space mean-field theory. Such Kondo holes quite generically induce in-gap states which, for Kondo holes at or near the surface, hybridize with the topological surface state. In particular, we study the surface-state quasiparticle interference (QPI) induced by a dilute concentration of surface Kondo holes and compare this to QPI from conventional potential scatterers. We treat both strong and weak topological-insulator phases and, for the latter, specifically discuss the contributions to QPI from inter-Dirac-cone scattering.
  • Low-temperature electronic conductance in nanocontacts, scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), and metal break junctions involving magnetic atoms or molecules is a growing area with important unsolved theoretical problems. While the detailed relationship between contact geometry and electronic structure requires a quantitative ab initio approach such as density functional theory (DFT), the Kondo many-body effects ensuing from the coupling of the impurity spin with metal electrons are most properly addressed by formulating a generalized Anderson impurity model to be solved with, for example, the numerical renormalization group (NRG) method. Since there is at present no seamless scheme that can accurately carry out that program, we have in recent years designed a systematic method for semiquantitatively joining DFT and NRG. We apply this DFT-NRG scheme to the ideal conductance of single wall (4,4) and (8,8) nanotubes with magnetic adatoms (Co and Fe), both inside and outside the nanotube, and with a single carbon atom vacancy. A rich scenario emerges, with Kondo temperatures generally in the Kelvin range, and conductance anomalies ranging from a single channel maximum to destructive Fano interference with cancellation of two channels out of the total four. The configuration yielding the highest Kondo temperature (tens of Kelvins) and a measurable zero-bias anomaly is that of a Co or Fe impurity inside the narrowest nanotube. The single atom vacancy has a spin, but a very low Kondo temperature is predicted. The geometric, electronic, and symmetry factors influencing this variability are all accessible, which makes this approach methodologically instructive and highlights many delicate and difficult points in the first-principles modeling of the Kondo effect in nanocontacts.
  • Molecular contacts are generally poorly conducting because their energy levels tend to lie far from the Fermi energy of the metal contact, necessitating undesirably large gate and bias voltages in molecular electronics applications. Molecular radicals are an exception because their partly filled orbitals undergo Kondo screening, opening the way to electron passage even at zero bias. While that phenomenon has been experimentally demonstrated for several complex organic radicals, quantitative theoretical predictions have not been attempted so far. It is therefore an open question whether and to what extent an ab initio-based theory is able to make accurate predictions for Kondo temperatures and conductance lineshapes. Choosing nitric oxide NO as a simple and exemplary spin 1/2 molecular radical, we present calculations based on a combination of density functional theory and numerical renormalization group (DFT+NRG) predicting a zero bias spectral anomaly with a Kondo temperature of 15 K for NO/Au(111). A scanning tunneling spectroscopy study is subsequently carried out to verify the prediction, and a striking zero bias Kondo anomaly is confirmed, still quite visible at liquid nitrogen temperatures. Comparison shows that the experimental Kondo temperature of about 43 K is larger than the theoretical one, while the inverted Fano lineshape implies a strong source of interference not included in the model. These discrepancies are not a surprise, providing in fact an instructive measure of the approximations used in the modeling, which supports and qualifies the viability of the DFT+NRG approach to the prediction of conductance anomalies in larger molecular radicals.
  • We propose that a simple device of three laterally-coupled quantum dots, the central one contacted by metal leads, can realize the ferromagnetic Kondo model, which is characterized by interesting properties like a non-analytic inverted zero-bias anomaly and an extreme sensitivity to a magnetic field. Furthermore, by tuning the gate voltages of the lateral dots, this device may allow to study the transition from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic Kondo effect, a simple case of a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. We model the device by three coupled Anderson impurities that we study by numerical renormalization group. We calculate the single-particle spectral function of the central dot, which at zero frequency is proportional to the zero-bias conductance, across the transition, both in the absence and in the presence of a magnetic field.
  • It has been recently shown that the particle-hole symmetric Anderson impurity model can be mapped onto a $Z_2$ slave-spin theory without any need of additional constraints. Here we prove by means of Numerical Renormalization Group that the slave-spin behaves in this model like a two-level system coupled to a sub-ohmic dissipative environment. It follows that the $Z_2$ symmetry gets spontaneously broken at zero temperature, which we find can be identified with the on-set of Kondo coherence, being the Kondo temperature proportional to the square of the order parameter. Since the model is numerically solvable, the results are very enlightening on the role of quantum fluctuations beyond mean field in the context of slave-boson approaches to correlated electron models, an issue that has been attracting interest since the 80's. Finally, our results suggest as a by-product that the paramagnetic metal phase of the Hubbard model at half-filling, in infinite coordination lattices and at zero temperature, as described for instance by Dynamical Mean Field Theory, corresponds to a slave-spin theory with a spontaneous breakdown of a local $Z_2$ gauge symmetry.