• To estimate the time, many organisms, ranging from cyanobacteria to animals, employ a circadian clock which is based on a limit-cycle oscillator that can tick autonomously with a nearly 24h period. Yet, a limit-cycle oscillator is not essential for knowing the time, as exemplified by bacteria that possess an 'hourglass': a system that when forced by an oscillatory light input exhibits robust oscillations from which the organism can infer the time, but that in the absence of driving relaxes to a stable fixed point. Here, using models of the Kai system of cyanobacteria, we compare a limit- cycle oscillator with two hourglass models, one that without driving relaxes exponentially and one that does so in an oscillatory fashion. In the limit of low input-noise, all three systems are equally informative on time, yet in the regime of high input-noise the limit-cycle oscillator is far superior. The same behavior is found in the Stuart-Landau model, indicating that our result is universal.
  • Biochemical reactions are fundamentally noisy at a molecular scale. This limits the precision of reaction networks, but also allows fluctuation measurements which may reveal the structure and dynamics of the underlying biochemical network. Here, we study non-equilibrium reaction cycles, such as the mechanochemical cycle of molecular motors, the phosphorylation cycle of circadian clock proteins, or the transition state cycle of enzymes. Fluctuations in such cycles may be measured using either of two classical definitions of the randomness parameter, which we show to be equivalent in general microscopically reversible cycles. We define a stochastic period for reversible cycles and present analytical solutions for its moments. Furthermore, we associate the two forms of the randomness parameter with the thermodynamic uncertainty relation, which sets limits on the timing precision of the cycle in terms of thermodynamic quantities. Our results should prove useful also for the study of temporal fluctuations in more general networks.
  • Biochemical reactions typically occur at low copy numbers, but at once in crowded and diverse environments. Space and stochasticity therefore play an essential role in biochemical networks. Spatial-stochastic simulations have become a prominent tool for understanding how stochasticity at the microscopic level influences the macroscopic behavior of such systems. However, while particle-based models guarantee the level of detail necessary to accurately describe the microscopic dynamics at very low copy numbers, the algorithms used to simulate them oftentimes imply trade-offs between computational efficiency and accuracy. eGFRD (enhanced Green's Function Reaction Dynamics) is an exact algorithm that evades such trade-offs by partitioning the N-particle system into M<N analytically tractable one- and two-particle systems; the analytical solutions (Green's functions) then are used to implement an event-driven particle-based scheme that allows particles to make large jumps in time and space while retaining access to their state variables at any moment. Here we present "eGFRD2", a new eGFRD version that implements the principle of eGFRD in all dimensions, enabling efficient simulation of biochemical reaction-diffusion processes in the 3D cytoplasm, on 2D planes representing membranes, and on 1D elongated cylinders representative of, e.g., cytoskeletal tracks or DNA; in 1D, it also incorporates convective motion used to model active transport. We find that, for low particle densities, eGFRD2 is up to 3 orders of magnitude faster than optimized Brownian Dynamics. We exemplify the capabilities of eGFRD2 by simulating an idealized model of Pom1 gradient formation, which involves 3D diffusion, active transport on microtubules, and autophosphorylation on the membrane, confirming recent results on this system and demonstrating that it can efficiently operate under genuinely stochastic conditions.
  • Circadian clocks must be able to entrain to time-varying signals to keep their oscillations in phase with the day-night rhythm. On the other hand, they must also exhibit input compensation: their period must remain about one day in different constant environments. The post-translational oscillator of the Kai system can be entrained by transient or oscillatory changes in the ATP fraction, yet is insensitive to constant changes in this fraction. We study in three different models of this system how these two seemingly conflicting criteria are met: the Van Zon model (Van Zon et al., PNAS, 2007), the Rust model (Phong et al., PNAS, 2013), and our new model (Paijmans et al., arXiv:1612.02715). We find that the new model exhibits the best trade-off between input compensation and entrainability: on the footing of equal phase-response curves, it exhibits the strongest input compensation. Performing stochastic simulations at the level of individual hexamers allows us to identify a new mechanism, which is employed by the new model to achieve input compensation: At lower ATP fraction, the individual hexamers make a shorter cycle in the phosphorylation state space, which compensates for the slower pace at which they traverse the cycle.
  • Circadian clocks are biochemical oscillators that allow organisms to estimate the time of the day. These oscillators are inherently noisy due to the discrete nature of the reactants and the stochastic character of their interactions. To keep these oscillators in sync with the daily day-night rhythm in the presence of noise, circadian clocks must be coupled to the dark-light cycle. In this manuscript, we study the entrainment of phase oscillators as a function of the intrinsic noise in the system. Using stochastic simulations, we compute the optimal coupling strength, intrinsic frequency and shape of the phase-response curve, that maximize the mutual information between the phase of the clock and time. We show that the optimal coupling strength and intrinsic frequency increase with the noise, but that the shape of the phase-response curve varies non-monotonically with the noise: in the low-noise regime, it features a deadzone that increases in width as the noise increases, while in the high-noise regime, the width decreases with the noise. These results arise from a trade-off between maximizing stability -noise suppression - and maximizing linearity of the input-output, i.e. time- phase, relation. We also show that three analytic approximations -the linear-noise approximation, the phase-averaging method, and linear-response theory- accurately describe different regimes of the coupling strength and the noise.
  • Biochemical networks play a crucial role in biological systems, implementing a broad range of vital functions. They normally operate at low copy numbers and in spatial settings, but this is often ignored and well-stirred conditions are assumed. Yet, it is increasingly becoming clear that even microscopic spatial inhomogeneities oftentimes can induce significant differences on the macroscopic level. Since experimental observation of single-molecule behavior is extremely challenging, theoretical modeling of biochemical reactions on the single-particle level is an important tool for understanding spatial effects in biochemical systems. While purely analytical models quickly become intractable here, spatial-stochastic simulations can capture a wide range of biochemical processes with the necessary levels of detail. Here we discuss different techniques for spatial-stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems, and explain important precautions required to make them biochemically accurate and efficient. We illustrate non-negligible accuracy issues arising even in the most simple approaches to biochemical simulation, and present methods to deal with them. We first explain how Brownian Dynamics, a widely used particle-based diffusion simulation technique with fixed propagation time, can be adapted to incorporate chemical reactions, and portray a range of schemes that elaborate on this idea. We then introduce event-driven spatial-stochastic simulation methods, in which system updates are performed asynchronously with situation-dependent, varying time steps; here we particularly focus on eGFRD, a computationally efficient particle-based algorithm that makes use of analytical functions to accurately sample interparticle reactions and diffusive motion with large jumps in time and space. We end by briefly presenting recent developments in the field of spatial-stochastic biochemical simulation.
  • Living cells use readout molecules to record the state of receptor proteins, similar to measurements or copies in typical computational devices. But is this analogy rigorous? Can cells be optimally efficient, and if not, why? We show that, as in computation, a canonical biochemical readout network generates correlations; extracting no work from these correlations sets a lower bound on dissipation. For general input, the biochemical network cannot reach this bound, even with arbitrarily slow reactions or weak thermodynamic driving. It faces an accuracy-dissipation trade-off that is qualitatively distinct from and worse than implied by the bound, and more complex steady-state copy processes cannot perform better. Nonetheless, the cost remains close to the thermodynamic bound unless accuracy is extremely high. Additionally, we show that biomolecular reactions could be used in thermodynamically optimal devices under exogenous manipulation of chemical fuels, suggesting an experimental system for testing computational thermodynamics.
  • Living cells use readout molecules to record the state of receptor proteins, similar to measurements or copies in typical computational devices. But is this analogy rigorous? Can cells be optimally efficient, and if not, why? We show that, as in computation, a canonical biochemical readout network generates correlations; extracting no work from these correlations sets a lower bound on dissipation. For general input, the biochemical network cannot reach this bound, even with arbitrarily slow reactions or weak thermodynamic driving. It faces an accuracy-dissipation trade-off that is qualitatively distinct from and worse than implied by the bound, and more complex steady-state copy processes cannot perform better. Nonetheless, the cost remains close to the thermodynamic bound unless accuracy is extremely high. Additionally, we show that biomolecular reactions could be used in thermodynamically optimal devices under exogenous manipulation of chemical fuels, suggesting an experimental system for testing computational thermodynamics.
  • Synthetic biology sets out to implement new functions in cells, and to develop a deeper understanding of biological design principles. In 2000, Elowitz and Leibler showed that by rational design of the reaction network, and using existing biological components, they could create a network that exhibits periodic gene expression, dubbed the repressilator (Elowitz and Leibler, Nature, 2000). More recently, Stricker et al. presented another synthetic oscillator, called the dual-feedback oscillator (Stricker et al., 2008), which is more stable. How the stability of these oscillators is affected by the intrinsic noise of the interactions between the components and the stochastic expression of their genes, has been studied in considerable detail. However, as all biological oscillators reside in growing and dividing cells, an important question is how these oscillators are perturbed by the cell cycle. In previous work we showed that the periodic doubling of the gene copy numbers due to DNA replication can couple not only natural, circadian oscillators to the cell cycle (Paijmans et al., PNAS, \textbf{113}, 4063, (2016)), but also these synthetic oscillators. Here we expand this study. We find that the strength of the locking between oscillators depends not only on the positions of the genes on the chromosome, but also on the noise in the timing of gene replication: noise tends to weaken the coupling. Yet, even in the limit of high levels of noise in the replication times of the genes, both synthetic oscillators show clear signatures of locking to the cell cycle. This work enhances our understanding of the design of robust biological oscillators inside growing and diving cells.
  • The principal pacemaker of the circadian clock of the cyanobacterium S. elongatus is a protein phosphorylation cycle consisting of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. KaiC forms a homohexamer, with each monomer consisting of two domains, CI and CII. Both domains can bind and hydrolyze ATP, but only the CII domain can be phosphorylated, at two residues, in a well-defined sequence. While this system has been studied extensively, how the clock is driven thermodynamically has remained elusive. Inspired by recent experimental observations and building on ideas from previous mathematical models, we present a new, thermodynamically consistent, statistical-mechanical model of the clock. At its heart are two main ideas: i) ATP hydrolysis in the CI domain provides the thermodynamic driving force for the clock, switching KaiC between an active conformational state in which its phosphorylation level tends to rise and an inactive one in which it tends to fall; ii) phosphorylation of the CII domain provides the timer for the hydrolysis in the CI domain. The model also naturally explains how KaiA, by acting as a nucleotide exchange factor, can stimulate phosphorylation of KaiC, and how the differential affinity of KaiA for the different KaiC phosphoforms generates the characteristic temporal order of KaiC phosphorylation. As the phosphorylation level in the CII domain rises, the release of ADP from CI slows down, making the inactive conformational state of KaiC more stable. In the inactive state, KaiC binds KaiB, which not only stabilizes this state further, but also leads to the sequestration of KaiA, and hence to KaiC dephosphorylation. Using a dedicated kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, we show that the model can describe a wealth of experimental data.
  • The modeling of complex reaction-diffusion processes in, for instance, cellular biochemical networks or self-assembling soft matter can be tremendously sped up by employing a multiscale algorithm which combines the mesoscopic Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (GFRD) method with explicit stochastic Brownian, Langevin, or deterministic Molecular Dynamics to treat reactants at the microscopic scale [A. Vijaykumar, P.G. Bolhuis and P.R. ten Wolde, J. Chem. Phys. {\bf 43}, 21: 214102 (2015)]. Here we extend this multiscale BD-GFRD approach to include the orientational dynamics that is crucial to describe the anisotropic interactions often prevalent in biomolecular systems. We illustrate the novel algorithm using a simple patchy particle model. After validation of the algorithm we discuss its performance. The rotational BD-GFRD multiscale method will open up the possibility for large scale simulations of e.g. protein signalling networks.
  • We propose a physically-realisable biochemical device that is coupled to a biochemical reservoir of mutual information, fuel molecules and a chemical bath. Mutual information allows work to be done on the bath even when the fuel molecules appear to be in equilibrium; alternatively, mutual information can be created by driving from the fuel or the bath. The system exhibits diverse behaviour, including a regime in which the information, despite increasing during the reaction, enhances the extracted work. We further demonstrate that a modified device can function without the need for external manipulation, eliminating the need for a complex and potentially costly control.
  • Circadian clocks are the central timekeepers of life, allowing cells to anticipate changes between day and night. Experiments in recent years have revealed that circadian clocks can be highly stable, raising the question how reliably they can be read out. Here, we combine mathematical modeling with information theory to address the question how accurately a cell can infer the time from an ensemble of protein oscillations, which are driven by a circadian clock. We show that the precision increases with the number of oscillations and their amplitude relative to their noise. Our analysis also reveals that their exists an optimal phase relation that minimizes the error in the estimate of time, which depends on the relative noise levels of the protein oscillations. Lastly, our work shows that cross-correlations in the noise of the protein oscillations can enhance the mutual information, which suggests that cross-regulatory interactions between the proteins that read out the clock can be beneficial for temporal information transmission.
  • Living cells can enhance their fitness by anticipating environmental change. We study how accurately linear signaling networks in cells can predict future signals. We find that maximal predictive power results from a combination of input-noise suppression, linear extrapolation, and selective readout of correlated past signal values. Single-layer networks generate exponential response kernels, which suffice to predict Markovian signals optimally. Multilayer networks allow oscillatory kernels that can optimally predict non-Markovian signals. At low noise, these kernels exploit the signal derivative for extrapolation, while at high noise, they capitalize on signal values in the past that are strongly correlated with the future signal. We show how the common motifs of negative feedback and incoherent feed-forward can implement these optimal response functions. Simulations reveal that E. coli can reliably predict concentration changes for chemotaxis, and that the integration time of its response kernel arises from a trade-off between rapid response and noise suppression.
  • Many membrane-bound molecules in cells form small clusters. It has been hypothesized that these clusters convert an analog extracellular signal into a digital intracellular signal and that this conversion increases signaling fidelity. However, the mechanism by which clusters digitize a signal and the subsequent effects on fidelity remain poorly understood. Here we demonstrate using a stochastic model of cooperative cluster formation that sufficient cooperation leads to digital signaling. We show that despite reducing the number of output states, which decreases fidelity, digitization also reduces noise in the system, which increases fidelity. The tradeoff between these effects leads to an optimal cluster size that agrees with experimental measurements.
  • Many organisms possess both a cell cycle to control DNA replication and a circadian clock to anticipate changes between day and night. In some cases, these two rhythmic systems are known to be coupled by specific, cross-regulatory interactions. Here, we use mathematical modeling to show that, additionally, the cell cycle generically influences circadian clocks in a non-specific fashion: The regular, discrete jumps in gene-copy number arising from DNA replication during the cell cycle cause a periodic driving of the circadian clock, which can dramatically alter its behavior and impair its function. A clock built on negative transcriptional feedback either phase locks to the cell cycle, so that the clock period tracks the cell division time, or exhibits erratic behavior. We argue that the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus has evolved two features that protect its clock from such disturbances, both of which are needed to fully insulate it from the cell cycle and give it its observed robustness: a phosphorylation-based protein modification oscillator, together with its accompanying push-pull read-out circuit that responds primarily to the ratios of the different phosphoforms, makes the clock less susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis; and the presence of multiple, asynchronously replicating copies of the same chromosome diminishes the effect of replicating any single copy of a gene.
  • In recent years experiments have demonstrated that living cells can measure low chemical concentrations with high precision, and much progress has been made in understanding what sets the fundamental limit to the precision of chemical sensing. Chemical concentration measurements start with the binding of ligand molecules to receptor proteins, which is an inherently noisy process, especially at low concentrations. The signaling networks that transmit the information on the ligand concentration from the receptors into the cell have to filter this noise extrinsic to the cell as much as possible. These networks, however, are also stochastic in nature, which means that they will also add noise to the transmitted signal. In this review, we will first discuss how the diffusive transport and binding of ligand to the receptor sets the receptor correlation time, and then how downstream signaling pathways integrate the noise in the receptor state; we will discuss how the number of receptors, the receptor correlation time, and the effective integration time together set a fundamental limit on the precision of sensing. We then discuss how cells can remove the receptor noise while simultaneously suppressing the intrinsic noise in the signaling network. We describe why this mechanism of time integration requires three classes of resources---receptors and their integration time, readout molecules, energy---and how each resource class sets a fundamental sensing limit. We also briefly discuss the scheme of maximum-likelihood estimation, the role of receptor cooperativity, and how cellular copy protocols differ from canonical copy protocols typically considered in the computational literature, explaining why cellular sensing systems can never reach the Landauer limit on the optimal trade-off between accuracy and energetic cost.
  • Double phosphorylation of protein kinases is a common feature of signalling cascades. This motif may reduce cross-talk between signalling pathways, as the second phosphorylation site allows for proofreading, especially when phosphorylation is distributive rather than processive. Recent studies suggest that phosphorylation can be `pseudo-processive' in the crowded cellular environment, as rebinding after the first phosphorylation is enhanced by slow diffusion. Here, we use a simple model with unsaturated reactants to show that specificity for one substrate over another drops as rebinding increases and pseudo-processive behavior becomes possible. However, this loss of specificity with increased rebinding is typically also observed if two distinct enzyme species are required for phosphorylation, i.e. when the system is necessarily distributive. Thus the loss of specificity is due to an intrinsic reduction in selectivity with increased rebinding, which benefits inefficient reactions, rather than pseudo-processivity itself. We also show that proofreading can remain effective when the intended signalling pathway exhibits high levels of rebinding-induced pseudo-processivity, unlike other proposed advantages of the dual phosphorylation motif.
  • Clustering of molecules on biological membranes is a widely observed phenomenon. In some cases, such as the clustering of Ras proteins on the membranes of mammalian cells, proper cell signaling is critically dependent on the maintenance of these clusters. Yet, the mechanism by which clusters form and are maintained in these systems remains unclear. Recently, it has been discovered that activated Ras promotes further Ras activation. Here we show using particle-based simulation that this positive feedback is sufficient to produce persistent clusters of active Ras molecules at the nanometer scale via a dynamic nucleation mechanism. Furthermore, we find that our cluster statistics are consistent with experimental observations of the Ras system. Interestingly, we show that our model does not support a Turing regime of macroscopic reaction-diffusion patterning, and therefore that the clustering we observe is a purely stochastic effect, arising from the coupling of positive feedback with the discrete nature of individual molecules. These results underscore the importance of stochastic and dynamic properties of reaction diffusion systems for biological behavior.
  • The diffusive arrival of transcription factors at the promoter sites on the DNA sets a lower bound on how accurately a cell can regulate its protein levels. Using results from the literature on diffusion-influenced reactions, we derive an analytical expression for the lower bound on the precision of transcriptional regulation. In our theory, transcription factors can perform multiple rounds of 1D diffusion along the DNA and 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm before binding to the promoter. Comparing our expression for the lower bound on the precision against results from Green's Function Reaction Dynamics simulations shows that the theory is highly accurate under biologically relevant conditions. Our results demonstrate that, to an excellent approximation, the promoter switches between the transcription-factor bound and unbound state in a Markovian fashion. This remains true even in the presence of sliding, i.e. with 1D diffusion along the DNA. This has two important implications: (1) minimizing the noise in the promoter state is equivalent to minimizing the search time of transcription factors for their promoters; (2) the complicated dynamics of 3D diffusion in the cytoplasm and 1D diffusion along the DNA can be captured in a well-stirred model by renormalizing the promoter association and dissociation rates, making it possible to efficiently simulate the promoter dynamics using Gillespie simulations. Based on the recent experimental observation that sliding can speed up the promoter search by a factor of 4, our theory predicts that sliding can enhance the precision of transcriptional regulation by a factor of 2.
  • Living cells deploy many resources to sense their environments, including receptors, downstream signaling molecules, time and fuel. However, it is not known which resources fundamentally limit the precision of sensing, like weak links in a chain, and which can compensate each other, leading to trade-offs between them. We show by modeling that in equilibrium systems the precision is limited by the number of receptors; the downstream network can never increase precision. This limit arises from a trade-off between the removal of extrinsic noise in the receptor and intrinsic noise in the downstream network. Non-equilibrium systems can lift this trade-off by storing the receptor state over time in chemical modification states of downstream molecules. As we quantify for a push-pull network, this requires i) time and receptors; ii) downstream molecules; iii) energy (fuel turnover) to drive modification. These three resource classes cannot compensate each other, and it is the limiting class which sets the fundamental sensing limit. Within each class, trade-offs are possible. Energy allows a power-speed trade-off, while time can be traded against receptors.
  • Cells sense and predict their environment via energy-dissipating pathways. However, it is unclear whether dissipation helps or harms prediction. Here we study dissipation and prediction for a minimal sensory module of receptors that reversibly bind ligand. We find that the module performs short-term prediction optimally when operating in an adiabatic regime where dissipation vanishes. In contrast, beyond a critical forecast interval, prediction becomes most precise in a regime of maximal dissipation, suggesting that dissipative sensing in biological systems can serve to enhance prediction performance.
  • It is now well established that the cell is a highly crowded environment. Yet, the effects of crowding on the dynamics of signaling pathways, gene regulation networks and metabolic networks are still largely unknown. Crowding can alter both molecular diffusion and the equilibria of biomolecular reactions. In this review, we first discuss how diffusion can affect biochemical networks. Diffusion of transcription factors can increase noise in gene expression, while diffusion of proteins between intracellular compartments or between cells can reduce concentration fluctuations. In push-pull networks diffusion can impede information transmission, while in multi-site protein modification networks diffusion can qualitatively change the macroscopic response of the system, such as the loss or emergence of bistability. Moreover, diffusion can directly change the metabolic flux. We describe how crowding affects diffusion, and thus how all these phenomena are influenced by crowding. Yet, a potentially more important effect of crowding on biochemical networks is mediated via the shift in the equilibria of bimolecular reactions, and we provide computational evidence that supports this idea. Finally, we discuss how the effects of crowding can be incorporated in models of biochemical networks.
  • In recent years it is increasingly being recognized that biochemical signals are not necessarily constant in time and that the temporal dynamics of a signal can be the information carrier. Moreover, it is now well established that components are often shared between signaling pathways. Here we show by mathematical modeling that living cells can multiplex a constant and an oscillatory signal: they can transmit these two signals through the same signaling pathway simultaneously, and yet respond to them specifically and reliably. We find that information transmission is reduced not only by noise arising from the intrinsic stochasticity of biochemical reactions, but also by crosstalk between the different channels. Yet, under biologically relevant conditions more than 2 bits of information can be transmitted per channel, even when the two signals are transmitted simultaneously. These observations suggest that oscillatory signals are ideal for multiplexing signals.
  • Spatial heterogeneity is a hallmark of living systems, even at the molecular scale in individual cells. A key example is the partitioning of membrane-bound proteins via lipid domain formation or cytoskeleton-induced corralling. Yet the impact of this spatial heterogeneity on biochemical signaling processes is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that partitioning improves the reliability of biochemical signaling. We exactly solve a stochastic model describing a ubiquitous motif in membrane signaling. The solution reveals that partitioning improves signaling reliability via two effects: it moderates the non-linearity of the switching response, and it reduces noise in the response by suppressing correlations between molecules. An optimal partition size arises from a trade-off between minimizing the number of proteins per partition to improve signaling reliability and ensuring sufficient proteins per partition to maintain signal propagation. The predicted optimal partition size agrees quantitatively with experimentally observed systems. These results persist in spatial simulations with explicit diffusion barriers. Our findings suggest that molecular partitioning is not merely a consequence of the complexity of cellular substructures, but also plays an important functional role in cell signaling.