• We revisit neutrino oscillations in matter considering the open quantum system framework which allows to introduce possible decoherence effects generated by New Physics in a phenomenological manner. We assume that the decoherence parameters $\gamma_{ij}$ may depend on the neutrino energy, as $\gamma_{ij}=\gamma_{ij}^{0}(E/\text{GeV})^n$ $(n = 0,\pm1,\pm2) $. The case of non-uniform matter is studied in detail, both within the adiabatic approximation and in the more general non-adiabatic case. In particular, we develop a consistent formalism to study the non-adiabatic case dividing the matter profile into an arbitrary number of layers of constant densities. This formalism is then applied to explore the sensitivity of IceCube and DeepCore to this type of effects. Our study is the first atmospheric neutrino analysis where a consistent treatment of the matter effects in the three-neutrino case is performed in presence of decoherence. We show that matter effects are indeed extremely relevant in this context. We find that IceCube is able to considerably improve over current bounds in the solar sector ($\gamma_{21}$) and in the atmospheric sector ($\gamma_{31}$ and $\gamma_{32}$) for $n=0,1,2$ and, in particular, by several orders of magnitude (between 3 and 9) for the $n=1,2$ cases. For $n=0$ we find $\gamma_{32},\gamma_{31}< 4.0\cdot10^{-24} (1.3\cdot10^{-24})$ GeV and $\gamma_{21}<1.3\cdot10^{-24} (4.1\cdot10^{-24})$ GeV, for normal (inverted) mass ordering.
  • In the presence of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI), oscillation data are affected by a degeneracy which allows the solar mixing angle to be in the second octant (aka the dark side) and implies a sign flip of the atmospheric mass-squared difference. This leads to an ambiguity in the determination of the ordering of neutrino masses, one of the main goals of the current and future experimental neutrino program. We show that the recent observation of coherent neutrino--nucleus scattering by the COHERENT experiment, in combination with global oscillation data, excludes the NSI degeneracy at the $3.1\sigma$ ($3.6\sigma$) CL for NSI with up (down) quarks.
  • A variety of new physics models allows for neutrinos to up-scatter into heavier states. If the incident neutrino is energetic enough, the heavy neutrino may travel some distance before decaying. In this work, we consider the atmospheric neutrino flux as a source of such events. At IceCube, this would lead to a "double-bang" (DB) event topology, similar to what is predicted to occur for tau neutrinos at ultra-high energies. The DB event topology has an extremely low background rate from coincident atmospheric cascades, making this a distinctive signature of new physics. Our results indicate that IceCube should already be able to derive new competitive constraints on models with GeV-scale sterile neutrinos using existing data.
  • Light sterile neutrinos can be probed in a number of ways, including electroweak decays, cosmology and neutrino oscillation experiments. At long-baseline experiments, the neutral-current data is directly sensitive to the presence of light sterile neutrinos: once the active neutrinos have oscillated into a sterile state, a depletion in the neutral-current data sample is expected since they do not interact with the $Z$ boson. This channel offers a direct avenue to probe the mixing between a sterile neutrino and the tau neutrino, which remains largely unconstrained by current data. In this work, we study the potential of the DUNE experiment to constrain the mixing angle which parametrizes this mixing, $\theta_{34}$, through the observation of neutral-current events at the far detector. We find that DUNE will be able to improve significantly over current constraints thanks to its large statistics and excellent discrimination between neutral- and charged-current events.
  • If the heaviest neutrino mass eigenstate is unstable, its decay modes could include lighter neutrino eigenstates. In this case part of the decay products could be visible, as they would interact at neutrino detectors via mixing. At neutrino oscillation experiments, a characteristic signature of such \emph{visible neutrino decay} would be an apparent excess of events at low energies. We focus on a simple phenomenological model in which the heaviest neutrino decays as $\nu_3 \rightarrow \nu_{1,2} + \phi$, where $\phi$ is a new light scalar. If neutrinos are Majorana particles the helicity-flipping decays would be observable (i.e., $\nu \to \bar\nu + \phi$), leading to interesting observable consequences on the event rates. We compute the sensitivities of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) to the couplings of the new scalar as a function of the lightest neutrino mass. Under the assumption that only the heaviest neutrino is unstable, and for a normal mass ordering, we find that DUNE will be sensitive to values of $\tau_3/m_3 > 1.95 - 2.6\times 10^{-10}$~s/eV (90\% C.L.) (depending on the lightest neutrino mass), where $\tau_3$ and $m_3$ are the lifetime and mass of $\nu_3$, respectively.
  • The simplest Standard Model extension to explain neutrino masses involves the addition of right-handed neutrinos. At some level, this extension will impact neutrino oscillation searches. In this work we explore the differences and similarities between the case in which these neutrinos are kinematically accessible (sterile neutrinos) or not (mixing matrix non-unitarity). We clarify apparent inconsistencies in the present literature when using different parametrizations to describe these effects and recast both limits in the popular neutrino non-standard interaction (NSI) formalism. We find that, in the limit in which sterile oscillations are averaged out at the near detector, their effects at the far detector coincide with non-unitarity at leading order, even in presence of a matter potential. We also summarize the present bounds existing in both limits and compare them with the expected sensitivities of near future facilities taking the DUNE proposal as a benchmark. We conclude that non-unitarity effects are too constrained to impact present or near future neutrino oscillation facilities but that sterile neutrinos can play an important role at long baseline experiments. The role of the near detector is also discussed in detail.
  • In presence of non-standard neutrino interactions the neutrino flavor evolution equation is affected by a degeneracy which leads to the so-called LMA-Dark solution. It requires a solar mixing angle in the second octant and implies an ambiguity in the neutrino mass ordering. Non-oscillation experiments are required to break this degeneracy. We perform a combined analysis of data from oscillation experiments with the neutrino scattering experiments CHARM and NuTeV. We find that the degeneracy can be lifted if the non-standard neutrino interactions take place with down quarks, but it remains for up quarks. However, CHARM and NuTeV constraints apply only if the new interactions take place through mediators not much lighter than the electroweak scale. For light mediators we consider the possibility to resolve the degeneracy by using data from future coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering experiments. We find that, for an experiment using a stopped-pion neutrino source, the LMA-Dark degeneracy will either be resolved, or the presence of new interactions in the neutrino sector will be established with high significance.
  • We consider the impact of neutral-current (NC) non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI) on the determination of the neutrino mass ordering. We show that in presence of NSI there is an exact degeneracy which makes it impossible to determine the neutrino mass ordering and the octant of the solar mixing angle $\theta_{12}$ at oscillation experiments. The degeneracy holds at the probability level and for arbitrary matter density profiles, and hence, solar, atmospheric, reactor, and accelerator neutrino experiments are affected simultaneously. The degeneracy requires order-one corrections from NSI to the NC neutrino--quark interaction and can be tested in neutrino--nucleus NC scattering experiments.
  • Andreas S. Kronfeld, Robert S. Tschirhart, Usama Al-Binni, Wolfgang Altmannshofer, Charles Ankenbrandt, Kaladi Babu, Sunanda Banerjee, Matthew Bass, Brian Batell, David V. Baxter, Zurab Berezhiani, Marc Bergevin, Robert Bernstein, Sudeb Bhattacharya, Mary Bishai, Thomas Blum, S. Alex Bogacz, Stephen J. Brice, Joachim Brod, Alan Bross, Michael Buchoff, Thomas W. Burgess, Marcela Carena, Luis A. Castellanos, Subhasis Chattopadhyay, Mu-Chun Chen, Daniel Cherdack, Norman H. Christ, Tim Chupp, Vincenzo Cirigliano, Pilar Coloma, Christopher E. Coppola, Ramanath Cowsik, J. Allen Crabtree, André de Gouvêa, Jean-Pierre Delahaye, Dmitri Denisov, Patrick deNiverville, Ranjan Dharmapalan, Markus Diefenthaler, Alexander Dolgov, Georgi Dvali, Estia Eichten, Jürgen Engelfried, Phillip D. Ferguson, Tony Gabriel, Avraham Gal, Franz Gallmeier, Kenneth S. Ganezer, Susan Gardner, Douglas Glenzinski, Stephen Godfrey, Elena S. Golubeva, Stefania Gori, Van B. Graves, Geoffrey Greene, Cory L. Griffard, Ulrich Haisch, Thomas Handler, Brandon Hartfiel, Athanasios Hatzikoutelis, Ayman Hawari, Lawrence Heilbronn, James E. Hill, Patrick Huber, David E. Jaffe, Xiaodong Jiang, Christian Johnson, Yuri Kamyshkov, Daniel M. Kaplan, Boris Kerbikov, Brendan Kiburg, Harold G. Kirk, Andreas Klein, Kyle Knoepfel, Boris Kopeliovich, Vladimir Kopeliovich, Joachim Kopp, Wolfgang Korsch, Graham Kribs, Ronald Lipton, Chen-Yu Liu, Wolfgang Lorenzon, Zheng-Tian Lu, Naomi C. R. Makins, David McKeen, Geoffrey Mills, Michael Mocko, Rabindra Mohapatra, Nikolai V. Mokhov, Guenter Muhrer, Pieter Mumm, David Neuffer, Lev Okun, Mark A. Palmer, Robert Palmer, Robert W. Pattie Jr., David G. Phillips II, Kevin Pitts, Maxim Pospelov, Vitaly S. Pronskikh, Chris Quigg, Erik Ramberg, Amlan Ray, Paul E. Reimer, David G. Richards, Adam Ritz, Amit Roy, Arthur Ruggles, Robert Ryne, Utpal Sarkar, Andy Saunders, Yannis K. Semertzidis, Anatoly Serebrov, Hirohiko Shimizu, Robert Shrock, Arindam K. Sikdar, Pavel V. Snopok, William M. Snow, Aria Soha, Stefan Spanier, Sergei Striganov, Zhaowen Tang, Lawrence Townsend, Jon Urheim, Arkady Vainshtein, Richard Van de Water, Ruth S. Van de Water, Richard J. Van Kooten, Bernard Wehring, William C. Wester III, Lisa Whitehead, Robert J. Wilson, Elizabeth Worcester, Albert R. Young, Geralyn Zeller
    Part 2 of "Project X: Accelerator Reference Design, Physics Opportunities, Broader Impacts". In this Part, we outline the particle-physics program that can be achieved with Project X, a staged superconducting linac for intensity-frontier particle physics. Topics include neutrino physics, kaon physics, muon physics, electric dipole moments, neutron-antineutron oscillations, new light particles, hadron structure, hadron spectroscopy, and lattice-QCD calculations. Part 1 is available as arXiv:1306.5022 [physics.acc-ph] and Part 3 is available as arXiv:1306.5024 [physics.acc-ph].
  • We show that, in $U(1)_R$-symmetric supersymmetric models, the bino and its Dirac partner (the singlino) can play the role of right-handed neutrinos and generate the neutrino masses and mixing, without the need for traditional bilinear or trilinear R-parity violating operators. The two particles form a pseudo-Dirac pair, the `bi$\nu$o'. An Inverse Seesaw texture is generated for the neutrino-bi$\nu$o sector, and the lightest neutrino is predicted to be massless. Unlike in most models with heavy right-handed neutrinos, the bi$\nu$o can be sizably produced at the LHC through its interactions with colored particles, while respecting low energy constraints from neutrinoless double-beta decay and charged lepton flavor violation.
  • In this work we combine information from relic abundance, direct detection, cosmic microwave background, positron fraction, gamma rays, and colliders to explore the existing constraints on couplings between Dark Matter and Standard Model constituents when no underlying model or correlation is assumed. For definiteness, we include independent vector-like effective interactions for each Standard Model fermion. Our results show that low Dark Matter masses below 20 GeV are disfavoured at the $3 \sigma$ level with respect to higher masses, due to the tension between the relic abundance requirement and upper constraints on the Dark Matter couplings. Furthermore, large couplings are typically only allowed in combinations which avoid effective couplings to the nuclei used in direct detection experiments.
  • In this letter, we analyze for the first time the physics reach in terms of sensitivity to leptonic CP violation of the proposed MuOn-decay MEdium baseline NeuTrino beam (MOMENT) experiment, a novel neutrino oscillation facility that would operate with neutrinos from muon decay. Apart from obtaining a sufficiently intense flux, the bottlenecks to the physics reach of this experiment will be achieving a high enough suppression of the atmospheric background and, particularly, attaining a sufficient level of charge identification. We thus present our results as a function of these two factors. As for the detector, we consider a very massive Gd-doped Water Cherenkov detector. We find that MOMENT will be competitive with other currently planned future oscillation experiments if a charge identification of at least 80 % can be achieved at the same time that the atmospheric background can be suppressed by at least a factor of ten. We also find a large synergy of MOMENT with the current generation of neutrino oscillation experiments, T2K and NOvA, which significantly enhances its final sensitivity.
  • We study the sensitivity of current and future long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments to the effects of dimension six operators affecting neutrino propagation through Earth, commonly referred to as Non-Standard Interactions (NSI). All relevant parameters entering the oscillation probabilities (standard and non-standard) are considered at once, in order to take into account possible cancellations and degeneracies between them. We find that the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment will significantly improve over current constraints for most NSI parameters. Most notably, it will be able to rule out the so-called LMA-dark solution, still compatible with current oscillation data, and will be sensitive to off-diagonal NSI parameters at the level of $\varepsilon \sim \mathcal{O}(0.05 - 0.5)$. We also identify two degeneracies among standard and non-standard parameters, which could be partially resolved by combining T2HK and DUNE data.
  • The CMS $e^+ e^- jj$ events of invariant mass near 2 TeV are consistent with a $W'$ boson decaying into an electron and a right-handed neutrino whose TeV-scale mass is of the Dirac type. We show that the Dirac partner of the right-handed electron-neutrino can be the right-handed tau-neutrino. A prediction of this model is that the sum of the $\tau^+ e^+ jj$ and $\tau^- e^- jj$ signal cross sections equals twice that for $e^+ e^- jj$. The Standard Model neutrinos acquire Majorana masses and mixings compatible with neutrino oscillation data.
  • High-intensity neutrino beam facilities may produce a beam of light dark matter when protons strike the target. Searches for such a dark matter beam using its scattering in a nearby detector must overcome the large neutrino background. We characterize the spatial and energy distributions of the dark matter and neutrino beams, focusing on their differences to enhance the sensitivity to dark matter. We find that a dark matter beam produced by a $Z'$ boson in the GeV mass range is both broader and more energetic than the neutrino beam. The reach for dark matter is maximized for a detector sensitive to hard neutral-current scatterings, placed at a sizable angle off the neutrino beam axis. In the case of the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), a detector placed at roughly 6 degrees off axis and at a distance of about 200 m from the target would be sensitive to $Z'$ couplings as low as 0.05. This search can proceed symbiotically with neutrino measurements. We also show that the MiniBooNE and MicroBooNE detectors, which are on Fermilab's Booster beamline, happen to be at an optimal angle from the NuMI beam and could perform searches with existing data. This illustrates potential synergies between LBNF and the short-baseline neutrino program if the detectors are positioned appropriately.
  • In the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments, aiming to determine the charge-parity violating phase $\delta_{CP}$ in the appearance channel, fine-grained time-projection chambers are expected to play an important role. In this Letter, we analyze an influence of realistic detector capabilities on the $\delta_{CP}$ sensitivity for a setup similar to that of the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment. We find that the effect of the missing energy, carried out by undetected particles, is sizable. Although the reconstructed neutrino energy can be corrected for the missing energy, the accuracy of such procedure has to exceed 20\%, to avoid a sizable bias in the extracted $\delta_{CP}$ value.
  • To be able to achieve their physics goals, future neutrino-oscillation experiments will need to reconstruct the neutrino energy with very high accuracy. In this work, we analyze how the energy reconstruction may be affected by realistic detection capabilities, such as energy resolutions, efficiencies, and thresholds. This allows us to estimate how well the detector performance needs to be determined a priori in order to avoid a sizable bias in the measurement of the relevant oscillation parameters. We compare the kinematic and calorimetric methods of energy reconstruction in the context of two muon-neutrino disappearance experiments operating in different energy regimes. For the calorimetric reconstruction method, we find that the detector performance has to be estimated with a ~10% accuracy to avoid a significant bias in the extracted oscillation parameters. On the other hand, in the case of kinematic energy reconstruction, we observe that the results exhibit less sensitivity to an overestimation of the detector capabilities.
  • We address the validity of the usual procedure to determine the sensitivity of neutrino oscillation experiments to CP violation. An explicit calibration of the test statistic is performed through Monte Carlo simulations for several experimental setups. We find that significant deviations from a $\chi^2$ distribution with one degree of freedom occur for experimental setups with low sensitivity to $\delta$. In particular, when the allowed region to which $\delta$ is constrained at a given confidence level is comparable to the whole allowed range, the cyclic nature of the variable manifests and the premises of Wilk's theorem are violated. This leads to values of the test statistic significantly lower than a $\chi^2$ distribution at that confidence level. On the other hand, for facilities which can place better constraints on $\delta$ the cyclic nature of the variable is hidden and, as the potential of the facility improves, the values of the test statistics first become slightly higher than and then approach asymptotically a $\chi^2$ distribution. The role of sign degeneracies is also discussed.
  • In this letter we point out the possibility to study new physics in the neutrino sector using dark matter detectors based on liquid xenon. These are characterized by very good spatial resolution and extremely low thresholds for electron recoil energies. When combined with a radioactive $\nu_e$ source, both features in combination allow for a very competitive sensitivity to neutrino magnetic moments and sterile neutrino oscillations. We find that, for realistic values of detector size and source strength, the bound on the neutrino magnetic moment can be improved by an order of magnitude with respect to the present value. Regarding sterile neutrino searches, we find that most of the gallium anomaly could be explored at the 95% confidence level just using shape information.
  • The ESS$\nu$SB project is a proposed neutrino oscillation experiment based on the European Spallation Source with the search for leptonic CP as its main aim. In this letter we show that a near detector at around 1 km distance from the beamline is not only very desirable for keeping the systematic errors affecting the CP search under control, but would also provide a significant sensitivity probe for sterile neutrino oscillations in the region of the parameter space favored by the long-standing LSND anomaly. We find that the effective mixing angle $\theta_{\mu e}$ can be probed down to $\sin^2(2\theta_{\mu e}) \simeq 2(8)\cdot 10^{-3}$ at $5\sigma$ assuming 15% bin-to-bin (un)correlated systematics.
  • We discuss how the CP violating phase $\delta$ and the mixing angle $\theta_{23}$ can be measured precisely in an environment where there are strong correlations between them. This is achieved by paying special attention to the mutual roles and the interplay between the appearance and the disappearance channels in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. We analyze and clarify the general structure of the $\theta_{23} - \theta_{13} - \delta$ degeneracy for both the appearance and disappearance channels in a more complete fashion than what has previously been discussed in the literature. A full understanding of this degeneracy is of vital importance if $\theta_{23}$ is close to maximal mixing. The relative importance between the appearance and disappearance channels depends upon the particular setup and how close to maximal mixing Nature has chosen the value for $\theta_{23}$. For facilities that operate with a narrow band beam or a wide band beam centered on the first oscillation extremum, the contribution of the disappearance channel depends critically on the systematic uncertainties assumed for this channel. Whereas for facilities that operate at energies above the first oscillation extremum or at the second oscillation extremum the appearance channels dominate. On the other hand, for $\delta$ we find that the disappearance channel usually improves the sensitivity, modestly for facilities around the first oscillation extremum and more significantly for facilities operating at an energy above the first oscillation extremum, especially near $\delta \sim \pm \pi/2$.
  • In neutrino oscillation experiments, neutrino interactions at the detector are simulated using event generators which attempt to reflect our understanding of nuclear physics. We study the impact of different neutrino interactions and nuclear models on the determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. We use two independent neutrino event generators, GENIE and GiBUU, and apply them to a setup with a conventional neutrino beam aiming at a water \v{C}erenkov detector, for which only the QE-like sample is selected. Subsequently, we perform a fit to the oscillation parameters in the $\nu_\mu$ disappearance channel.
  • Determining the type of the neutrino mass ordering (normal versus inverted) is one of the most important open questions in neutrino physics. In this paper we clarify the statistical interpretation of sensitivity calculations for this measurement. We employ standard frequentist methods of hypothesis testing in order to precisely define terms like the median sensitivity of an experiment. We consider a test statistic $T$ which in a certain limit will be normal distributed. We show that the median sensitivity in this limit is very close to standard sensitivities based on $\Delta\chi^2$ values from a data set without statistical fluctuations, such as widely used in the literature. Furthermore, we perform an explicit Monte Carlo simulation of the INO, JUNO, LBNE, NOvA, and PINGU experiments in order to verify the validity of the Gaussian limit, and provide a comparison of the expected sensitivities for those experiments.
  • We investigate the minimal performance, in terms of beam luminosity and detector size, of a neutrino factory to achieve a competitive physics reach for the determination of the mass hierarchy and the discovery of leptonic CP violation. We find that a low luminosity of $2\times 10^{20}$ useful muon decays per year and 5 GeV muon energy aimed at a 10 kton magnetized liquid argon detector placed at 1300 km from the source provides a good starting point. This result relies on $\theta_{13}$ being large and assumes that the so-called platinum channel can be used effectively. We find that such a minimal facility would perform significantly better than phase I of the LBNE project and thus could constitute a reasonable step towards a full neutrino factory.
  • We evaluate the probability of future neutrino oscillation facilities to discover leptonic CP violation and/or measure the neutrino mass hierarchy. We study how this probability is affected by positive or negative hints for these observables to be found at T2K and NOvA. We consider the following facilities: LBNE; T2HK; and the 10 GeV Neutrino Factory (NF10), and show how their discovery probabilities change with the running time of T2K and NOvA conditioned to their results. We find that, if after 15 years T2K and NOvA have not observed a 90% CL hint of CP violation, then LBNE and T2HK have less than a 10% chance of achieving a 5sigma discovery, whereas NF10 still has a ca 40% chance to do so. Conversely, if T2K and NOvA have an early 90% CL hint in 5 years from now, T2HK has a rather large chance to achieve a 5sigma CP violation discovery (75% or 55%, depending on whether the mass hierarchy is known or not). This is to be compared with the 90% (30%) probability that NF10 (LBNE) would have to observe the same signal at 5sigma. A hierarchy measurement at 5sigma is achievable at both LBNE and NF10 with more than 90% probability, irrespectively of the outcome of T2K and NOvA. We also find that if LBNE or a similar very long baseline super-beam is the only next generation facility to be built, then it is very useful to continue running T2K and NOvA (or at least T2K) beyond their original schedule in order to increase the CP violation discovery chances, given their complementarity.