• We present the discovery and measurements of a gravitationally lensed supernova (SN) behind the galaxy cluster MOO J1014+0038. Based on multi-band Hubble Space Telescope and Very Large Telescope (VLT) photometry of the supernova, and VLT spectroscopy of the host galaxy, we find a 97.5% probability that this SN is a SN Ia, and a 2.5% chance of a CC SN. Our typing algorithm combines the shape and color of the light curve with the expected rates of each SN type in the host galaxy. With a redshift of 2.2216, this is the highest redshift SN Ia discovered with a spectroscopic host-galaxy redshift. A further distinguishing feature is that the lensing cluster, at redshift 1.23, is the most distant to date to have an amplified SN. The SN lies in the middle of the color and light-curve shape distributions found at lower redshift, disfavoring strong evolution to z = 2.22. We estimate an amplification due to gravitational lensing of 2.8+0.6-0.5 (1.10 +- 0.23 mag)---compatible with the value estimated from the weak-lensing-derived mass and the mass-concentration relation from LambdaCDM simulations---making it the most amplified SN Ia discovered behind a galaxy cluster.
  • The possibility of linking inflation and late cosmic accelerated expansion using the $\alpha$-attractor models has received increasing attention due to their physical motivation. In the early universe, $\alpha$-attractors provide an inflationary mechanism compatible with Planck satellite CMB observations and predictive for future gravitational wave CMB modes. Additionally $\alpha$-attractors can be written as quintessence models with a potential that connects a power law regime with a plateau or uplifted exponential, allowing a late cosmic accelerated expansion that can mimic behavior near a cosmological constant. In this paper we study a generalized dark energy $\alpha$-attractor model. We thoroughly investigate its phenomenology, including the role of all model parameters and the possibility of large-scale tachyonic instability clustering. We verify the relation that $1+w\sim 1/\alpha$ (while the gravitational wave power $r\sim\alpha$) so these models predict that a signature should appear in either the primordial B-modes or in late time deviation from a cosmological constant. We constrain the model parameters with current datasets, including the cosmic microwave background (Planck 2015 compressed likelihood), baryon acoustic oscillations (BOSS DR12) and supernovae (Pantheon compressed). Our results show that expansion histories close to a cosmological constant exist in large regions of the parameter space, not requiring a fine-tuning of the parameters or initial conditions.
  • Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of carbon-oxygen white dwarfs. Though the uniformity of their light curves makes them powerful cosmological distance indicators, long-standing issues remain regarding their progenitors and explosion mechanisms. Recent detection of the early ultraviolet pulse of a peculiar subluminous SN Ia has been claimed as new evidence for the companion-ejecta interaction through the single-degenerate channel. Here, we report the discovery of a prominent but red optical flash at $\sim$ 0.5 days after the explosion of a SN Ia which shows hybrid features of different SN Ia sub-classes: a light curve typical of normal-brightness SNe Ia, but with strong titanium absorptions, commonly seen in the spectra of subluminous ones. We argue that the early flash of such a hybrid SN Ia is different from predictions of previously suggested scenarios such as the companion-ejecta interaction. Instead it can be naturally explained by a SN explosion triggered by a detonation of a thin helium shell either on a near-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf ($\gtrsim$ 1.3 M$_{\odot}$) with low-yield $^{56}$Ni or on a sub-Chandrasekhar-mass white dwarf ($\sim$ 1.0 M$_{\odot}$) merging with a less massive white dwarf. This finding provides compelling evidence that one branch of the previously proposed explosion models, the helium-ignition scenario, does exist in nature, and such a scenario may account for explosions of white dwarfs in a wider mass range in contrast to what was previously supposed.
  • We study the light curve of SN 1604 using the historical data collected at the time of observation of the outburst. Comparing the supernova with recent SNe Ia of various rates of decline after maximum light, we find that this event looks like a normal SNIa (stretch s close to 0.9: 0.9 \pm 0.13), a fact which is also favoured by the late light curve. The supernova is heavily obscured by 2.7 \pm 0.1 magnitudes in V. We obtain an estimate of the distance to the explosion with a value of d = 5 \pm 0.7 kpc. This can help to settle ongoing discussions on the distance to the supernova. It also shows that this supernova is of the same kind as those of the SNIa sets that we use for cosmology nowadays.
  • We present charm (cosmic history agnostic reconstruction method), a novel inference algorithm that reconstructs the cosmic expansion history as encoded in the Hubble parameter $H(z)$ from SNe Ia data. The novelty of the approach lies in the usage of information field theory, a statistical field theory that is very well suited for the construction of optimal signal recovery algorithms. The charm algorithm infers non-parametrically $s(a)=\ln(\rho(a)/\rho_{\mathrm{crit}0})$, the density evolution which determines $H(z)$, without assuming an analytical form of $\rho(a)$ but only its smoothness with the scale factor $a=(1+z)^{-1}$. The inference problem of recovering the signal $s(a)$ from the data is formulated in a fully Bayesian way. In detail, we have rewritten the signal as the sum of a background cosmology and a perturbation. This allows us to determine the maximum a posteriory estimate of the signal by an iterative Wiener filter method. Applying charm to the Union2.1 supernova compilation, we have recovered a cosmic expansion history that is fully compatible with the standard $\Lambda$CDM cosmological expansion history with parameter values consistent with the results of the Planck mission.
  • We analyze a time series of optical spectra of SN~2014J from almost two weeks prior to maximum to nearly four months after maximum. We perform our analysis using the SYNOW code, which is well suited to track the distribution of the ions with velocity in the ejecta. We show that almost all of the spectral features during the entire epoch can be identified with permitted transitions of the common ions found in normal SNe Ia in agreement with previous studies. We show that 2014J is a relatively normal SN Ia. At early times the spectral features are dominated by Si II, S II, Mg II, and Ca II. These ions persist to maximum light with the appearance of Na I and Mg I. At later times iron-group elements also appear, as expected in the stratified abundance model of the formation of normal type Ia SNe. We do not find significant spectroscopic evidence for oxygen, until 100 days after maximum light. The +100 day identification of oxygen is tentative, and would imply significant mixing of unburned or only slight processed elements down to a velocity of 6,000 km/s. Our results are in relatively good agreement with other analyses in the IR. We briefly compare SN 2011fe to SN 2014J and conclude that the differences could be due to different central densities at ignition or differences in the C/O ratio of the progenitors.
  • There has been much debate about the origin of the diffuse $\gamma$--ray background in the MeV range. At lower energies, AGNs and Seyfert galaxies can explain the background, but not above $\simeq$0.3 MeV. Beyond $\sim$10 MeV blazars appear to account for the flux observed. That leaves an unexplained gap for which different candidates have been proposed, including annihilations of WIMPS. One candidate are Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Early studies concluded that they were able to account for the $\gamma$--ray background in the gap, while later work attributed a significantly lower contribution to them. All those estimates were based on SN Ia explosion models which did not reflect the full 3D hydrodynamics of SNe Ia explosions. In addition, new measurements obtained since 2010 have provided new, direct estimates of high-z SNe Ia rates beyond $z\sim$2. We take into account these new advances to see the predicted contribution to the gamma--ray background. We use here a wide variety of explosion models and a plethora of new measurements of SNe Ia rates. SNe Ia still fall short of the observed background. Only for a fit, which would imply $\sim$150\% systematic error in detecting SNe Ia events, do the theoretical predictions approach the observed fluxes. This fit is, however, at odds at the highest redshifts with recent SN Ia rates estimates. Other astrophysical sources such as FSRQs do match the observed flux levels in the MeV regime, while SNe Ia make up to 30--50\% of the observed flux.
  • Type Ia supernovae are thought to occur as a white dwarf made of carbon and oxygen accretes sufficient mass to trigger a thermonuclear explosion$^{1}$. The accretion could occur slowly from an unevolved (main-sequence) or evolved (subgiant or giant) star$^{2,3}$, that being dubbed the single-degenerate channel, or rapidly as it breaks up a smaller orbiting white dwarf (the double- degenerate channel)$^{3,4}$. Obviously, a companion will survive the explosion only in the single-degenerate channel$^{5}$. Both channels might contribute to the production of type Ia supernovae$^{6,7}$ but their relative proportions still remain a fundamental puzzle in astronomy. Previous searches for remnant companions have revealed one possible case for SN 1572$^{8,9}$, though that has been criticized$^{10}$. More recently, observations have restricted surviving companions to be small, main-sequence stars$^{11,12,13}$, ruling out giant companions, though still allowing the single-degenerate channel. Here we report the result of a search for surviving companions to the progenitor of SN 1006$^{14}$. None of the stars within 4' of the apparent site of the explosion is associated with the supernova remnant, so we can firmly exclude all giant and subgiant companions to the progenitor. Combined with the previous results, less than 20 per cent of type Iae occur through the single degenerate channel.
  • New constraints on inhomogeneous Lema\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) models alternative to Dark Energy are presented, focusing on adiabatic profiles with space-independent Big Bang and baryon fraction. The Baryon Acoustic Oscillation (BAO) scale at early times is computed in terms of the asymptotic value and then projected to different redshifts by following the geodesics of the background metric. Additionally, a model-independent method to constraint the local expansion rate using a prior on supernovae luminosity is presented. Cosmologies described by an adiabatic GBH matter profile with \Omega_{out}=1 and \Omega_{out}\leq 1 are investigated using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis including the latest BAO data from the WiggleZ collaboration and the local expansion rate from the Hubble Space Telescope, together with Union-II type Ia supernovae data and the position and height of the Cosmic Microwave Background acoustic peaks. The addition of BAO data at higher redshifts increases considerably their constraining power and represents a new drawback for this type of models, yielding a value of the local density parameter \Omega_{in}>0.2 which is 3\sigma apart from the value \Omega_{in}<0.15 found using supernovae. The situation does not improve if the asymptotic flatness assumption is dropped, and a Bayesian analysis shows that constrained GBH models are ruled out at high confidence. We emphasize that these are purely geometric probes, that only recently have become sufficiently constraining to independently rule out the whole class of adiabatic LTB models.
  • Xiaofeng Wang, Lifan Wang, Alexei V. Filippenko, Eddie Baron, Markus Kromer, Dennis Jack, Tianmeng Zhang, Greg Aldering, Pierre Antilogus, David Arnett, Dietrich Baade, Brian J. Barris, Stefano Benetti, Patrice Bouchet, Adam S. Burrows, Ramon Canal, Enrico Cappellaro, Raymond Carlberg, Elisa di Carlo, Peter Challis, Arlin Crotts, John I. Danziger, Massimo Della Valle, Michael Fink, Ryan J. Foley, Claes Fransson, Avishay Gal-Yam, Peter Garnavich, Chris L. Gerardy, Gerson Goldhaber, Mario Hamuy, Wolfgang Hillebrandt, Peter A. Hoeflich, Stephen T. Holland, Daniel E. Holz, John P. Hughes, David J. Jeffery, Saurabh W. Jha, Dan Kasen, Alexei M. Khokhlov, Robert P. Kirshner, Robert Knop, Cecilia Kozma, Kevin Krisciunas, Brian C. Lee, Bruno Leibundgut, Eric J. Lentz, Douglas C. Leonard, Walter H. G. Lewin, Weidong Li, Mario Livio, Peter Lundqvist, Dan Maoz, Thomas Matheson, Paolo Mazzali, Peter Meikle, Gajus Miknaitis, Peter Milne, Stefan Mochnacki, Ken'Ichi Nomoto, Peter E. Nugent, Elaine Oran, Nino Panagia, Saul Perlmutter, Mark M. Phillips, Philip Pinto, Dovi Poznanski, Christopher J. Pritchet, Martin Reinecke, Adam Riess, Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, Richard Scalzo, Eric M. Schlegel, Brian Schmidt, James Siegrist, Alicia M. Soderberg, Jesper Sollerman, George Sonneborn, Anthony Spadafora, Jason Spyromilio, Richard A. Sramek, Sumner G. Starrfield, Louis G. Strolger, Nicholas B. Suntzeff, Rollin Thomas, John L. Tonry, Amedeo Tornambe, James W. Truran, Massimo Turatto, Michael Turner, Schuyler D. Van Dyk, Kurt Weiler, J. Craig Wheeler, Michael Wood-Vasey, Stan Woosley, Hitoshi Yamaoka
    Feb. 6, 2012 astro-ph.CO, astro-ph.HE
    We present ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy and photometry of four Type Ia supernovae (SNe 2004dt, 2004ef, 2005M, and 2005cf) obtained with the UV prism of the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. This dataset provides unique spectral time series down to 2000 Angstrom. Significant diversity is seen in the near maximum-light spectra (~ 2000--3500 Angstrom) for this small sample. The corresponding photometric data, together with archival data from Swift Ultraviolet/Optical Telescope observations, provide further evidence of increased dispersion in the UV emission with respect to the optical. The peak luminosities measured in uvw1/F250W are found to correlate with the B-band light-curve shape parameter dm15(B), but with much larger scatter relative to the correlation in the broad-band B band (e.g., ~0.4 mag versus ~0.2 mag for those with 0.8 < dm15 < 1.7 mag). SN 2004dt is found as an outlier of this correlation (at > 3 sigma), being brighter than normal SNe Ia such as SN 2005cf by ~0.9 mag and ~2.0 mag in the uvw1/F250W and uvm2/F220W filters, respectively. We show that different progenitor metallicity or line-expansion velocities alone cannot explain such a large discrepancy. Viewing-angle effects, such as due to an asymmetric explosion, may have a significant influence on the flux emitted in the UV region. Detailed modeling is needed to disentangle and quantify the above effects.
  • We present an analysis of the chemical abundances of the star Tycho G in the direction of the remnant of supernova (SN) 1572, based on Keck high-resolution optical spectra. The stellar parameters of this star are found to be those of a G-type subgiant with $T_{\mathrm{eff}} = 5900 \pm 100$ K, \loggl $ = 3.85 \pm 0.30$ dex, and $\mathrm{[Fe/H]} = -0.05 \pm 0.09$. This determination agrees with the stellar parameters derived for the star in a previous survey for the possible companion star of SN 1572 (Ruiz-Lapuente et al. 2004). The chemical abundances follow the Galactic trends, except for Ni, which is overabundant relative to Fe, $[{\rm Ni/Fe}] $ $=$ 0.16 $\pm$ 0.04. Co is slightly overabundant (at a low significance level). These enhancements in Fe-peak elements could have originated from pollution by the supernova ejecta. We find a surprisingly high Li abundance for a star that has evolved away from the main sequence. We discuss these findings in the context of companion stars of supernovae.
  • We investigate the equation of state w(z) in a non-parametric form using the latest compilations of distance luminosity from SNe Ia at high z. We combine the inverse problem approach with a Monte Carlo to scan the space of priors. On the light of these high redshift supernova data sets, we reconstruct w(z). A comparison between a sample including the latest results at z>1 and a sample without those results show the improvement achieved by observations of very high z supernovae. We present the prospects to measure the variation of dark energy density along z by this method.
  • The discovery of the acceleration of the rate of expansion of the Universe fosters new explorations of the behavior of gravitation theories in the cosmological context. Either the GR framework is valid but a cosmic component with a negative equation of state is dominating the energy--matter contents or the Universe is better described at large by a theory that departs from GR. In this review we address theoretical alternatives that have been explored through supernovae.
  • A model--independent approach to dark energy is here developed by considering the determination of its equation of state as an inverse problem. The reconstruction of w(z) as a non--parametric function using the current SNe Ia data is explored. It is investigated as well how results would improve when considering other samples of cosmic distance indicators at higher redshift. This approach reveals the lack of information in the present samples to conclude on the behavior of w(z) at z > 0.6. At low level of significance a preference is found for w_{0} < -1 and w'(z) > 0 at z ~ 0.2--0.3. The solution of w(z) along redshift never departs more than 1.95\sigma from the cosmological constant w(z)=-1, and this only occurs when using various cosmic distance indicators. The determination of w(z) as a function is readdressed considering samples of large number of SNe Ia as those to be provided by SNAP. It is found an improvement in the resolution of w(z) when using those synthetic samples, which is favored by adding data at very high z. Though the set of degenerate solutions compatible with the data can be retrieved through this method, these degeneracies in the solution will difficult the physical interpretation of the results. Through this approach, we have explored as well the gain in information in w(z) and the quality of the inversion achieved using different data sets of cosmic distance indicators.
  • The brightness of type Ia supernovae, and their homogeneity as a class, makes them powerful tools in cosmology, yet little is known about the progenitor systems of these explosions. They are thought to arise when a white dwarf accretes matter from a companion star, is compressed and undergoes a thermonuclear explosion Unless the companion star is another white dwarf (in which case it should be destroyed by the mass-transfer process itself), it should survive and show distinguishing properties. Tycho's supernova is one of the only two type Ia supernovae observed in our Galaxy, and so provides an opportunity to address observationally the identification of the surviving companion. Here we report a survey of the central region of its remnant, around the position of the explosion, which excludes red giants as the mass donor of the exploding white dwarf. We found a type G0--G2 star, similar to our Sun in surface temperature and luminosity (but lower surface gravity), moving at more than three times the mean velocity of the stars at that distance, which appears to be the surviving companion of the supernova.
  • Within the Quantum Field Theory context the idea of a "cosmological constant" (CC) evolving with time looks quite natural as it just reflects the change of the vacuum energy with the typical energy of the universe. In the particular frame of Ref.[30], a "running CC" at low energies may arise from generic quantum effects near the Planck scale, M_P, provided there is a smooth decoupling of all massive particles below M_P. In this work we further develop the cosmological consequences of a "running CC" by addressing the accelerated evolution of the universe within that model. The rate of change of the CC stays slow, without fine-tuning, and is comparable to H^2 M_P^2. It can be described by a single parameter, \nu, that can be determined from already planned experiments using SNe Ia at high z. The range of allowed values for \nu follow mainly from nucleosynthesis restrictions. Present samples of SNe Ia can not yet distinguish between a "constant" CC or a "running" one. The numerical simulations presented in this work show that SNAP can probe the predicted variation of the CC either ruling out this idea or confirming the evolution hereafter expected.
  • We construct a semiclassical FLRW cosmological model assuming a running cosmological constant (CC). It turns out that the CC becomes variable at arbitrarily low energies due to the remnant quantum effects of the heaviest particles, e.g. the Planck scale physics. These effects are universal in the sense that they lead to a low-energy structure common to a large class of high-energy theories. Remarkably, the uncertainty concerning the unknown high-energy dynamics is accumulated into a single parameter \nu, such that the model has an essential predictive power. Future Type Ia supernovae experiments (like SNAP) can verify whether this framework is correct. For the flat FLRW case and a moderate value \nu ~0.01, we predict an increase of 10-20% in the value of Omega_{Lambda} at redshifts z=1-1.5 perfectly reachable by SNAP.
  • The light curve of SN 1572 is described in the terms used nowadays to characterize SNeIa. By assembling the records of the observations done in 1572--74 and evaluating their uncertainties, it is possible to recover the light curve and the color evolution of this supernova. It is found that, within the SNe Ia family, the event should have been a SNIa with a normal rate of decline, its stretch factor being {\it s} $\sim$ 0.9. Visual light curve near maximum, late--time decline and the color evolution sustain this conclusion. After correcting for extinction, the luminosity of this supernova is found to be M$_{V}$ $=$ --19.58 --5 log (D/3.5 kpc) $\pm$ 0.42.
  • We present U,B,V,R_C,and I_C photometry of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021004 taken at the Nordic Optical Telescope between approximately eight hours and 30 days after the burst. This data is combined with an analysis of the 87 ksec Chandra X-ray observations of GRB 021004 taken at a mean epoch of 33 hours after the burst to investigate the nature of this GRB. We find an intrinsic spectral slope at optical wavelengths of beta_UH = 0.39 +/- 0.12 and an X-ray slope of beta_X = 0.94 +/- 0.03. There is no evidence for colour evolution between 8.5 hours and 5.5 days after the burst. The optical decay becomes steeper approximately five days after the burst. This appears to be a gradual break due to the onset of sideways expansion in a collimated outflow. Our data suggest that the extra-galactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is between A_V = 0.3 and A_V = 0.5 and has an extinction law similar to that of the Small Magellanic Cloud. The optical and X-ray data are consistent with a relativistic fireball with the shocked electrons being in the slow cooling regime and having an electron index of p = 1.9 +/- 0.1. The burst occurred in an ambient medium that is homogeneous on scales larger than approximately 10e18 cm but inhomogeneous on smaller scales. The mean particle density is similar to what is seen for other bursts (0.1 < n < 100 cm^{-3}). Our results support the idea that the brightening seen approximately 0.1 days was due to interaction with a clumpy ambient medium within 10^{17} and 10^{18} cm of the progenitor. The agreement between the predicted optical decay and that observed approximately ten minutes after the burst suggests that the physical mechanism controlling the observed flux approximately ten minutes is the same as the one operating at t > 0.5 days.
  • We have obtained photometry and spectra of SN~1991T which extend more than 1000 days past maximum light, by far the longest a SN~Ia has been followed. Although SN~1991T exhibited nearly normal photometric behavior in the first 400 days following maximum, by 600 days its decline had slowed, and by 950~days the supernova brightness was consistent with a constant apparent magnitude of $m_B=21.30$. Spectra near maximum showed minor variations on the SN~Ia theme which grew less conspicuous during the exponential decline. At 270 days the nebular spectrum was composed of Fe and Co lines common to SNe~Ia. However, by 750 days past maximum light, these lines had shifted in wavelength, and were superimposed on a strong blue continuum. The luminosity of SN~1991T at 950 days is more than $9.0\times10^{38}(D/13~{\rm Mpc})^2$~ergs~s$^{-1}$ with a rate of decline of less than $0.04$ mags/100~days. We show that this emission is likely to be light that was emitted by SN~1991T near maximum light which has reflected from foreground dust, much like the light echos observed around SN~1987A.