• We show that any one-counter automaton with $n$ states, if its language is non-empty, accepts some word of length at most $O(n^2)$. This closes the gap between the previously known upper bound of $O(n^3)$ and lower bound of $\Omega(n^2)$. More generally, we prove a tight upper bound on the length of shortest paths between arbitrary configurations in one-counter transition systems (weaker bounds have previously appeared in the literature).
  • Following a recently considered generalization of linear equations to unordered data vectors, we perform a further generalization to ordered data vectors. These generalized equations naturally appear in the analysis of vector addition systems (or Petri nets) extended with ordered data. We show that nonnegative-integer solvability of linear equations is computationally equivalent (up to an exponential blowup) with the reachability problem for (plain) vector addition systems. This high complexity is surprising, and contrasts with NP-completeness for unordered data vectors. Also surprisingly, we achieve polynomial time complexity of the solvability problem when the nonnegative-integer restriction on solutions is dropped.
  • A vector addition system (VAS) with an initial and a final marking and transition labels induces a language. In part because the reachability problem in VAS remains far from being well-understood, it is difficult to devise decision procedures for such languages. This is especially true for checking properties that state the existence of infinitely many words of a particular shape. Informally, we call these \emph{unboundedness properties}. We present a simple set of axioms for predicates that can express unboundedness properties. Our main result is that such a predicate is decidable for VAS languages as soon as it is decidable for regular languages. Among other results, this allows us to show decidability of (i)~separability by bounded regular languages, (ii)~unboundedness of occurring factors from a language $K$ with mild conditions on $K$, and (iii)~universality of the set of factors.
  • We consider average-energy games, where the goal is to minimize the long-run average of the accumulated energy. While several results have been obtained on these games recently, decidability of average-energy games with a lower-bound constraint on the energy level (but no upper bound) remained open; in particular, so far there was no known upper bound on the memory that is required for winning strategies. By reducing average-energy games with lower-bounded energy to infinite-state mean-payoff games and analyzing the density of low-energy configurations, we show an almost tight doubly-exponential upper bound on the necessary memory, and that the winner of average-energy games with lower-bounded energy can be determined in doubly-exponential time. We also prove EXPSPACE-hardness of this problem. Finally, we consider multi-dimensional extensions of all types of average-energy games: without bounds, with only a lower bound, and with both a lower and an upper bound on the energy. We show that the fully-bounded version is the only case to remain decidable in multiple dimensions.
  • Data vectors generalise finite multisets: they are finitely supported functions into a commutative monoid. We study the question if a given data vector can be expressed as a finite sum of others, only assuming that 1) the domain is countable and 2) the given set of base vectors is finite up to permutations of the domain. Based on a succinct representation of the involved permutations as integer linear constraints, we derive that positive instances can be witnessed in a bounded subset of the domain. For data vectors over a group we moreover study when a data vector is reversible, that is, if its inverse is expressible using only nonnegative coefficients. We show that if all base vectors are reversible then the expressibility problem reduces to checking membership in finitely generated subgroups. Moreover, checking reversibility also reduces to such membership tests. These questions naturally appear in the analysis of counter machines extended with unordered data: namely, for data vectors over $(\mathbb{Z}^d,+)$ expressibility directly corresponds to checking state equations for Coloured Petri nets where tokens can only be tested for equality. We derive that in this case, expressibility is in NP, and in P for reversible instances. These upper bounds are tight: they match the lower bounds for standard integer vectors (over singleton domains).
  • One-counter nets (OCN) are finite automata equipped with a counter that can store non-negative integer values, and that cannot be tested for zero. Equivalently, these are exactly 1-dimensional vector addition systems with states. We show that both strong and weak simulation preorder on OCN are PSPACE-complete.
  • We study the computational and descriptional complexity of the following transformation: Given a one-counter automaton (OCA) A, construct a nondeterministic finite automaton (NFA) B that recognizes an abstraction of the language L(A): its (1) downward closure, (2) upward closure, or (3) Parikh image. For the Parikh image over a fixed alphabet and for the upward and downward closures, we find polynomial-time algorithms that compute such an NFA. For the Parikh image with the alphabet as part of the input, we find a quasi-polynomial time algorithm and prove a completeness result: we construct a sequence of OCA that admits a polynomial-time algorithm iff there is one for all OCA. For all three abstractions, it was previously unknown if appropriate NFA of sub-exponential size exist.
  • We show that the language equivalence problem for regular and context-free commutative grammars is coNEXP-complete. In addition, our lower bound immediately yields further coNEXP-completeness results for equivalence problems for communication-free Petri nets and reversal-bounded counter automata. Moreover, we improve both lower and upper bounds for language equivalence for exponent-sensitive commutative grammars.
  • One-Counter nets (OCN) consist of a nondeterministic finite control and a single integer counter that cannot be fully tested for zero. They form a natural subclass of both One-Counter Automata, which allow zero-tests and Petri Nets/VASS, which allow multiple such weak counters. The trace inclusion problem has recently been shown to be undecidable for OCN. In this paper, we contrast the complexity of two natural restrictions which imply decidability. First, we show that trace inclusion between an OCN and a deterministic OCN is NL-complete, even with arbitrary binary-encoded initial counter-values as part of the input. Secondly, we show Ackermannian completeness of for the trace universality problem of nondeterministic OCN. This problem is equivalent to checking trace inclusion between a finite and a OCN-process.
  • One-counter nets (OCN) are Petri nets with exactly one unbounded place. They are equivalent to a subclass of one-counter automata with only a weak test for zero. We show that weak simulation preorder is decidable for OCN and that weak simulation approximants do not converge at level omega, but only at omega^2. In contrast, other semantic relations like weak bisimulation are undecidable for OCN, and so are weak (and strong) trace inclusion.
  • Energy games are a well-studied class of 2-player turn-based games on a finite graph where transitions are labeled with integer vectors which represent changes in a multidimensional resource (the energy). One player tries to keep the cumulative changes non-negative in every component while the other tries to frustrate this. We consider generalized energy games played on infinite game graphs induced by pushdown automata (modelling recursion) or their subclass of one-counter automata. Our main result is that energy games are decidable in the case where the game graph is induced by a one-counter automaton and the energy is one-dimensional. On the other hand, every further generalization is undecidable: Energy games on one-counter automata with a 2-dimensional energy are undecidable, and energy games on pushdown automata are undecidable even if the energy is one-dimensional. Furthermore, we show that energy games and simulation games are inter-reducible, and thus we additionally obtain several new (un)decidability results for the problem of checking simulation preorder between pushdown automata and vector addition systems.
  • One-counter nets (OCN) are Petri nets with exactly one unbounded place. They are equivalent to a subclass of one-counter automata with just a weak test for zero. Unlike many other semantic equivalences, strong and weak simulation preorder are decidable for OCN, but the computational complexity was an open problem. We show that both strong and weak simulation preorder on OCN are PSPACE-complete.
  • This paper is about reachability analysis in a restricted subclass of multi-pushdown automata. We assume that the control states of an automaton are partially ordered, and all transitions of an automaton go downwards with respect to the order. We prove decidability of the reachability problem, and computability of the backward reachability set. As the main contribution, we identify relevant subclasses where the reachability problem becomes NP-complete. This matches the complexity of the same problem for communication-free vector addition systems, a special case of stateless multi-pushdown automata.
  • This paper explores the well known approximation approach to decide weak bisimilarity of Basic Parallel Processes. We look into how different refinement functions can be used to prove weak bisimilarity decidable for certain subclasses. We also show their limitations for the general case. In particular, we show a lower bound of {\omega} \ast {\omega} for the approximants which allow weak steps and a lower bound of {\omega} + {\omega} for the approximants that allow sequences of actions. The former lower bound negatively answers the open question of Jan\v{c}ar and Hirshfeld.
  • Timed automata and register automata are well-known models of computation over timed and data words respectively. The former has clocks that allow to test the lapse of time between two events, whilst the latter includes registers that can store data values for later comparison. Although these two models behave in appearance differently, several decision problems have the same (un)decidability and complexity results for both models. As a prominent example, emptiness is decidable for alternating automata with one clock or register, both with non-primitive recursive complexity. This is not by chance. This work confirms that there is indeed a tight relationship between the two models. We show that a run of a timed automaton can be simulated by a register automaton, and conversely that a run of a register automaton can be simulated by a timed automaton. Our results allow to transfer complexity and decidability results back and forth between these two kinds of models. We justify the usefulness of these reductions by obtaining new results on register automata.