• Using high resolution spectra from the VLT LEGA-C program, we reconstruct the star formation histories (SFHs) of 607 galaxies at redshifts $z = 0.6-1.0$ and stellar masses $\gtrsim10^{10}$M$_{\odot}$ using a custom full spectrum fitting algorithm that incorporates the emcee and FSPS packages. We show that the mass-weighted age of a galaxy correlates strongly with stellar velocity dispersion ($\sigma_*$) and ongoing star-formation (SF) activity, with the stellar content in higher-$\sigma_*$ galaxies having formed earlier and faster. The SFHs of quiescent galaxies are generally consistent with passive evolution since their main SF epoch, but a minority show clear evidence of a rejuvenation event in their recent past. The mean age of stars in galaxies that are star-forming is generally significantly younger, with SF peaking after $z<1.5$ for almost all star-forming galaxies in the sample: many of these still have either constant or rising SFRs on timescales $>100$Myrs. This indicates that $z>2$ progenitors of $z\sim1$ star-forming galaxies are generally far less massive. Finally, despite considerable variance in the individual SFHs, we show that the current SF activity of massive galaxies ($>$L$_*$) at $z\sim1$ correlates with SF levels at least $3$Gyrs prior: SFHs retain `memory' on a large fraction of the Hubble time. Our results illustrate a novel approach to resolve the formation phase of galaxies, and in identifying their individual evolutionary paths, connects progenitors and descendants across cosmic time. This is uniquely enabled by the high-quality continuum spectroscopy provided by the LEGA-C survey.
  • A decade of study has established that the molecular gas properties of star-forming galaxies follow coherent scaling relations out to z~3, suggesting remarkable regularity of the interplay between molecular gas, star formation, and stellar growth. Passive galaxies, however, are expected to be gas-poor and therefore faint, and thus little is known about molecular gas in passive galaxies beyond the local universe. Here we present deep Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of CO(2-1) emission in 8 massive (Mstar ~ 10^11 Msol) galaxies at z~0.7 selected to lie a factor of 3-10 below the star-forming sequence at this redshift, drawn from the Large Early Galaxy Astrophysics Census (LEGA-C) survey. We significantly detect half the sample, finding molecular gas fractions <~0.1. We show that the molecular and stellar rotational axes are broadly consistent, arguing that the molecular gas was not accreted after the galaxies became quiescent. We find that scaling relations extrapolated from the star-forming population over-predict both the gas fraction and gas depletion time for passive objects, suggesting the existence of either a break or large increase in scatter in these relations at low specific star formation rate. Finally, we show that the gas fractions of the passive galaxies we have observed at intermediate redshifts are naturally consistent with evolution into local massive early-type galaxies by continued low-level star formation, with no need for further gas accretion or dynamical stabilization of the gas reservoirs in the intervening 6 billion years.
  • In this study we present the exploration of $\sim$500 spectroscopically confirmed galaxies in and around two large scale structures at $z\sim1$ drawn from the ORELSE survey. A sub-sample of these galaxies ($\sim$150) were targeted for the initial phases of a near-infrared MOSFIRE spectroscopic campaign investigating the differences in selections of galaxies which had recently ended a burst of star formation or had rapidly quenched (i.e., post-starburst or K+A galaxies). Selection with MOSFIRE resulted in a post-starburst sample more than double that selected by traditional $z\sim1$ (observed-frame optical) methods even after the removal of the relatively large fraction of dusty starburst galaxies selected through traditional methods. While the traditional post-starburst fraction increased with increased global density, the MOSFIRE-selected post-starburst fraction was found to be constant in field, group, and cluster environments. However, this fraction relative to the number of galaxies with ongoing star formation was observed to elevate in the cluster environment. Post-starbursts selected with MOSFIRE were predominantly found to exhibit moderately strong [OII] emission originating from activity other than star formation. Such galaxies, termed K+A with ImposteR [OII]-derived Star formation (KAIROS) galaxies, were found to be considerably younger than traditionally-selected post-starbursts and likely undergoing some form of feedback absent or diminished in traditional post-starbursts. A comparison between the environments of the two types of post-starbursts suggests a picture in which the evolution of a post-starburst galaxy is considerably different in cluster environments than in the more rarefied environments of a group or the field.
  • We present stellar rotation curves and velocity dispersion profiles for 104 quiescent galaxies at $z=0.6-1$ from the Large Early Galaxy Astrophysics Census (LEGA-C) spectroscopic survey. Rotation is typically probed across 10-20kpc, or to an average of 2.7${\rm R_e}$. Combined with central stellar velocity dispersions ($\sigma_0$) this provides the first determination of the dynamical state of a sample selected by a lack of star formation activity at large lookback time. The most massive galaxies ($M_{\star}>2\times10^{11}\,M_{\odot}$) generally show no or little rotation measured at 5kpc ($|V_5|/\sigma_0<0.2$ in 8 of 10 cases), while ${\sim}64\%$ of less massive galaxies show significant rotation. This is reminiscent of local fast- and slow-rotating ellipticals and implies that low- and high-redshift quiescent galaxies have qualitatively similar dynamical structures. We compare $|V_5|/\sigma_0$ distributions at $z\sim0.8$ and the present day by re-binning and smoothing the kinematic maps of 91 low-redshift quiescent galaxies from the CALIFA survey and find evidence for a decrease in rotational support since $z\sim1$. This result is especially strong when galaxies are compared at fixed velocity dispersion; if velocity dispersion does not evolve for individual galaxies then the rotational velocity at 5kpc was an average of ${94\pm22\%}$ higher in $z\sim0.8$ quiescent galaxies than today. Considering that the number of quiescent galaxies grows with time and that new additions to the population descend from rotationally-supported star-forming galaxies, our results imply that quiescent galaxies must lose angular momentum between $z\sim1$ and the present, presumably through dissipationless merging, and/or that the mechanism that transforms star-forming galaxies also reduces their rotational support.
  • Drawing from the LEGA-C dataset, we present the spectroscopic view of the stellar population across a large volume- and mass-selected sample of galaxies at large lookback time. We measure the 4000\AA\ break (D$_n$4000) and Balmer absorption line strengths (probed by H$\delta$) from 1019 high-quality spectra of $z=0.6 - 1.0$ galaxies with $M_\ast = 2 \times 10^{10} M_\odot - 3 \times 10^{11} M_\odot$. Our analysis serves as a first illustration of the power of high-resolution, high-S/N continuum spectroscopy at intermediate redshifts as a qualitatively new tool to constrain galaxy formation models. The observed D$_n$4000-EW(H$\delta$) distribution of our sample overlaps with the distribution traced by present-day galaxies, but $z\sim 0.8$ galaxies populate that locus in a fundamentally different manner. While old galaxies dominate the present-day population at all stellar masses $> 2\times10^{10} M_\odot$, we see a bimodal D$_n$4000-EW(H$\delta$) distribution at $z\sim0.8$, implying a bimodal light-weighted age distribution. The light-weighted age depends strongly on stellar mass, with the most massive galaxies $>1\times10^{11}M_\odot$ being almost all older than 2 Gyr. At the same time we estimate that galaxies in this high mass range are only $\sim3$ Gyr younger than their $z\sim0.1$ counterparts, at odd with pure passive evolution given a difference in lookback time of $>5$ Gyr; younger galaxies must grow to $>10^{11}M_\odot$ in the meantime, and/or small amounts of young stars must keep the light-weighted ages young. Star-forming galaxies at $z\sim0.8$ have stronger H$\delta$ absorption than present-day galaxies with the same D$_n$4000, implying larger short-term variations in star-formation activity.
  • Here I report the scaling relation between the baryonic masses and the scale lengths of stellar discs from $\sim$1000 morphologically late-type galaxies. The baryonic mass-size relation is a single power-law $R_\ast \propto M_b^{0.38}$ across $\sim$3 orders of magnitude in baryonic mass. The scatter in size at fixed baryonic mass is nearly constant and there is essentially no outlier. The baryonic mass-size relation provides a more fundamental description of the structure of the discs than the stellar mass-size relation. The slope and the scatter of the stellar mass-size relation can be understood in the context of the baryonic mass-size relation. For gas-rich galaxies, the stars is no longer a good tracer for the baryons. High baryonic mass, gas-rich galaxies appear to be much larger at fixed stellar mass because most of the baryonic content is gas. The stellar mass-size relation thus deviates from the power law baryonic relation and the scatter increases at the low stellar mass end. Those extremely gas-rich low-mass galaxies can be classified as Ultra Diffuse Galaxies based on the structure.
  • We investigate the impact of local environment on the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) spanning a wide range of galaxy densities from the field up to dense cores of massive galaxy clusters. Data are drawn from a sample of eight fields from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large-Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey. Deep photometry allow us to select mass-complete samples of galaxies down to 10^9 Msol. Taking advantage of >4000 secure spectroscopic redshifts from ORELSE and precise photometric redshifts, we construct 3-dimensional density maps between 0.55<z<1.3 using a Voronoi tessellation approach. We find that the shape of the SMF depends strongly on local environment exhibited by a smooth, continual increase in the relative numbers of high- to low-mass galaxies towards denser environments. A straightforward implication is that local environment proportionally increases the efficiency of (a) destroying lower-mass galaxies and/or (b) growth of higher-mass galaxies. We also find a presence of this environmental dependence in the SMFs of star-forming and quiescent galaxies, although not quite as strongly for the quiescent subsample. To characterize the connection between the SMF of field galaxies and that of denser environments we devise a simple semi-empirical model. The model begins with a sample of ~10^6 galaxies at z_start=5 with stellar masses distributed according to the field. Simulated galaxies then evolve down to z_final=0.8 following empirical prescriptions for star-formation, quenching, and galaxy-galaxy merging. We run the simulation multiple times, testing a variety of scenarios with differing overall amounts of merging. Our model suggests that a large number of mergers are required to reproduce the SMF in dense environments. Additionally, a large majority of these mergers would have to occur in intermediate density environments (e.g. galaxy groups).
  • We investigate the stellar kinematics and stellar populations of 58 radio-loud galaxies of intermediate luminosities (L$_{3 GHz}$ $>$ 10$^{23}$ W Hz$^{-1}$ ) at 0.6 < z < 1. This sample is constructed by cross-matching galaxies from the deep VLT/VIMOS LEGA-C spectroscopic survey with the VLA 3 GHz dataset. The LEGA-C continuum spectra reveal for the first time stellar velocity dispersions and age indicators of z $\sim$ 1 radio galaxies. We find that $z\sim 1$ radio-loud AGN occur exclusively in predominantly old galaxies with high velocity dispersions: $\sigma_*>$ 175 km s$^{-1}$, corresponding to black hole masses in excess of $10^8$ M$_{\odot}$. Furthermore, we confirm that at a fixed stellar mass the fraction of radio-loud AGN at z $\sim$ 1 is 5 - 10 times higher than in the local universe, suggesting that quiescent, massive galaxies at z $\sim$ 1 switch on as radio AGN on average once every Gyr. Our results strengthen the existing evidence for a link between high black-hole masses, radio loudness and quiescence at z $\sim$ 1.
  • We examine the effects of an impending cluster merger on galaxies in the large scale structure (LSS) RX J0910 at $z =1.105$. Using multi-wavelength data, including 102 spectral members drawn from the Observations of Redshift Evolution in Large Scale Environments (ORELSE) survey and precise photometric redshifts, we calculate star formation rates and map the specific star formation rate density of the LSS galaxies. These analyses along with an investigation of the color-magnitude properties of LSS galaxies indicate lower levels of star formation activity in the region between the merging clusters relative to the outskirts of the system. We suggest that gravitational tidal forces due to the potential of the merging halos may be the physical mechanism responsible for the observed suppression of star formation in galaxies caught between the merging clusters.
  • We examine the relation between gas-phase oxygen abundance and stellar mass---the MZ relation---as a function of the large scale galaxy environment parameterized by the local density. The dependence of the MZ relation on the environment is small. The metallicity where the MZ relation saturates and the slope of the MZ relation are both independent of the local density. The impact of the large scale environment is completely parameterized by the anti-correlation between local density and the turnover stellar mass where the MZ relation begins to saturate. Analytical modeling suggests that the anti-correlation between the local density and turnover stellar mass is a consequence of a variation in the gas content of star-forming galaxies. Across $\sim1$ order of magnitude in local density, the gas content at a fixed stellar mass varies by $\sim5\%$. Variation of the specific star formation rate with environment is consistent with this interpretation. At a fixed stellar mass, galaxies in low density environments have lower metallicities because they are slightly more gas-rich than galaxies in high density environments. Modeling the shape of the mass-metallicity relation thus provides an indirect means to probe subtle variations in the gas content of star-forming galaxies.
  • We study the effect of surface brightness on the mass-metallicity relation using nearby galaxies whose gas content and metallicity profiles are available. Previous studies using fiber spectra indicated that lower surface brightness galaxies have systematically lower metallicity for their stellar mass, but the results were uncertain because of aperture effect. With stellar masses and surface brightnesses measured at WISE W1 and W2 bands, we re-investigate the surface brightness dependence with spatially-resolved metallicity profiles and find the similar result. We further demonstrate that the systematical difference cannot be explained by the gas content of galaxies. For two galaxies with similar stellar and gas masses, the one with lower surface brightness tends to have lower metallicity. Using chemical evolution models, we investigate the inflow and outflow properties of galaxies of different masses and surface brightnesses. We find that, on average, high mass galaxies have lower inflow and outflow rates relative to star formation rate. On the other hand, lower surface brightness galaxies experience stronger inflow than higher surface brightness galaxies of similar mass. The surface brightness effect is more significant for low mass galaxies. We discuss implications on the different inflow properties between low and high surface brightness galaxies, including star formation efficiency, environment and mass assembly history.
  • The Cl1604 supercluster at $z \sim 0.9$ is one of the most extensively studied high redshift large scale structures, with more than 500 spectroscopically confirmed members. It consists of 8 clusters and groups, with members numbering from a dozen to nearly a hundred, providing a broad range of environments for investigating the large scale environmental effects on galaxy evolution. Here we examine the properties of 48 post-starburst galaxies in Cl1604, comparing them to other galaxy populations in the same supercluster. Incorporating photometry from ground-based optical and near-infrared imaging, along with $Spitzer$ mid-infrared observations, we derive stellar masses for all Cl1604 members. The colors and stellar masses of the K+A galaxies support the idea that they are progenitors of red sequence galaxies. Their morphologies, residual star-formation rates, and spatial distributions suggest galaxy mergers may be the principal mechanism producing post-starburst galaxies. Interaction between galaxies and the dense intra-cluster medium is also effective, but only in the cores of dynamically evolved clusters. The prevalence of post-starburst galaxies in clusters correlates with the dynamical state of the host cluster, as both galaxy mergers and the dense intra-cluster medium produce post-starburst galaxies. We also investigate the incompleteness and contamination of K+A samples selected by means of H$\delta$ and [OII] equivalent widths. K+A samples may be up to $\sim50\%$ incomplete due to the presence of LINER/Seyferts and up to $\sim30\%$ of K+A galaxies could have substantial star formation activity.
  • Here we present observations with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope of the nearby, transition-type dwarf galaxy KK258 = ESO468-020. We measure a distance of 2.23$\pm$0.05 Mpc using the Tip of Red Giant Branch method. We also detect H$\alpha$ emission from this gas-poor dwarf transition galaxy at the velocity $V_h$ = 92$\pm$5 km s$^{-1}$ or $V_{LG}$ = 150 km s$^{-1}$. With this distance and velocity, KK258 lies near the local Hubble flow locus with a peculiar velocity $\sim$3 km s$^{-1}$. We discuss the star formation history of KK258 derived from its colour-magnitude diagram. The specific star formation rate is estimated to be log[sSFR] = $-2.64$ and $-2.84$ (Gyr$^{-1}$) from the FUV-flux and H$\alpha$-flux, respectively. KK258 has the absolute magnitude $M_B = -10.3$ mag, the average surface brightness of 26.0 mag arcsec$^{-2}$ and the hydrogen mass ${\rm log}(M_{HI}) < 5.75 M_\odot$. We compare KK258 with 29 other dTr- galaxies situated within 5 Mpc from us, and conclude that its properties are typical for transition dwarfs. However, KK258 resides 0.8 Mpc away from its significant neighbour, the Sdm galaxy NGC 55, and such a spatial isolation is unusual for the local transition dwarfs.
  • In this paper, we extend the use of the tip of the red giant branch (TRGB) method to near-infrared wavelengths from previously-used $I$-band, using the \textit{Hubble Space Telescope (HST)} Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Upon calibration of a color dependency of the TRGB magnitude, the IR TRGB yields a random uncertainty of $\sim 5%$ in relative distance. The IR TRGB methodology has an advantage over the previously-used ACS $F606W$ and $F814W$ filter set for galaxies that suffer from severe extinction. Using the IR TRGB methodology, we obtain distances toward three principal galaxies in the Maffei/IC 342 complex, which are located at low Galactic latitudes. New distance estimates using the TRGB method are 3.45$^{+0.13}_{-0.13}$ Mpc for IC 342, 3.37$^{+0.32}_{-0.23}$ Mpc for Maffei 1 and 3.52$^{+0.32}_{-0.30}$ Mpc for Maffei 2. The uncertainties are dominated by uncertain extinction, especially for Maffei 1 and Maffei 2. Our IR calibration demonstrates the viability of the TRGB methodology for observations with the \textit{James Webb Space Telescope (JWST)}.
  • We measured the Tip of the Red Giant Branch distances to nine galaxies in the direction to the Virgo cluster using the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. These distances put seven galaxies: GR 34, UGC 7512, NGC 4517, IC 3583, NGC 4600, VCC 2037 and KDG 215 in front of the Virgo, and two galaxies: IC 3023, KDG 177 likely inside the cluster. Distances and radial velocities of the galaxies situated between us and the Virgo core clearly exhibit the infall phenomenon toward the cluster. In the case of spherically symmetric radial infall we estimate the radius of the "zero-velocity surface" to be (7.2+-0.7) Mpc that yields the total mass of the Virgo cluster to be (8.0+-2.3) X 10^{14} M_sun in good agreement with its virial mass estimates. We conclude that the Virgo outskirts does not contain significant amounts of dark matter beyond its virial radius.
  • Cosmicflows-2 is a compilation of distances and peculiar velocities for over 8000 galaxies. Numerically the largest contributions come from the luminosity-linewidth correlation for spirals, the TFR, and the related Fundamental Plane relation for E/S0 systems, but over 1000 distances are contributed by methods that provide more accurate individual distances: Cepheid, Tip of the Red Giant Branch, Surface Brightness Fluctuation, SNIa, and several miscellaneous but accurate procedures. Our collaboration is making important contributions to two of these inputs: Tip of the Red Giant Branch and TFR. A large body of new distance material is presented. In addition, an effort is made to assure that all the contributions, our own and those from the literature, are on the same scale. Overall, the distances are found to be compatible with a Hubble Constant H_0 = 74.4 +-3.0 km/s/Mpc. The great interest going forward with this data set will be with velocity field studies. Cosmicflows-2 is characterized by a great density and high accuracy of distance measures locally, falling to sparse and coarse sampling extending to z=0.1.
  • The multiple protostellar system L1551 IRS5 exhibits a large-scale bipolar molecular outflow. We have studied this outflow within ~4000 AU of its driving source(s) with the SubMillimeter Array. Our CO(2-1) image at ~4" (~560 AU) resolution reveals three distinct components: 1) an X-shaped structure spanning ~20" from center with a similar symmetry axis and velocity pattern as the large-scale outflow; 2) an S-shaped structure spanning ~10" from center also with an opposite velocity pattern to the large-scale outflow; and 3) a compact central component spanning ~1.4" from center again with a similar symmetry axis and velocity pattern as the large-scale outflow. The X-shaped component likely comprises the limb-brightened walls of a cone-shaped cavity excavated by the outflows from the two main protostellar components. The compact central component likely comprises material newly entrained by one or both outflows from the two main protostellar components. The S-shaped component mostly likely comprises a precessing outflow with its symmetry axis inclined in the opposite sense to the plane of the sky than the other two components. This outflow may be driven by a recently reported candidate third protostellar component in L1551 IRS5, whose circumstellar disk is misaligned relative to the two main protostellar components. Gravitational interactions between this protostellar component and its more massive northern neighbor may be causing the circumstellar disk and hence outflow of this component to precess.